Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 72

Thread: SUP

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    16,974

    SUP

    Joining the old farts flat water club cuz I got me a SUP on the way.

    Looking to do mostly flat water attainments, maybe some fishing and or camping. Low water way to get out and some exercise too.

    Anyone doing it? Post yor uni blade ghey as shit stand on it stories and stokage.
    watch out for snakes

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dystopia
    Posts
    11,721
    Dave Kalama had some good videos years ago.

    https://www.davidkalama.com/reach-dammit-reach/

    The stroke is done when the paddle reaches your feet.

    Your not a gondolier.
    Youíre a reach and dig dig dig paddlwr
    ďLife has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.Ē
    Hunter S. Thompson

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    21,655
    same with any canoe or kayak paddle stroke
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dystopia
    Posts
    11,721
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    same with any canoe or kayak paddle stroke
    True. But 90% of the sups I see are gondoliers
    Theyíre also fat and lazy.


    Kalama taught me a lot.

    Itís a canoe paddle theory. And Hawaiian and Tahitian are very different.
    But they both have reach.
    And the power stroke is in front of you.
    ďLife has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.Ē
    Hunter S. Thompson

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dystopia
    Posts
    11,721
    hen I was in high school I did a lot of ski racing and was fortunate to have some very good coaches work with me. One of the things that always intrigued me was how the right combination of words could have a profound effect on a personís understanding and visualization of a desired movement. So much so, that my only goal in life was to be a ski coach because I enjoyed the challenge of finding that word or phrase that could change everything for someone trying to learn a new movement. Telling someone to bend their knees isnít always effective, but telling someone to bend their knees as if they were sitting down in a chair gives them a very specific image of their goal. Telling someone to reach will really only get most people about 80% of the way there. Telling some to reach as if a $100.00 bill were just outside their grasp, usually will get them the rest of the way.

    Iíve been traveling a lot in the last six months, which means Iíve been coaching a lot in the last six months. Which also means Iíve had the opportunity to observe what are the most common mistakes people make in their paddle strokes.

    One general tip that I think everyone can benefit from is to analyze every single part of your stroke. If a movement doesnít serve a specific purpose in making your stroke work, then change it or get rid of it.

    Perhaps the most common mistake is to lower your top hand too much during the recovery or exit stage of the stroke. The reason you want to keep your top hand at shoulder level or higher is that the lower you take it, the more you have to raise it again to get into proper reaching position. The more you lower it, the more wasted movement youíre creating for yourself.

    The first reason your hand will drop too low is because you pull the paddle back too far. In order for your paddle to go past your feet, your top hand has to drop to accommodate the angle. The reason thatís bad is because it is very difficult to generate much power or momentum once the paddle has gone past your feet and also at that point you are actually starting to pull yourself down into the water. The fix: Donít pull the paddle past your feet and then your top hand wonít drop too low.

    The second reason your top hand can drop too low is because during the recovery stage (moving the paddle forward to reach again), you lift the blade too high out of the water. I see people lift their paddles any where from six inches to three feet over the water while bringing the paddle forward. Thatís anywhere from five inches to two feet eleven inches too much. Unless your paddle is much too short the only way for your blade to get that high is to drop your top hand to the side to accommodate the angle. Technically your blade only needs to be a fraction of an inch above the water to move forward without hitting. One way gain awareness about where your blade is during this phase is to actually touch the water on the way back to your reaching position. So while youíre swinging the paddle into itís forward position give the water just the slightest tap at the half way point. This will insure that the paddle is not too high as well as give you instant feedback on how high the blade is relative to the water. As long as the front edge of the paddle is slightly higher than the back edge, your paddle wonít dive down into the water when you tap. Once you have a feel for it, just skip the tap and go straight to the reaching forward position.

    Keeping your top hand above your shoulder can take a lot of energy, and fatigue you quite quickly, so hereís some free extra energy. Support the top hand by supporting the paddle with your bottom hand. Your bottom hand has good leverage, so it can do the work easily. This allows your top hand the opportunity to rest for a split second while the bottom hand is doing the work for the top by using gravity as an ally. By hooking your finger tips and cradling the paddle shaft in your bottom hand you can support the weight of the paddle and your top hand quite easily. Thatís a lot of things to remember in mid-stroke, so you might cue that support when you break your wrist inward to feather the blade. Let your lower hand hold the weight and push the paddle forward toward the reach position while your upper hand rests.

    One good way to be aware of your top hand is to actually focus on it and watch it for five stokes. I mean actually pick a freckle or knuckle or whatever is on the back of your hand and for five strokes keep your eyes focused on it. If your hand stays in front of your face you shouldnít have to move your head, if you find you are moving your head to keep your eyes on it, then youíre moving your top hand too much, and you can tell if the drop in your hand is down or to the side. The trick to this is locking your eyes on the chosen spot and donít look away or past it.

    The second very common mistake is not getting the paddle all the way into the water. If you can see any part of the blade when you start to pull then you need to go deeper. A specific goal you can aim for is to have the top of your blade three inches under the surface of the water. This will enable the blade to do itís job and permit you to get the most for your efforts. Another way to think of it is to get your ice cream scooper all the way down into the ice cream, so that you can get a full scoop.

    The third and perhaps most important mistake I see, is people working way too hard. One example Iíve been giving people lately is this, imagine drinking a glass of water. You would grab the glass with very little effort, you would bring it to your mouth with very relaxed muscles, and doing almost no flexing of your muscles at all. Now imagine grabbing the glass with so much effort you almost smash the glass, imagine bringing it up to your mouth now with every muscle flexed like a body builder posing, the glass would be vibrating and water spilling over the rim. While that my be an exaggeration, I do see people exerting that type of force while trying to paddle. Paddling most of the time needs to be a very flowing and rhythmic action, not a tense muscle flexed series of positions, but rather a constant continually moving movie. Donít get me wrong, there is a time and a place to exert yourself, but if your base stroke comes from a place of rhythm and flow, when you exert yourself you will be much more effective and efficient. The best fix for it is to greatly reduce your power level and learn how to use your technique as your driving force, not your power output. Decrease your power to the level that you donít feel like youíre doing any work at all, and just concentrate on technique. Youíll be surprised at how fast you go. Just like drinking that glass of water, get to a point of calm relaxed movement before you start chugging. Have fun.

    Aloha,

    Dave Kalama
    ďLife has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.Ē
    Hunter S. Thompson

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    16,974
    good stuff
    watch out for snakes

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ECO
    Posts
    5,136
    Flat water is fine and chill mostly, though I would like to toss a fly at some point. Get it on a decent river with some I & IIís and you will have a blast. Even good for this old fart. If I didnít do the river, I would have fun, but less driven to get out there and do it. Get knee pads if you do. Youíre welcome.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    16,974
    Yep, watched some viddy of pros in white water. They had knee/shin pads I noticed.

    Gonna be a flat water thing for me mostly.

    Still a bit sore from last weekends outing.

    My buddy has a plastic fishing SUP and he does fly fish off it often.

    Would post sum pics but the site seems screwed up any more.
    watch out for snakes

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ECO
    Posts
    5,136
    You donít have to go like a pro to have fun. Just find the flows that work for you before it gets too boney. Just depends on what is accessible to you. Flat water is cool, but I find myself wanting to push for more of a challenge most times.
    And another suggestion if not already mentioned, is get a pump that will auto inflate. Especially if you are not a young buck. But make sure it can handle the volume. Got a SeaOtter(?) one that sucked, but the Bravo one is money. Can find on nrs.com. Can get you a link if interested. Unless yours isnít inflatable.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    737
    I got out on a borrowed SUP for the first time today. I did ok but definitely felt a little insecure. Iím probably not ditching my kayak just yet.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    16,974
    Yeah, I was not in a good headspace to move to SUP but on the flat waters I like it now. Still gonna kayak stuff.

    Getting out on the water and exercise are really primary reasons for me.

    I always say its good to be a beginner again, develops additional skills and keeps one humble.

    Hopefully my new one shows up today.
    watch out for snakes

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    9,438
    SUP is fun. I get out a few times a week on our lake. Usually in the AM before the wind picks up. I like it better on flat water than a kayak because I can't sit down that long. I like the mobility of being able to move around and stretch. I'm no speed demon but can turn it up when I want. I'm usually just out there to chill and crack a beer. We found a cool cave to paddle out to and hike back into.

    Wear a leash (on the lake), it can save you. If the wind picks up, it can throw you off and take your board really far. I've had it happen, our lakes are probably colder than yours though. On the river is of course another story but I still like a leash with a QR.

    Also, the inflatable PFDs are nice to have instead of a regular PFD.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    21,655
    I have canoes/ kayaks/ and a blow up SUP

    Using the seakayak for flat water its 60 lbs and at the limit of what I can handle alone but at < 30 lbs the SUP is the easiest to handle, so i can just grab the SUP/ paddle out of the truck and be paddling way easier, I still use the seakayak on the bigger lake, each one is a nice diversion

    SUP makes the smaller local lake feel a little bigger
    Last edited by XXX-er; 07-25-2020 at 10:55 PM.
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    16,974
    Got out today for a solotude cruise up the Blackwater into Canaan Valley. Getting it figured out. Need a shorter skeg, add a bit of rigging and tweak my off side stroke a bit more.

    Funtastic
    watch out for snakes

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ECO
    Posts
    5,136
    Weíre going to take the pup with us on the river tomorrow. This may be my last post.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    6,342
    Quote Originally Posted by SkiBall View Post
    Weíre going to take the pup with us on the river tomorrow. This may be my last post.
    That river? You'll fit right in! Don't forget the STD of your choice plus a side on Corona at the Warm Springs. Joking aside, good luck. I just ain't up for the Upper C weekend junk show with a side of too cool for school serious fisher-choad.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    3,567
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    That river? You'll fit right in! Don't forget the STD of your choice plus a side on Corona at the Warm Springs. Joking aside, good luck. I just ain't up for the Upper C weekend junk show with a side of too cool for school serious fisher-choad.
    Quoted for posterity

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ECO
    Posts
    5,136
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    That river? You'll fit right in! Don't forget the STD of your choice plus a side on Corona at the Warm Springs. Joking aside, good luck. I just ain't up for the Upper C weekend junk show with a side of too cool for school serious fisher-choad.
    Did the lower section at Cottonwood to Dotzero. Dog swam at least half of it, but not going to do that very often with him. Just goes board to board. Wasnít awful but just not as much standing up dealing with the pup. He had fun so worth it. Do the upper next week minus pup. Water level was decent.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    16,974
    Looking at air compressors, what y’all using?


    Glad you and the pup made it skiballs.
    watch out for snakes

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    16,974
    Attachment 335502

    Hey, pictures working again.

    oar maybe not

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	E263725E-0957-4803-896B-8C8D823CF106.jpg 
Views:	58 
Size:	975.9 KB 
ID:	335522
    Last edited by SB; 07-27-2020 at 03:27 PM.
    watch out for snakes

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ECO
    Posts
    5,136
    Quote Originally Posted by SB View Post
    Looking at air compressors, what y’all using?


    Glad you and the pup made it skiballs.
    Skiballs is a freak that bites my rhyme.

    https://www.nrs.com/product/1706/bra...e-12-volt-pump

    I use this pump. Set it and forget it. But blew one out cuz I think you need o have unattached when you start the car. Clips on battery. You can find them on sale occasionally. Paid about $135 for mine.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    16,974
    Purchased the Blowfish inflator, hope to use it this weekend.

    Picked it as it was well rated having multiple fittings, high temp hose, psi adjustable up 20 with auto shut off and it has an internal fan to help cool the high and low compressors.
    watch out for snakes

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    16,974
    Found this, looks interdasting and it’s not stupid expensive

    https://boostsurfing.com/sup/?utm_so...m_campaign=sup
    watch out for snakes

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ECO
    Posts
    5,136
    If I was doing big lakes that might get stuck with a strong headwind coming home, I’ll admit that it would be nice to have in my pack to clip on. Stash in the back of my brain, but nah on cost v reward for my needs.
    Eventually we will have an electric SUP bitch thread.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    16,974
    I would need a nice CF paddle before I get an ESUP booster fin but I can also see where they would be useful.

    As one thing we have learnt here in da past is early adopters are often guinea pigs.
    watch out for snakes

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •