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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    The Chicken Coop, Seattle
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    2,719

    Do I dare build a bike?

    I have a stand. A few tools. I have some sense of what I want.

    Hardtail - swap a rigid carbon and a 120mm fork back and forth for commuting vs single track.

    My old (old af) bike was a specialized stumpy hardtail from 2001. I still like that bike, but I want 29Ē wheels and modern build compliance.

    I hate drop bars. Gotta be flat.
    Donít want a gravel bike.
    I want a slack-ish hardtail w/ a 1x setup. 175mm crank. Looking for a light commuter that hauls and can convert to a light XC bike that hauls.

    Not too many rigid hardtails out there for sale that arenít single speeds.

    Once I find the frame I want, Pink bike for used components?

    Anyone want to talk me out of a charbon OEM Santa Cruz highball from diycarbon?

    I welcome all opinions (biased af or Otherwise) about any part of this project. Shill me the right components etc for any part of this project.

    I like the bianchi sea foam green/cyan blue color a lot.

    I do a great template hand ski mount.
    wait!!!! waitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwait...Wait!
    Zoolander wasn't a documentary?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Can/USA
    Posts
    999
    I recently built a chromag stylus from the frame up with limited bike tools, a stand and some left over parts. It certainly had itís frustrating moments with setting the crown race as the most annoying and frustrating as well as cutting the fork stem. I enjoyed doing it but Iím happy it wasnít my only bike because it took me a lot longer to build and piece together then I had originally planned.

    In my area the used bike market has exploded ( same with parts) so that might be hit or miss which can be frustrating if you want to build on a budget or have specific parts in mind.

    Overall I enjoyed it, happy I did it, can say I bully it from the frame and will probably never sell it and will curse myself when it breaks.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Strong and Free
    Posts
    385
    Quote Originally Posted by SupreChicken View Post
    Hardtail - swap a rigid carbon and a 120mm fork back and forth for commuting vs single track.
    Assuming you want to commute weekdays and ride single track on the weekend, swapping forks twice a week is going to get tiresome really fast. Why not just set up your old bike for commuting and make the new one a dedicated mtb?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    840
    Quote Originally Posted by TrueNorth View Post
    Assuming you want to commute weekdays and ride single track on the weekend, swapping forks twice a week is going to get tiresome really fast. Why not just set up your old bike for commuting and make the new one a dedicated mtb?
    This. Although whether the old bike can truly be a decent commuter option kind of depends how far you're commuting. Old 26"mtb can do the job but an old cheap 700c bike is going to be way faster and more efficient if you're covering any decent distance.

    That said yes, build the bike yourself - fun project imho if you can sort thru all the part compatibility issues.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    20,777
    building a bike is fun, interesting, satisfying.

    its is NOT cost effective if your time has any value.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    2,729
    Quote Originally Posted by SupreChicken View Post
    Anyone want to talk me out of a charbon OEM Santa Cruz highball from diycarbon?
    Tell me more. What size? Do you have geometry chart?

    Sent from my SM-N970U using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
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    9,579
    Quote Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
    building a bike is fun, interesting, satisfying.

    its is NOT cost effective if your time has any value.
    It's not really cost effective even if your time doesn't have value.

    Unless you are extremely particular about the parts on the bike, it's almost always cheaper to buy something complete.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    The Chicken Coop, Seattle
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    Quote Originally Posted by sethschmautz View Post
    Tell me more. What size? Do you have geometry chart?

    Sent from my SM-N970U using Tapatalk
    19Ē - same size as my stumpy

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/00...g?v=1556671945

    For some reason couldnít get it imbed
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    Zoolander wasn't a documentary?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    The Chicken Coop, Seattle
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrueNorth View Post
    Assuming you want to commute weekdays and ride single track on the weekend, swapping forks twice a week is going to get tiresome really fast. Why not just set up your old bike for commuting and make the new one a dedicated mtb?
    This could be done with a rigid fork. Hard to find a 26Ē fork with with right axle to crown that isnít disc only, but there are a couple on eBay.

    The sid fork is just toast. Found a shop to service it, they went deep into the bag of tricks to get the lockout to work and that lasted about 20 miles of commuting.

    Then the old 3x9 gearing system is just dumb af, so I would want more than need a beater 1x group set.
    wait!!!! waitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwait...Wait!
    Zoolander wasn't a documentary?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    594
    Have you considered the a la carte-program from Commmencal?

    Let's you order a frame and the components you want. That way you can buy some components new, and pick up some loacally

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Donner Summit
    Posts
    792
    For a commuter, just take off the front derailleur, left shifter, and little and big rings. Thatíll leave you with a 36x12-36 or thereabouts which should be plenty unless you have massive hills on your commute. Shorten the chain and swap the middle ring for a narrow-wide if you still get chain drops (you could also bump up to a larger chainring if you replace it).

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    2,729
    Quote Originally Posted by SupreChicken View Post
    19Ē - same size as my stumpy

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/00...g?v=1556671945

    For some reason couldnít get it imbed
    Hmmm... Rear spacing?

    Sent from my SM-N970U using Tapatalk

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    The Fish
    Posts
    3,263
    69.5* head tube angle...
    a positive attitude will not solve all of your problems, but it may annoy enough people to make it worth the effort

    Formerly Rludes025

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    The Chicken Coop, Seattle
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    Quote Originally Posted by sethschmautz View Post
    Hmmm... Rear spacing?

    Sent from my SM-N970U using Tapatalk
    Do you mean boost or non boost? I was thinking boost. Only options on it are 12-142 or 12-148.

    Is that what you meant?
    wait!!!! waitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwait...Wait!
    Zoolander wasn't a documentary?

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    The Chicken Coop, Seattle
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    Quote Originally Posted by teledad View Post
    For a commuter, just take off the front derailleur, left shifter, and little and big rings. Thatíll leave you with a 36x12-36 or thereabouts which should be plenty unless you have massive hills on your commute. Shorten the chain and swap the middle ring for a narrow-wide if you still get chain drops (you could also bump up to a larger chainring if you replace it).
    I like this idea-

    It could cost $0

    Or...

    A single 38 or 40t chain ring is usually gettable for cheap.

    If I were so inclined, a new cassette doesnít have to cost much.

    Nor does a new chain.

    So...$100 or less for all 3? Plus the fork?

    Thatís probably my test venue. If this small bit of work is undoable or more PITA than I want to face, , then I probably shouldnít build a bike. If I love it, then perhaps I should.
    wait!!!! waitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwait...Wait!
    Zoolander wasn't a documentary?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    The Chicken Coop, Seattle
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    Quote Originally Posted by sf View Post
    Have you considered the a la carte-program from Commmencal?

    Let's you order a frame and the components you want. That way you can buy some components new, and pick up some loacally
    Will check this out today. Thank you.
    wait!!!! waitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwait...Wait!
    Zoolander wasn't a documentary?

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Sierra Foothills
    Posts
    525
    I'd give it a go. I'm in the process of building a gravel bike and have built a mountain bike in the past. To help ease the pain ($$), I look for sales, and buy virtually nothing at MSRP. You'll end up with more tools too.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    594
    Quote Originally Posted by SupreChicken View Post
    Will check this out today. Thank you.
    To be clear, I have no personal experience with this. Neither Commencal, nor building a bike.

    But I'm considering trying to build one myself, and Commencal looks pretty good. And hey, this is the internet, so everybody is an expert

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    The Chicken Coop, Seattle
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    They are all trail/enduro. Maybe one day, but for a hardtail that hauls, Iím not looking for 160mm travel on the front. For components only, they are a little better than the local shops near me, but I bet I can find better deals online.
    wait!!!! waitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwait...Wait!
    Zoolander wasn't a documentary?

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Walpole NH
    Posts
    8,516
    Itís called, Celeste green. And itís romantic as fuck.
    crab in my shoe mouth

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    2,729
    Quote Originally Posted by SupreChicken View Post
    Do you mean boost or non boost? I was thinking boost. Only options on it are 12-142 or 12-148.

    Is that what you meant?
    Yes. Sorry, I think I read your post wrong. Are you asking for somebody to "talk you out of" BUYING the bike linked or somebody to buy it from you? I took out as the latter.

    I'm looking for a gravel bike and interpreted your post to say you were trying to get rid of that frame and thought it might work as a gravel bike...

    I agree with Eluder. That's a fairly steep Head Angle. Is look for something a bit more slack. I bought a trek Stache on a whim this year and have been really surprised with how capable and fun it is. I have been recommending them to my friends.

    Sent from my SM-N970U using Tapatalk

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
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    20,612
    Quote Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
    building a bike is fun, interesting, satisfying.

    its is NOT cost effective if your time has any value.
    this ^^, not counting time its also usually cheaper to buy a bike ready made than to buy all the parts individualy
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    1,077
    I like building bikes from the frame up, no it not really cost-effective, but I think its fun. I try and do it fall to spring so I have time to hunt for parts deals and plenty of time to get it finished before I want to ride. The winter-spring sales are the best prices. I've done some pretty low-cost builds but you have to compromise somewhere breaks, shifters, wheels.
    Problem now is there are so many options, finding compatible parts is a pain.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Too far from the snow
    Posts
    464
    Building a bike up yourself is almost BETTER than mounting your own skis. Getting the shifting dialed and brakes bled is a little bit of black magic. Do it!

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Bottom feeding
    Posts
    8,154
    Quote Originally Posted by teledad View Post
    For a commuter, just take off the front derailleur, left shifter, and little and big rings. Thatíll leave you with a 36x12-36 or thereabouts which should be plenty unless you have massive hills on your commute. Shorten the chain and swap the middle ring for a narrow-wide if you still get chain drops (you could also bump up to a larger chainring if you replace it).
    I did this with my wifeís old 26 inch Hardtail and actually went with a smaller narrow/wide ring (I think a 32 or 34), so she could do any of the climbs. She tends to coast the steep downhills anyway. Zero issues and the wife likes the simplicity.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

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