Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 66
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    890

    New to the PNW. What bikes should I buy?

    Ok, so I just moved to Seattle from Texas with big plans for all kinds skiing, mountaineering, and biking and now. Zero. Nada. Zilch.

    So now, my mind is just rolling around thinking about what gear I'm going to want when I everything opens back up.

    Let's say I'm looking to get 2-3 bikes to fill out a quiver that can do all of the following:
    - Gravel riding (40-60mi) and occasional road rides (~40mi)
    - Mountain biking. Post-work or weekend warrior. I like XC flowy riding mostly and long ups for long downs, but enduro loops are also fun. I just suck at them, so maybe I just need practice.
    - Bikepacking. Mostly 1-2 nighters with the occasional 4-day trip. Think Gifford-Pinchot mix of gravel and trails.

    What would you get? Do I want a long travel FS to ride Tiger mountain? Also, what are some good weekend warrior MTB trails in the area?

    My initial thought is something like this:
    - 650b gravel bike with a second set of road wheels
    - Trek Stache or Surly Krampus 29+ bikepacking bike
    - Some 6" FS bike?? Honestly, I ride occasionally, but this is not my favorite kind of riding. So I'd be willing to compromise here, especially if I could get down to 2 bikes.


    FWIW I already own 3 bikes:
    - Diamondback Haanjo. 650b gravel bike, love this thing.
    - Fuji Jari. Setup as a road bike, but tempted to sell this bike and get a road wheelset for the Haanjo
    - 2014 Giant Trance Advanced. The Fox Float 32 CTD fork is sloppy on this for the riding I did in Oregon this summer. I could upgrade forks or get something else or I don't know? I really only ride this about once a month, but maybe that would change here.

    I'm really itching for a Trek Stache or something...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Can/USA
    Posts
    968
    3 new bikes?! You lucky bastard... this seems like a good time to buy a bike as I’m thinking there should be some deals to be had.

    i had an older Stache and I didn’t love it but honestly I don’t think I was using it to it’s full potential/ right use so I wouldn’t mind grabbing one again.

    ultimately it depends what you want to spend.... the Santa Cruz stigmata looks pretty cool to me for a gravel bike

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    890
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandbox View Post
    3 new bikes?! You lucky bastard... this seems like a good time to buy a bike as I’m thinking there should be some deals to be had.

    i had an older Stache and I didn’t love it but honestly I don’t think I was using it to it’s full potential/ right use so I wouldn’t mind grabbing one again.

    ultimately it depends what you want to spend.... the Santa Cruz stigmata looks pretty cool to me for a gravel bike
    Haha hell no I'm not buying 3 new bikes. Just dreaming about what the perfect 3 bike quiver could look like. Nothing else to really do.

    What do you ride now?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    551
    Salsa Cutthroat for gravel, road and bikepacking.

    Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Rossland BC
    Posts
    1,211
    Itís possible that mountain biking in the NW might prove accessible and engaging enough that you wonít want to waste your time on gravel or bike packing. Iíd suggest spending some time on a modern bike on some quality trails before investing.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    890
    Quote Originally Posted by kootenayskier View Post
    It’s possible that mountain biking in the NW might prove accessible and engaging enough that you won’t want to waste your time on gravel or bike packing. I’d suggest spending some time on a modern bike on some quality trails before investing.
    I know very little about FS mountain bikes. Is the geometry and suspension on my Giant so far outdated that I should look to upgrade?

    I love bikepacking for sure. Gravel biking is sort of a tweener activity.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Can/USA
    Posts
    968
    Quote Originally Posted by thejongiest View Post
    Haha hell no I'm not buying 3 new bikes. Just dreaming about what the perfect 3 bike quiver could look like. Nothing else to really do.

    What do you ride now?
    main ride is a Santa Cruz bronson
    Trek Farley fatbike
    and I have 2 bikes that are not currently together, pieced together from buddies, pink bike and the parts bin...
    Kona Jake the Snake that will be my path/gravel/brew tour maybe kid hauler
    Surley Instigator I’m probably gonna turn into a dirt jumper type

    probably 2 summers before I upgrade my main rig

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    livin the dream
    Posts
    3,730

    New to the PNW. What bikes should I buy?

    Sell your Fuji
    Sell your Giant
    Get a nice road wheel set for your gravel bike.
    Get a modern 130-140mm 29er (you donít need any more travel than this unless you are sending ever feature on the toughest trails in the region)
    Get whatever you want for bikepacking

    Advice from a guy with a 2013 Bronson and a shitty steel road bike. But Iíll be building up a 130mm 29er as soon as finances make sense...

