Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 98
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Big in Japan
    Posts
    41,735

    Somebody did an academic study about inequality in JH

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/billio...ated-community

    This is kind of stark. A concentrated history of America since 1980:

    "In Teton County in 1980, only 30 percent of income came from financial investments, but by 2015, $8 out of every $10 in this community was made from financial investments."

    Let's do some livin'
    After, we die

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    13,131
    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    https://www.thedailybeast.com/billio...ated-community

    This is kind of stark. A concentrated history of America since 1980:

    "In Teton County in 1980, only 30 percent of income came from financial investments, but by 2015, $8 out of every $10 in this community was made from financial investments."
    To me investment means putting money into a company to help it get off the ground or expand. Most of what passes for investment in this country would more fairly be labeled speculation.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wasatch Back: 7000'
    Posts
    9,758
    Places like Jackson will always be open to the public, but buying land, not so much. This conflict will never end. Within legal parameters, rich people are entitled to spend their money as they see fit. There are certain "perfect" places that things like this happen, and Jackson is one of them. Working class people and academics can always complain about rich people and how they spend their money, but I am happy that some choose to spend their money on saving the moose, open space and the arts. I would be happier if others would choose to spend their money on things like affordable housing, goodwill, and other philanthropies that help and give access and opportunity to regular folk.
    A society that puts equality before freedom will get neither. A society that puts freedom before equality will get a high degree of both.
    ― Milton Friedman

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Making the Bowl Great Again
    Posts
    12,325
    Every billionaire is a policy failure.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Big in Japan
    Posts
    41,735
    Quote Originally Posted by schindlerpiste View Post
    Places like Jackson will always be open to the public, but buying land, not so much. This conflict will never end. Within legal parameters, rich people are entitled to spend their money as they see fit. There are certain "perfect" places that things like this happen, and Jackson is one of them. Working class people and academics can always complain about rich people and how they spend their money, but I am happy that some choose to spend their money on saving the moose, open space and the arts. I would be happier if others would choose to spend their money on things like affordable housing, goodwill, and other philanthropies that help and give access and opportunity to regular folk.
    Yeah, maybe, but you're disregarding one important point. Wyoming has no personal income tax or corporate tax. If they did, and, say, California didn't, then Tahoe would be just like JH, and JH would be a little more affordable for average schmoes.

    So, tax the rich. Easy.

    Let's do some livin'
    After, we die

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    11,590
    Well have at it, Benny...


    Meanwhile, thinly veiled panegyrics to Socialism and class warfare belong in Pollyass.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    YetiMan
    Posts
    11,424
    I want to learn more about these “token friend” positions

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    10,758
    Just switch careers and become an "Outdoor Adventurer"
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Magically whisked away to...Delaware
    Posts
    2,591
    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    Just switch careers and become an "Outdoor Adventurer"
    I'm planning my transition to "Outdoor Influencer."

    Quote Originally Posted by ill-advised strategy View Post
    I want to learn more about these “token friend” positions
    I've always wondered how I to get a "Kato Caelin" position. I can watch a house (or a murder) as well as anyone.
    It makes perfect sense...until you think about it.

    I suspect there's logic behind the madness, but I'm too dumb to see it.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    20,375
    no income tax & no corporate tax how is public infrastructure paid for, or did i miss something ?


    " I will say that it is odd to get on a ski lift, not see anyone until you get to the top, except for the person who helps you off, ski down, not see another person, and get back up and go again and not see another person. "

    hmmm ^^ kinda sounds like the local hill on a lot of days actualy
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Down In A Hole, Up in the Sky
    Posts
    27,353
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    no income tax & no corporate tax how is public infrastructure paid for, or did i miss something ?
    Sales tax, lodging tax, property tax, and extractive industries have traditionally pulled the heavy weight in Wyoming.
    Forum Cross Pollinator

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    59715
    Posts
    1,889
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post


    I've always wondered how I to get a "Kato Caelin" position.
    Duh, sell coke to rich people.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    cb, co
    Posts
    3,843
    Quote Originally Posted by schindlerpiste View Post
    spend their money on saving the open space I would be happier if others would choose to spend their money on things like affordable housing.
    It's a little secret that those two things are mutually exclusive. Lots of open space means constricting supply and Econ 101 will tell you that prices will go up. I'm not saying everything should be developed, just pointing out that one of the quickest ways to jack up RE prices is a well funded Open Space program.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Making the Bowl Great Again
    Posts
    12,325
    I think it depends on what sort of areas are being preserved as open space. We have that struggle in Missoula big-time but there is a huge difference between preserving large landscapes in only very marginally developable areas compared to preserving wide swaths of open space in between already developed areas.

    I am hugely skeptical of conservation easements, however. (Don't tell my wife).

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasatch
    Posts
    5,931
    Quote Originally Posted by goldenboy View Post
    It's a little secret that those two things are mutually exclusive. Lots of open space means constricting supply and Econ 101 will tell you that prices will go up. I'm not saying everything should be developed, just pointing out that one of the quickest ways to jack up RE prices is a well funded Open Space program.
    You can have open space and adequate housing supply. You can't have open space, adequate housing supply, and density restrictions. You have to choose two.

    Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    59715
    Posts
    1,889
    Quote Originally Posted by goldenboy View Post
    It's a little secret that those two things are mutually exclusive. Lots of open space means constricting supply and Econ 101 will tell you that prices will go up. I'm not saying everything should be developed, just pointing out that one of the quickest ways to jack up RE prices is a well funded Open Space program.
    This.

    Santa Cruz is a very good example.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wasatch Back: 7000'
    Posts
    9,758
    Regarding Jackson, you have a good point. With GTNP, JHMR, the elk preserve and more, Jackson is chock full of open space. While I am not sure how R1 is zoned up there, but if lots are 2+ acres, there may be no need to actively fund an open space program.
    A society that puts equality before freedom will get neither. A society that puts freedom before equality will get a high degree of both.
    ― Milton Friedman

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    13,131
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    I'm planning my transition to "Outdoor Influencer."



    I've always wondered how I to get a "Kato Caelin" position. I can watch a house (or a murder) as well as anyone.
    my wife's cousin has that job in Malibu for Bob Dylan

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wasatch Back: 7000'
    Posts
    9,758
    I could see that being a relationship right out of Positively 4th Street
    A society that puts equality before freedom will get neither. A society that puts freedom before equality will get a high degree of both.
    ― Milton Friedman

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    13,131
    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    I think it depends on what sort of areas are being preserved as open space. We have that struggle in Missoula big-time but there is a huge difference between preserving large landscapes in only very marginally developable areas compared to preserving wide swaths of open space in between already developed areas.

    I am hugely skeptical of conservation easements, however. (Don't tell my wife).
    Quote Originally Posted by Sirshredalot View Post
    You can have open space and adequate housing supply. You can't have open space, adequate housing supply, and density restrictions. You have to choose two.

    Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
    Agree. One of the easiest ways towns can handle the affordability issue is through zoning. Traditionally people have fought development that they perceived as too and even today developers are often forced to reduce density to get a project approved. The opposite should be true. Zone for high density--horizontal and vertical, with lots of multifamily buildings and with no large areas of green space between developments. The green space surrounds the town, it's not in it. The developer makes more money, the town makes more money, the environmentalists are happy because driving is reduced and because apartment buildings are more energy efficient than single family houses. The only people who lose out are the rich people who want mansions on large estates, because there aren't any. That kind of living has been the norm in Europe for centuries and seems to work well.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    cb, co
    Posts
    3,843
    Quote Originally Posted by Sirshredalot View Post
    You can have open space and adequate housing supply. You can't have open space, adequate housing supply, and density restrictions. You have to choose two.

    Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
    Fair point perhaps. But NIMBY's hate high density, so there you have it.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wasatch Back: 7000'
    Posts
    9,758
    Cluster zoning is effective and necessary in countries like Germany which is about the same size as Montana, but houses 85,000,000 people
    A society that puts equality before freedom will get neither. A society that puts freedom before equality will get a high degree of both.
    ― Milton Friedman

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    20,375
    Quote Originally Posted by I Skied Bandini Mountain View Post
    Duh, sell coke to rich people.
    or poor people

    prewar singapore there was no income but tax opium was legal the governmnet sold it and my grandfatehr worked at the opium plant, post war opium was illegal my father was a cop so he busted all the opium addicts

    grandpa got them hooked and pa busted them ... full service
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    59715
    Posts
    1,889
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    or poor people

    prewar singapore there was no income but tax opium was legal the governmnet sold it and my grandfatehr worked at the opium plant, post war opium was illegal my father was a cop so he busted all the opium addicts

    grandpa got them hooked and pa busted them ... full service
    My point was - Kato Kaelin was OJ's drug dealer.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Missoula, MT
    Posts
    20,745
    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    Agree. One of the easiest ways towns can handle the affordability issue is through zoning. Traditionally people have fought development that they perceived as too and even today developers are often forced to reduce density to get a project approved. The opposite should be true. Zone for high density--horizontal and vertical, with lots of multifamily buildings and with no large areas of green space between developments. The green space surrounds the town, it's not in it. The developer makes more money, the town makes more money, the environmentalists are happy because driving is reduced and because apartment buildings are more energy efficient than single family houses. The only people who lose out are the rich people who want mansions on large estates, because there aren't any. That kind of living has been the norm in Europe for centuries and seems to work well.
    A little bit of green space in town makes a big difference.
    No longer stuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    Just an uneducated guess.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •