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  1. #1
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    Jan 2009
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    I guess I値l be trying kayaking

    Well the youngest wants to kayak...which means I致e been volunteered to go with. I could certainly use some advice on boats/skirts/paddles. Never even sat in one.

    Open to hand me down gear that痴 local as well.

    Thoughts?


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  2. #2
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    Dec 2018
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    Whitewater or Touring? That will make a big difference on gear just like alpine or Nordic skiing.

  3. #3
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    Whitewater


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  4. #4
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    Dec 2018
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    DownEast
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    Ok, whitewater. Kayak sizing is based on your weight and measured in Gallons of volume. Manufacturers give a weight range and a Gallon measurement for each boat. Beginners want to be in the bottom of the weight range so the kayaks edges will float higher and be less grabby to flip you. Example: If a kayaks weight range is 140-200lbs, a beginner would want to be 140-150lb range to leave them some extra float. That’s the basics of sizing.

    Then there are two ways to go.

    1) Buy new boats. Liquid Logic Remix are great beginner boats that come in 4 sizes to fit you and your kid. They are a great independent company (The Mags of the kayak world) that sells direct and will ship to your door. Price is about a $1000 each and they will hold their resale well as they are a popular boat. Lots of people start in a Remix and still keep them as that are great river runners.



    2)Buy used boats. Plan on spending lots of time researching to get to know what boats are good for beginners. Used boats are $400-$500 for anything reasonably current and in good shape. A used Remix or Dagger Mamba would be a safe bet for beginners. Feel free to let me know you and your kids size and weights and pm me if you find some used boats that you are curious about.

    Good luck, have fun, and get some lessons/instruction. You can probably rent/demo boats for your first few outings from the outfitter/guide.
    Last edited by singlecross; 08-29-2020 at 07:20 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Denver/SoCal
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    453
    Quote Originally Posted by detrusor View Post
    Well the youngest wants to kayak...which means I’ve been volunteered to go with.


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    You seem really excited. Did your dog die in a tragic kayak accident?
    Everybody's gotta have parkas. I'm talking custom parkas. Two words: "client development." They see all of you out there cutting the powder in your matching Schweikart & Cokely parkas, you'll make an impression. You will thank me later.

  6. #6
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    Mar 2008
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    northern BC
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    how old ? IME kids doing the WW usually doesnt work all that well till they have hit puberty to get a bit more strength and a bit more size to fit the gear, altho I have seen a small for his size 11 yr old do rodeo moves in one of them small size jackson fun using a cut down lightning paddle

    YOu gotta really wana do it if yer gona do it
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Park City
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    She is 9, super shredding aggressive and strong kid. I致e never even sat in one, hence my hesitation....found her a super on sale Jackson fun 1.5.... signed up for a lesson for the 2 of us.




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  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    The best advice I can give is try not to die.

  9. #9
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    Park City
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    That痴 my fear....


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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    northern BC
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    my kid got into WW it at 14 with adult size gear, he did well but he had the strength, size and was a good athelite

    9 is pretty young someone that young tends to lack body strength but at least the Fun 1 or Fun 1.5 are small enough

    outfitting the seat hips and knees to be snug like a ski boot with mini-cell is pretty key to boat control so the paddler doesnt slop around in the boat

    BTW for someone that small paddles are pretty easy to cut down cuz there is not alot of stress in the middle of the paddle shaft SO

    - cut a chunk of shaft from the middle,
    - whittle a 5" plug to go inside the shaft, epoxy it into one side and clamp it straight for curing, IME a BD workmate table worked great for this, tilt the table on its side to let the epoxy flow into the plug
    - epoxy/clamp the 2 halves together in the table, tilt the table on its side again to let the epoxy flow into the joint
    - don't forget to set the feather, i would put it at 15degree, if you have questions just ask

    IME you really want to really want to be there
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Dude it's gonna be a fkn blast. Best summers I ever had were spent paddling whitewater every day.

    Be ready to be humbled! Are you (very) comfortable in the water? Strong understanding of swimming and water movement? You'll be spending a lot of time upsidedown, half-trapped with your hips in a plastic shell, trying not to panic while holding your breath, figuring out how to roll. Rolling is the key, you must practice this and become proficient before going out on the river or you'll have a bad time, mmkay. Your kid will learn it easily but you will have more habit to overcome.

    Rolling is easy, but you need a solid mentor. Doesn't need to be a pro instructor, but if it's a friend or acquaintance they need to be ready to adapt to your comfort level. WEAR SWIM GOGGLES whether in the pool or the pond so you can see the position of your paddle, and to gain comfort/confidence in an otherwise dark workspace.

    Watch good paddlers and observe the apparent ease of their movements. Core is king, wrist/blade movements are subtle but important. In lower volume boats, weight transfer becomes another huge factor.

    eta: get the fit right as Al mentioned
    life ain't guaranteed, love your people while you can

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    Slightly off route
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    Real steep learning curve - at least it was for me. Weekly pool sessions should be in the plan. Lessons like you mentioned.

    Don't rush getting on the river, but when you do, bring others. Even a strong boater will have their hands full with a beginner. 1:1 or even 2:1 with a beginner is ideal - one gets the boater, the other gets the stuff when they swim.

    But on a positive note, it is a lot of fun even if you never went past Class III. Hiking trails and ski runs may get crowded, but the river always seems open and another boater is a welcomed sight.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    on the banks of Fish Creek
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    roll practice is key.....

  14. #14
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    Jan 2009
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    Park City
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    Thanks for the advice! I致e rafted a bunch, strong swimmer, don稚 panic easily.

    Getting more excited. Sept 3rd is first lesson


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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    New Mexico
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    I guess I値l be trying kayaking

    If you get into trouble, paddle. If you swim, do everything you can to hang on to your paddle. Start out with a boat that has softer edges if possible. Keep than chin tucked. Sounds like you池e doin everything right so far, enjoy it!
    Fear, Doubt, Disbelief, you have to let it all go. Free your mind!

  16. #16
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    Apr 2005
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    A LSD Steakhouse somewhere in the Wasatch
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    tell her the sups way cooler and better balance core ski training
    otherwise good luck
    "When the child was a child it waited patiently for the first snow and it still does"- Van "The Man" Morrison
    "I find I have already had my reward, in the doing of the thing" - Buzz Holmstrom
    "THIS IS WHAT WE DO"-AML -ski on in eternal peace
    "I have posted in here but haven't read it carefully with my trusty PoliAsshat antenna on."-DipshitDanno

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    oh and it aint white its more of a greenish brown and flat
    but the bear is a cool way underused local waterway in a unique ecosystem


    fontennelle would be another good teeth cuttin float
    "When the child was a child it waited patiently for the first snow and it still does"- Van "The Man" Morrison
    "I find I have already had my reward, in the doing of the thing" - Buzz Holmstrom
    "THIS IS WHAT WE DO"-AML -ski on in eternal peace
    "I have posted in here but haven't read it carefully with my trusty PoliAsshat antenna on."-DipshitDanno

  18. #18
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    Park City
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    She痴 already a SUP machine! Never been to bear lake...hard to believe.


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  19. #19
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    NCW
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    I swam the bear one time with a kayak accessory.

  20. #20
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    Mar 2008
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    northern BC
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    Quote Originally Posted by detrusor View Post
    Thanks for the advice! I’ve rafted a bunch, strong swimmer, don’t panic easily.

    Getting more excited. Sept 3rd is first lesson
    well thats ^^ a better sign than the vibe you were putting out

    IME getting involved with a paddling club is usually a good ideas
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    15,061
    YOu gotta really wana do it if yer gona do it
    That is Numero Uno
    I have been in this State for 30 years and I am willing to admit that I am part of the problem.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Idaho
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    Kayaking is great. I used to boat every day ranging from surf sessions to Vs to beer drinking class 2-3 runs with my buddies. Like a few here, being poor, paddling every day, renting a room from friends, being a very below average employee...some of the best times.

    The learning curve can be steep but depends on what you want to get out of it. Learn a roll in a pool, figure out it's completely different in moving water, swim some, and then finally get one in the river. Pretty rad the first few times. Also boost confidence and you'll start trying more stuff.

    The community of people is great. Pow doesn't get tracked, water just keeps flowing. There might be a couple people deep waiting for the wave but people cycle through fast.

    I spend about 30 days a year in my raft now-beer, a cot, kitchen gear etc is more comfortable but I still try to get in my kayak a few days a year because I've lost the feel so it's a little scary and I get to learn again. You don't have to push boundaries to make it fun.

    I'd say enjoy every minute of it. I bet it will be cool to watch your kid learn and pick it up yourself. My guess is she will learn faster and you'll get to be a proud pop while having some fun and spending time with her.

    If you were close to me, I'd loan you everything you need. I wouldn't buy new but I wouldn't go super old either. The boat outfitting in the last 5-6 years is so much more comfy than in the past. You might be able to find stuff to borrow. If not, ksl or cl should have some deals on boat/skirt/paddles. It seems to be a sport people get into and then fall out of as people get older. Then a few years later they are tired of storing a big piece of tupperware in the garage and sell it all as a package. Run ideas by the group here.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    2,366
    Quote Originally Posted by detrusor View Post
    That痴 my fear....


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    OK, I値l be the downer. Become aware of the ways people die on the river, if you aren稚 already.

    One way is to get sideways up against a rock and have the current wrap your boat around the rock with you trapped inside. I almost accomplished this a couple times. It痴 unbelievable how strong water pressure can be, even at moderate levels like class III.

    Another way is flip over, and now your head and body, resembling a keel, is a lot closer to those rocks and other debris at the bottom of the river. Take a rock to the face and get knocked unconscious, or get caught in wedge between rocks or other debris. Good roll technique can minimize that danger, but not completely eliminate it.

    Get caught in a back current on the other side of a weir or large rock. There痴 a spot on the Guadalupe River in Texas called 鉄lumber Falls that used to claim one or two lives per year, mostly drunk tubers. Being aware of the river will allow you to just avoid those places for the most part.

    Trees in the water (sweepers and strainers). Yeah, stay away from those.

    And also, hypothermia can be an issue.

    Some of these hazards can be reduced by using a kayak you sit on top of, rather than inside. The last time I went, the outfitters only had 都it on kayaks to rent. Not nearly as much fun, but fun enough for a beginner, at least, and a little bit safer. You might consider that option and renting for the first few times you go. If nothing else, to see if this is something you like.

    All that said, it IS a hell of a lot of fun. But quite a bit more dangerous than skiing.

  24. #24
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    Don't sell this man on some lame fuckin sit-on-top!

    He's got time to think about the safety things.
    life ain't guaranteed, love your people while you can

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
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    Yup, Sit-on-tops are very lame, I tried one in the surf, way too much volume of boat to try and control even if you know what you are doing

    the rest of it is stuff you gotta learn which is why its a good idea to take a course and hang out with other boaters in a kayak club
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

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