    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    2,899
    So many choices, but a mid travel 29” is a good start. For the PNW - obviously has to be a transition smuggler. 140f/120r, modern aggressive growth, cool brand and you’ll fit in perfectly!
    Do I detect a lot of anger flowing around this place? Kind of like a pubescent volatility, some angst, a lot of I'm-sixteen-and-angry-at-my-father syndrome?

    fuck that noise.

    gmen.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    890
    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    Sell your Fuji
    Sell your Giant
    Get a nice road wheel set for your gravel bike.
    Get a modern 130-140mm 29er (you don’t need any more travel than this unless you are sending ever feature on the toughest trails in the region)
    Get whatever you want for bikepacking

    Advice from a guy with a 2013 Bronson and a shitty steel road bike. But I’ll be building up a 130mm 29er as soon as finances make sense...

    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    This was my original line of thought...

    Why a mid-travel vs. 150/160mm? I guess I just need to do some test rides...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,406
    Since you’re on the fence about how much you want to mountain bike, I’d keep riding the Trance. It’s still a decent bike by today’s standards and shouldn’t take away from your enjoyment (I am assuming your bike is the first-generation 27.5 Trance, right?). You could consider upgrading the fork - a good fork to look for if you’re on a budget is an older Pike in good shape, probably with 150 or 160 mm travel, which will be a huge step up from your 32. And throw on some proper tires, if you haven’t already. I certainly wouldn’t put a ton of money into that bike, though.

    If you keep wanting to mountain bike once a month a so, the Trance with a decent fork will likely do the trick. If you start doing it and decide you love it, then you can upgrade.

    No clue about the other types of riding you’ve mentioned.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    890
    Quote Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
    Since you’re on the fence about how much you want to mountain bike, I’d keep riding the Trance. It’s still a decent bike by today’s standards and shouldn’t take away from your enjoyment (I am assuming your bike is the first-generation 27.5 Trance, right?). You could consider upgrading the fork - a good fork to look for if you’re on a budget is an older Pike in good shape, probably with 150 or 160 mm travel, which will be a huge step up from your 32. And throw on some proper tires, if you haven’t already. I certainly wouldn’t put a ton of money into that bike, though.

    If you keep wanting to mountain bike once a month a so, the Trance with a decent fork will likely do the trick. If you start doing it and decide you love it, then you can upgrade.

    No clue about the other types of riding you’ve mentioned.
    Yes, I was looking at that. I have the 1st gen, which I believe is the same as the 2015 Trance SX which had a 160mm Pike. Should I try an upgrade the rear shock too?

    And how much should I expect to pay for a used Pike fork?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Down In A Hole, Up in the Sky
    Posts
    27,234
    You should seriously consider buying my Rocky Mountain Altitude C90.
    Forum Cross Pollinator

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    livin the dream
    Posts
    3,730
    Quote Originally Posted by thejongiest View Post
    This was my original line of thought...

    Why a mid-travel vs. 150/160mm? I guess I just need to do some test rides...
    The modern mid travel 29ers are as much fun going downhill as the long travel 27.5s of 5-10 years ago, but they pedal better.

    The modern long travel 27.5s are built like new era freeride bikes. IE downhill thrashers that you can still climb with.

    The modern long travel 29ers are EWS race machines. They are so big and long you need to be on your game and going mach-loonie to jive with the bike...


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Driggs
    Posts
    174
    Three bikes?

    MTB: Transition Smuggler (or Sentinel if you wanna get a little more sendy)
    Gravel: Kona Sutra LTD. What's with the 650b love on gravel bikes? I really don't understand. Sutra is a crazy deal, really capable, and can clear a 29x2.5 up front, and a 2.3 out back. I've ridden some mostly pavement centuries, as well as some really technical singletrack on mine. Also can run B+ tires (think it clears a 2.8) if you wanna get really weird.
    Hardtail/bikepacking: Surly Krampus for sure. I had a Stache and hated it, just a bad build, flexy as all hell, and generally not as fun to ride. Lady friend has a Krampus and it's a blast. She rides long-ass, technical bikepacking routes on it, but I still love to steal it and ride flow trails at the resort on it to. Can't over-sell that bike. Hell, local kid has a Krampus set up as a dirt jumper, and it's rowdy. He rides everything on Teton Pass with with it, and it's still a great bikepacking rig.

    Two bikes? Cut the trail bike since apparently that's not your jam, put a suspension fork and a dropper on your Krampus, and party on. I could live in Squamish and be pretty happy owning just an overbuilt Krampus. Never ridden in Seattle but I bet it's similar.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Stumptown
    Posts
    6,124
    What are your price ranges? For gravel the Salsa Warbird could be an interesting option. Saw one built up in the sub 20 lb range.

    I have a 650b Journeyman and it will take 700c wheels also. Depending on the build it could do double duty as gravel and bike packing.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    2,899
    Just to expand on things: Having ridden about 20-30 days in the PNW and now moving full time:
    If I were doing 2 mountain bikes:
    Mildly aggressive hardtail/short travel FS 29 for true trail days and a longish travel 27.5/29 for getting rowdy (my personal combo)

    A gravel and a mtb:

    A gravel (don’t know shit about these) and a mid-ish travel 29 (Smuggler, sb130, stumpy, Ripmo, maybe optic, too many choices to list but 120-140 rear and 130-150 front m)
    Do I detect a lot of anger flowing around this place? Kind of like a pubescent volatility, some angst, a lot of I'm-sixteen-and-angry-at-my-father syndrome?

    fuck that noise.

    gmen.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    890
    Quote Originally Posted by cydwhit View Post
    Three bikes?

    MTB: Transition Smuggler (or Sentinel if you wanna get a little more sendy)
    Gravel: Kona Sutra LTD. What's with the 650b love on gravel bikes? I really don't understand. Sutra is a crazy deal, really capable, and can clear a 29x2.5 up front, and a 2.3 out back. I've ridden some mostly pavement centuries, as well as some really technical singletrack on mine. Also can run B+ tires (think it clears a 2.8) if you wanna get really weird.
    Hardtail/bikepacking: Surly Krampus for sure. I had a Stache and hated it, just a bad build, flexy as all hell, and generally not as fun to ride. Lady friend has a Krampus and it's a blast. She rides long-ass, technical bikepacking routes on it, but I still love to steal it and ride flow trails at the resort on it to. Can't over-sell that bike. Hell, local kid has a Krampus set up as a dirt jumper, and it's rowdy. He rides everything on Teton Pass with with it, and it's still a great bikepacking rig.

    Two bikes? Cut the trail bike since apparently that's not your jam, put a suspension fork and a dropper on your Krampus, and party on. I could live in Squamish and be pretty happy owning just an overbuilt Krampus. Never ridden in Seattle but I bet it's similar.
    Thanks for the info. Was it just the components on the Stache you didn't like or something about the geo?

    I don't have any particular love for 650b gravel bikes, but that's what I have and it's got some sentimental value at this point so it'll probably stay in the stable.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    9,365
    Gravel grinding is for people that live in the midwest. And Texas. You don't live in Texas anymore - ditch the gravel rig. Buy a real mountain bike and don't look back.

    Tranny smuggler would be a good option.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    In a parallel universe
    Posts
    4,799
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    Gravel grinding is for people that live in the midwest. And Texas. You don't live in Texas anymore - ditch the gravel rig. Buy a real mountain bike and don't look back.

    Tranny smuggler would be a good option.
    While I donít disagree with this generally speaking, the gg is actually pretty good in the WA cascades, and it provides an early season option that melts off earlier in some zones. I wouldnít rule it out, especially if you are wanting to do something that isnít trailhead oriented and will get you away from others.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    137
    Riding up here in the PNW?? Everything here is Gnar, there are no XC trails.. Be Prepared to get Sendy...

    Santa Cruz Nomad
    Santa Cruz Mega-Tower
    Yeti SB-150
    Transition Patrol.

    Want it to climb better? Carbon wheels, and put a set of rollers in your garage to get more fit... Otherwise those will do it all..

    /end thread

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Driggs
    Posts
    174
    Quote Originally Posted by thejongiest View Post
    Thanks for the info. Was it just the components on the Stache you didn't like or something about the geo?

    I don't have any particular love for 650b gravel bikes, but that's what I have and it's got some sentimental value at this point so it'll probably stay in the stable.
    Build on the cheap Stache is garbage for sure, but the Surly isn't really better. Geo is really similar on both bikes. The elevated chainstays on the Stache mean that the frame will never really be stiff. Combine that with the traction of a 3" tire and it felt like I was folding the bike in half any time I cornered aggressively.

    I have never been a huge believer in the "steel has a better ride quality than AL" thing, but maybe that's why the Krampus feels so much damper and more capable?

    Basically, at low speeds and mellow terrain, both bikes are fine, and feel similar. The faster you're going, and the more "real" mountain biking you're doing, the more the Krampus pulls ahead. Same thing for bikepacking. My Stache felt terrible fully loaded. Krampus settles into the load and feels awesome.

    And there's this cult around the Krampus where neckbeards in the midwest build them up with nice wheels and components and then sell them for really cheap. So you can get cool used ones for a steal.

    Personally, I've bailed on 29+ entirely and just have an agro 29er hardtail for coaching and bikepacking. That way I've got 100% part compatibility with my trail bike.

    But like everybody else said, you live in one of the better mountain biking places. Get a Smuggler, forget you own other bikes, party on.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Eastern WA
    Posts
    504
    I second the Patrol not a bad climbing bike and for me it takes care of anything I will ever do going downhill (I dont jump) Do not count out gravel rides ! The FS roads in the cascades and in my area we have gravel farm roads for DAYS. I built up a old hardtail MTB with a 100mm fork for gravel...washboards are hell after a while!

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    9,365
    Moving to the PNW and worrying about what gravel bike to buy is like moving to Japan and worrying about what nordic skis to buy.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the ham
    Posts
    7,541
    I see a lot of them around here, but always think 'why?'

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •