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  1. #51
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    Reid Turner Blackburn (August 11, 1952 – May 18, 1980) was an American photographer killed in the 1980 volcanic eruption of Mount St. Helens.[1] A photojournalist covering the eruption for a local newspaper—the Vancouver, Washington Columbian[2]—as well as National Geographic magazine[3] and the United States Geological Survey,[4] he was caught at Coldwater Camp in the blast.[5][6]

    Blackburn's car and body were found four days after the eruption.[7] His camera, buried under the debris of the eruption, was found roughly one week later.[8]

    After his death, Blackburn was praised by his coworkers and friends alike. They spoke of his talent and enthusiasm, as well as his sometimes "acerbic" sense of humor.[9] His wife, Fay, concluded that he had died doing what he loved.[10]





    Blackburn's Volvo 144 after the eruption
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkiní Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  2. #52
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    Harry Truman, on the steps of his lodge the day before the eruption. Mount St. Helens buried his lodge under tons of mud and ash and he's been written off as dead.



    Ash cloud from Mount St. Helens over Ephrata, Washington (230 km (145 mi) downwind), after the May 18, 1980.



    Mike Fitzpatrick, Right, and Bob Muller wear handkerchiefs for protection from ash. They were heading home in Missoula, Mont, May 19, 1980 while volcanic residue filtered down into the streets.


    Unidentified body lies in back of ash covered pickup May 19, 1980 on Mount St. Helens near Toutle River, Basin. Officials believe the victim was killed by heat and the gas from volcanic eruption May 18 when Mt. St. Helens spewed plume of steam and hot ash 60,000 feet in air.


    Mount St. Helens, still a simmering menace in spite of being shorn of 100 million tons of rock, wrecked more bridges May 20, 1980 and threatened another flood of steaming mud and water. The Cowlitz river at Longview, Wash., is jammed with millions of logs. A lone boat is caught up in the debris.


    Residents of Moses lake, Wash., dig out after large deposits of volcanic ash were dumped on the city from the volcano Mount St. Helens on May 24, 1980. Moses lake is about 150 miles from Mount St. Helens in central Washington.


    Danny Balsch, 20, Longview, Wash., lies in a bed in Longview's St. John's hospital, where he is being treated for burns of the arms and legs received when the Mount St. Helens volcano exploded May 18. He and a friend, Brian Thomas were camping on the Green river, 14 miles north of the volcano when it exploded. Thomas was buried under logs, tree branches and debris. Balsch, along with four friends, rescued him. The four friends are missing as the search for bodies and survivors continues in the volcano area.


    Just as 100-foot snags left standing in the Green river valley after the eruption of Mount St. Helens have their nickname, standing dead, so does the timber that was blown down by the eruption. It is called dead and down.


    Trucks lie in piles after high water swept through a logging camp on the Toutle river following the eruption of Mount St. Helens.


    Dave Amos slogs through the mud on the family farm with inner tubes strapped to his feet May 23, 1980. "We always get a lot of water here," said his father, Jesse." Hundreds of years ago this farm was right in the main river channel. When volcanic ash, logs and mud came down the Cowlitz River from Mount St. Helens Sunday, it buried all 118 acres of his grazing land in what looked like liquid concrete.



    Bob Brown (left) and his brother John attempt to lead three horses to safety out of the Weyerhaeuser 19 Mile camp in Kid Valley, Washington. The yard was flooded by the Toutle River following the eruption of Mount St. Helens.


    A solidified mudflow covers State Highway 504 near the town of Toutle, northwest of Mount St. Helens, to a depth of 6 feet. Geologist for scale


    White shows the path volcanic ash is taking across the U.S. Dotted lines indicate where edge of cloud will be at noon of each day.
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

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  3. #53
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    Dec 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    Thatís a tough story to beat.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  4. #54
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    Nov 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    The crater rim is a damn cool place to visit.

    Attachment 328959Attachment 328960Attachment 328961
    I skied from the crater rim 20 years ago, April 30th.

  5. #55
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    Nov 2006
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    An amazing shot of the plume from UW CARG Aircraft. http://carg.atmos.washington.edu/

    Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #56
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    Oct 2003
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    Seattle
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    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post
    Reid Turner Blackburn (August 11, 1952 – May 18, 1980) was an American photographer killed in the 1980 volcanic eruption of Mount St. Helens.[1] A photojournalist covering the eruption for a local newspaper—the Vancouver, Washington Columbian[2]—as well as National Geographic magazine[3] and the United States Geological Survey,[4] he was caught at Coldwater Camp in the blast.[5][6]
    The other two guys that made it out were Keith Ronnholm and Gary Rosenquist.
    https://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/msh/catastrophic.html

  7. #57
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    Dec 2005
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    3,284
    Wow really interesting pics KQ thanks for posting.

  8. #58
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    Oct 2008
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    Wenatchee
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    I was cutting brush and we heard a muffled explosion. We thought someone was blowing stumps, this was in northern Snohomish county and not uncommon. We got a call from my stepdad who was at the airport doing maintenance and cleaning on his Cessna Cardinal. He said that St. Helens had blown and that we should meet him at the Arlington airport.

    We flew down and refueled in Vancouver and then spent an hour or so flying around the outside of the plume. It was pretty amazing, there were chunks of rock probably as big as cars falling out of the plume. My mom got some really great pics and had one on the cover of a couple local papers and a post card. Iíll have to try and find some.

    One of the most memorable experiences of my life.


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  9. #59
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    Nov 2006
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    Seattle
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    Ballsy to fly that day!
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  10. #60
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    Sep 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    I was cutting brush and we heard a muffled explosion. We thought someone was blowing stumps, this was in northern Snohomish county and not uncommon. We got a call from my stepdad who was at the airport doing maintenance and cleaning on his Cessna Cardinal. He said that St. Helens had blown and that we should meet him at the Arlington airport.

    We flew down and refueled in Vancouver and then spent an hour or so flying around the outside of the plume. It was pretty amazing, there were chunks of rock probably as big as cars falling out of the plume. My mom got some really great pics and had one on the cover of a couple local papers and a post card. Iíll have to try and find some.

    One of the most memorable experiences of my life.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Wow man. Please post the photos if you find them.
    life ain't guaranteed, love your people while you can

  11. #61
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    Oct 2008
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    There were a lot of small planes flying in that area, that and news helicopters.


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  12. #62
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    Aug 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peruvian View Post
    I skied from the crater rim 20 years ago, April 30th.
    Which direction? Into, or away from, the crater?

  13. #63
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    Gitchur peepee smacked big time for (getting caught) entering the crater. Heard of it done both on skis and sled, unverified
    life ain't guaranteed, love your people while you can

  14. #64
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    Nov 2008
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    743
    I used to date one of his relatives
    Quote Originally Posted by TBS View Post
    RIP to Bruce Faddis, my roommate for a year in college, who died on that mountain 40 years ago today.

  15. #65
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    Nov 2008
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    Me too! Same age and on our way to the air show at Fairchild.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dhelihiker View Post
    Probably one of my earliest memories as a human, 3 YO.

    4" of ash in Spokane 180 Miles away.

  16. #66
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    1
    I have spent six month working at MT. St. Helens from 2016 to 2018. This includes doing repairs on the 10 foot water diversion tunnel that you speak of, at 6000 feet in. The invert of the tunnel had a rise of about 3 feet and we removed that and replaced 30 feet of the invert.

    The water now runs down it, and into Cold Water creek, instead of the Tootle River. I have also spent 3 months working at the inlet on spirit lake. The picture is from the water diversion tunnel intake on spirit lake and my daily view for 3 months. The helicopter was our daily transportation. Made for the best commute to work each day that I have ever had. Just a beautiful trip to work.

    I feel this is by far the greatest and most enjoyable work I have ever gotten to do. Truly a beautiful and amazing place.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

  17. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    3,284
    Quote Originally Posted by klastinger View Post
    I have spent six month working at MT. St. Helens from 2016 to 2018. This includes doing repairs on the 10 foot water diversion tunnel that you speak of, at 6000 feet in. The invert of the tunnel had a rise of about 3 feet and we removed that and replaced 30 feet of the invert.

    The water now runs down it, and into Cold Water creek, instead of the Tootle River. I have also spent 3 months working at the inlet on spirit lake. The picture is from the water diversion tunnel intake on spirit lake and my daily view for 3 months. The helicopter was our daily transportation. Made for the best commute to work each day that I have ever had. Just a beautiful trip to work.

    I feel this is by far the greatest and most enjoyable work I have ever gotten to do. Truly a beautiful and amazing place.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
    Where could I read about what you are taking about - this water tunnel - sounds fascinating to me

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