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  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by garyfromterrace View Post
    tgapp, thanks so much for the schooling. Great info, I wondered why my buddy always used a little cone filter thingee to make his coffee. Thought he was just too cheap to buy a bodum. Keep it up.
    ha thanks man!

    people get way too caught up in how the coffee is brewed. that part really doesn't matter. the only reason i brew v60 is because i love the smell - but i brewed bodum for years, and aeropress before that. whatever works - even those electric autobrewer gizmos, those can make great coffee too.

    i guess if i could only drive home one point it would be to focus on your grind and your beans. that's what matters most, no matter how many fucks you give about coffee.

  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    yeah so there really are a million different ways of processing coffee, but two main families - washed and naturally processed coffees. washed are still pulped and fermented, and then rinsed off, whereas dry processed are totally left to rot/ferment. there are a ton of different, experimental processing techniques coming out now though, and a kenyan washed coffee will have undergone a slightly different protocol than a columbian washed coffee. speaking broadly - there's like a spectrum. washed > giling basah (indonesian coffees) > honey process > anaerobic fermentation shit (weird, i don't get it, but i see more and more of it lately) > dry processed. even among dry processed coffees, there is such a huge range - brazillian dries taste nutty and chocolatey, whereas ethiopian dry processed coffee tastes boozey and berry-y.

    caffeine is tough; can't do much about it. your best bet is to source good decaf, and blend that with caffeinated coffee. the best decafs on the market are either swiss water process or mountain water processed, and any roaster worth their salt will tell you that. aim for natural ethiopians or sometimes guatemalans, those seem to hold up well to water-based caffeine removal.
    Last question, what if I wanted the most caffeine? Any regions or varieties stronger? I know robusta beans are stronger than arabica but even the best donít taste as good as arabica varieties it seems?

    Thanks, this thread really is the best.


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  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joey Joe Joe Junior Shabadoo View Post
    Last question, what if I wanted the most caffeine? Any regions or varieties stronger? I know robusta beans are stronger than arabica but even the best donít taste as good as arabica varieties it seems?

    Thanks, this thread really is the best.


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    Robusta is shit. Nobody drinks it. Even the very best robusta will be like 82-84 point coffee and it tastes awful - it lacks sweetness and acidity, and is just rough to drink.

    Again, caffeine is tricky. The lighter the roast, the more caffeine there is per bean, but because the individual beans are heavier (they haven't lost as much water weight yet, because they spent less time in the roaster), there are fewer light-roasted beans for the same weight of coffee. So, assuming that you are brewing by weight and ratio, it all works out to be more or less the same. Dark coffee = less caffeine per bean but more beans per cup, light coffee = more caffeine per bean but less beans per cup.

    When I need a lot of caffeine I do a shot of espresso and a cup of brewed coffee at the same time.

    The other option is to do a caffeine fast and reset your tolerance. You gotta go cold turkey - not even a drop. Caffeine takes about two weeks to clear your system entirely (the first three days are fucking brutal), but after you make it thru the other side caffeine becomes crazy strong.

    Sent from my Pixel 4 using Tapatalk

  4. #79
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    coffee for mags - a coffee roasting trip report (& free mag coffee)

    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    yeah you're fine honestly. do the beans come up all the way to room temperature?
    If youíre asking about the beans that are removed from the freezer but not selected for brewing that day Iíd assume no given the out of freezer time they experience. Iíve grown more intentional about minimizing their out of freezer time. Typically 1x per day for < 2 min. I am sure to get only more neurotic about it now

    *edit - just timed it. 50 seconds of out of freezer time exposure without rushing.

    On the caffeine question the whole point is to drink delicious coffee. So just drink more if more caffeine needed/desired. Win win.

    The roasting to water weight info is an interesting tidbit.
    Uno mas

  5. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    Robusta is shit. Nobody drinks it. Even the very best robusta will be like 82-84 point coffee and it tastes awful - it lacks sweetness and acidity, and is just rough to drink.

    Again, caffeine is tricky. The lighter the roast, the more caffeine there is per bean, but because the individual beans are heavier (they haven't lost as much water weight yet, because they spent less time in the roaster), there are fewer light-roasted beans for the same weight of coffee. So, assuming that you are brewing by weight and ratio, it all works out to be more or less the same. Dark coffee = less caffeine per bean but more beans per cup, light coffee = more caffeine per bean but less beans per cup.

    When I need a lot of caffeine I do a shot of espresso and a cup of brewed coffee at the same time.

    The other option is to do a caffeine fast and reset your tolerance. You gotta go cold turkey - not even a drop. Caffeine takes about two weeks to clear your system entirely (the first three days are fucking brutal), but after you make it thru the other side caffeine becomes crazy strong.

    Sent from my Pixel 4 using Tapatalk
    Thanks again man


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  6. #81
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    Thanks for doing this. Always had an interest

  7. #82
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    On the question of smoke from roasting, my wife (who isn't a coffee drinker) is of the strong opinion that all roasting must be done outside. Though again, this is with the $20 roaster and not the $1,400 roaster.

    I also don't notice a huge difference with degassing post-roasting. Sure, harder to get a good extraction right after roasting, but usually I'm excited to try out whatever I just roasted, so I brew a cup.

    Finally, if you have two small kids and making pour-over coffee in the morning feels like too much "active" work, the Clever Coffee Dripper is sort of a hybrid between a pour-over and a french press, but without the grit of a french press: https://amzn.to/3kYMKu2

  8. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by cravenmorhead View Post
    On the question of smoke from roasting, my wife (who isn't a coffee drinker) is of the strong opinion that all roasting must be done outside. Though again, this is with the $20 roaster and not the $1,400 roaster.

    I also don't notice a huge difference with degassing post-roasting. Sure, harder to get a good extraction right after roasting, but usually I'm excited to try out whatever I just roasted, so I brew a cup.

    Finally, if you have two small kids and making pour-over coffee in the morning feels like too much "active" work, the Clever Coffee Dripper is sort of a hybrid between a pour-over and a french press, but without the grit of a french press: https://amzn.to/3kYMKu2
    yeah people think that roasting coffee must smell amazing. it doesn't. well - i mean - i love the smell of it, but i think that's pavlovian. it certainly doesn't smell like brewing coffee; it's like a sweet smell of burnt paper.

    for degassing - i do honestly think that some coffees really come into their own after a few days. more than once i've been excited to drink something so i brew a cup pretty much from the cooling tray, only to be sorely disappointed. then, i forget about the coffee, move on with my life, and come back a week later only to find out that it's turned into something fantastic. idk though. for me - kenyans and washed ethiopians drink really well right out of the roaster, but naturals tend to need a few days. in either case though - 2 week old coffee isn't ever BAD coffee. 3 month old beans, sure, but 2 weeks is still great.

    +1 on the clever. i brewed on one for a few years until it broke. got it from kyle dempster, again, a fucking legend in every sense.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    first batch of mag coffee is roasted and ready to go out!

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    hand grinder beta:

    the best entry-level hand grinder is this guy here: https://prima-coffee.com/equipment/hario/mscs-2dtb - at $40, it's a steal. it's honestly kinda shitty to use, so if you can spend more i would, but it gets the job done and is great for french press to pourover.

    if you wanna go a step up with a hand grinder - this is my next pick: https://prima-coffee.com/equipment/knock/aergrind - this one clocks in at $160, but it'll last you for life, and it's capable of making world-class coffee.

    one other grinder pick - and this is what i use every day - is the lido 3 (or any lido grinder really): https://prima-coffee.com/equipment/o...spresso/lido-3 - this guy is designed by a couple in idaho, and it's amazing. comparable to the knock but a few bucks more. i would recommend it in a heartbeat, for what it's worth.
    Wow. $160-200 for a hand grinder is a tough pill to swallow. I bought this guy about 5 years ago and am pretty happy with it: https://rhinocoffeegear.com/rhino-co...d-grinder.html

    Grind quality is probably comparable to the Hario but the overall design and ergonomics seem a lot better.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joey Joe Joe Junior Shabadoo View Post
    Last question, what if I wanted the most caffeine? Any regions or varieties stronger? I know robusta beans are stronger than arabica but even the best donít taste as good as arabica varieties it seems?
    Drink more coffee, or just chew up whole cheap beans. Seriously. I do this for caffeine dosing on long rides and runs. In brewed coffee a lot of the caffeine must get left behind in the spent grounds because eating beans feels like it gives 2-3x the caffeine kick. Start small and eat more if needed.

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Wow. $160-200 for a hand grinder is a tough pill to swallow. I bought this guy about 5 years ago and am pretty happy with it: https://rhinocoffeegear.com/rhino-co...d-grinder.html

    Grind quality is probably comparable to the Hario but the overall design and ergonomics seem a lot better.
    it looks like the same burr set as the Hario, but way easier to use. yeah get that one. the hario sucks to use. the grind quality is good - amazing at that price point. it's just the ergonomics of the thing that are awful. good recommendation!

    and yeah $200 on a hand grinder is a bit much - but for something i use every day, i think it's worthwhile. hell, i spent way more on my microwave, and i don't use that on the daily.

    fwiw this hand grinder is what my heart lusts after:

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    at $1000 - it's a lot. but some day.

    https://weberworkshops.com/products/hg-1

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    fwiw this hand grinder is what my heart lusts after:

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    at $1000 - it's a lot. but some day.

    https://weberworkshops.com/products/hg-1
    That is insane. Totally rad, but insane. The $200 grinder is a totally justifiable purchase for someone as into coffee as you are. Plus, it will probably last your entire life. One thing I forgot to mention about the Rhino grinder, if you need to grind a lot you can hook it up to your drill chuck in a jiff.

  12. #87
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    Awesome tgapp, I think you've talked me into the aeropress. I have a decent grinder, a scale and an electric kettle, so I just need to learn the process.

  13. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    Awesome tgapp, I think you've talked me into the aeropress. I have a decent grinder, a scale and an electric kettle, so I just need to learn the process.
    if you do aeropress get either the prismo pressure valve or a metal screen. the prismo pressure valve allows you to make decent "espresso light" coffee, while the metal screen is just less fussy and allows for more oil to come thru to the cup (richer flavor IMO). i like the prismo personally, but i'm not a daily aeropress drinker.

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    if you do aeropress get either the prismo pressure valve or a metal screen. the prismo pressure valve allows you to make decent "espresso light" coffee, while the metal screen is just less fussy and allows for more oil to come thru to the cup (richer flavor IMO). i like the prismo personally, but i'm not a daily aeropress drinker.
    Looks like the prismo includes a metal screen?

    What do you think of this process: https://fellowproducts.com/blogs/lea...-prismo-recipe

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    the cheapest good electric grinder is this guy: https://prima-coffee.com/equipment/baratza/485. baratza is a great company and that is a great product. still, the grind quality (at $140) doesn't even come close to the grind quality of a $160 hand grinder, but it is very convenient to use, and baratza has an incredible warranty.

    1. a plastic v60 - this is what i use. seriously. every fucking day. and guess what, mine is cracked and i still use it. plastic is actually better for brewing coffee, believe it or not, because it retains heat better than glass or ceramic, and leads to a more stable brew temp. plus, if you're a fuckup like me, you can drop it and it doesn't break. https://prima-coffee.com/equipment/hario/vd-03t. the thing costs fucking $8, and it's amazing. trust me. get the big one, which is what i linked above.

    2. it is not the 19th century and if you're not using an electric kettle then gtfo. seriously. this is a must have.
    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    https://prima-coffee.com/equipment/bonavita/bv1500ts - makes great coffee, $109, highly recommend it. it is a little small (like 30oz brewed), but i like it.
    I'll vouch for all of those items.

    I bought that burr grinder back when it was still named Solis Maestro so that's gotta be what... at least a decade ago? ...and it's still going strong. For the hundredish bucks I spent, it's down to about a penny per use at this point. Highly recommended. (since I'm a heathen, I do use it for espresso as well)

    For a single cup, I have the smaller version of that v60. It's perfect for when it's zerodark:30 and I need just enough coffee for the drive to work. Since travel mugs have grown to ridiculous quantities, I probably need a bigger one now. The simplest solutions are often the best.

    And I guess I'm a Luddite, because my kettle is heated by the stove.

    We also have two bonavita drip machines, and IMHO they make the best drip (at anywhere near their price point). And they're fast. Most other inexpensive drip machines don't get the water hot enough or allow too much cooling.

  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    Looks like the prismo includes a metal screen?

    What do you think of this process: https://fellowproducts.com/blogs/lea...-prismo-recipe
    looks good, the only trouble i have with that is how specific the temps are for it. kind of a pain in the ass at home, on a tuesday, at 4 o'clock in the morning before a dawn patrol. i would try it and see if you like it.

  17. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    looks good, the only trouble i have with that is how specific the temps are for it. kind of a pain in the ass at home, on a tuesday, at 4 o'clock in the morning before a dawn patrol. i would try it and see if you like it.
    Good point on the temps. I would never make that happen. I'll keep looking...

  18. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    I'll keep looking...
    Add grounds to AP, add water to AP, stir, steep, press.

  19. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Add grounds to AP, add water to AP, stir, steep, press.
    This. The best part of an AP is its pretty hard to fuck up.

  20. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Add grounds to AP, add water to AP, stir, steep, press.
    You new here? What about the pre soak, the weighing, the grind sifting, timers......

  21. #96
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    Some of those Brewer's Cup recipes are just ridiculous, that one included. Also, the Prismo looks cool and worth the modest price for the nice filter screen and no-drip check valve, but I'm calling BS on it making anything truly close to espresso. Espresso machines usually extract at around 9 bars of pressure, that's 130 psi. You will not and should not get anywhere close to that much pressure in an AP.

  22. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Some of those Brewer's Cup recipes are just ridiculous, that one included.
    Yeah, what in the actual fuck is going on with that? Iím trying to get caffeinated quickly and painlessly not measure water temperatures for ten minutes.

  23. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    You new here? What about the pre soak, the weighing, the grind sifting, timers......
    YOU NEED THE 600 MICRON SCREEN GODDAMMIT, IT'LL JUST BE PISS WATER WITH THE 500!

    this tek seems pretty simple:

    https://fellowproducts.com/blogs/bre...on-brew-how-to

    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman
    Some of those Brewer's Cup recipes are just ridiculous, that one included. Also, the Prismo looks cool and worth the modest price for the nice filter screen and no-drip check valve, but I'm calling BS on it making anything truly close to espresso. Espresso machines usually extract at around 9 bars of pressure, that's 130 psi. You will not and should not get anywhere close to that much pressure in an AP.
    ^^ this is true but the prismo valve will extract MORE of the oils in coffee then a simple immersion style brew method. it's a great cup of coffee - usually around a 3:1 ratio with lots of flavor. people just compare it to espresso because that's the closest referent.

  24. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    ^^ this is true but the prismo valve will extract MORE of the oils in coffee then a simple immersion style brew method
    Even this I find pretty dubious. I doubt it extracts more oils that any other method that doesn't use a paper filter.

  25. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Even this I find pretty dubious. I doubt it extracts more oils that any other method that doesn't use a paper filter.
    maybe not, idk.

    i have an espresso machine capable of flow profiling - which means, among other things, that i have a $3k piece of hardware that effectively imitates a $25 aeropress - and i use it in aeropress mode all the time. coarser grind, no real "puck" to speak of, and i never let the pressure get above 2 bars (i reckon you're getting between 2 and 4 bars of pressure with the prismo gizmo). i even do the same ratios, more or less - like 25 g in, 100g out. all i can say is, it's MUCH richer than immersion brewing at the same ratio. it's one of my favorite brewing methods - especially because i can do it right away and not wait 6 days for the coffee to be ready for espresso. and yeah for $25 it's a no brainer IMO, even if it's not espresso.

    but yeah i'm honestly not a coffee snob, and i think that at the point where you're worried about 145 degree water on your bloom, you've kind of missed the whole point of the goddamn thing.

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