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Thread: Garden 2020

  1. #26
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    Dec 2008
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    Nashville TN
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boissal View Post
    Return of the snow in SLC also. The arugula patch had already tripled in size during the warm spell. Gotta take the weed-wacker to it, it's as aggressive as mint when it comes to colonizing space in the yard.
    and will self seed too if you let it go to flower. I did that in a raised bed one year over a set of pavers, and the next year arugula is growing up between the pavers.

  2. #27
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    Nov 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Mike View Post
    and will self seed too if you let it go to flower. I did that in a raised bed one year over a set of pavers, and the next year arugula is growing up between the pavers.
    I've had that issue with oregano and chives
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  3. #28
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    Nov 2005
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    Making the Bowl Great Again
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    My neighbor's front yard is half chives, all volunteer. I'm not complaining.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    My neighbor's front yard is half chives, all volunteer. I'm not complaining.
    Bet that's pretty when it blooms and pungent on warm days. Love the little chive blossoms!
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  5. #30
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    Jan 2009
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    SLC
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    Hot and windy in SLC, un-inspiring skiing at best, might as well prep the yard to grow food for the upcoming apocalypse. We dumped a couple yards of compost and tilled it in all. Ms Boissal getting her arms pumped working the tiller while old man Bosco supervises:

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    We relocated the invasive arugula to the greens plot, it had already colonized 4 or 5 new areas. The main plot is ready for planting:

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    We found out some carrots and radishes that didn't do too well last year were coming out with a vengance. The onions, shallots, and the garlic are all poking their heads out already. Hopefully we don't get another hard frost...

  6. #31
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    Nov 2002
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    Behind the Zion Curtain
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    I had the same thoughts, went to the cleared out Smiths by us and figured if we’re locked down I’d need something to do. At least the seeds weren’t cleared out.

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  7. #32
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    Mar 2017
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    SLC, Utah
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    @boissal, any way i can borrow your roto tiller? will pay you in good beer or booze

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    @boissal, any way i can borrow your roto tiller? will pay you in good beer or booze
    It's a Home Depot rental. We looked into buying one but it's hard to find anything worthy under $250 and that's when they're on serious sale. Rental is $45 for 4 hours (there are cheaper models but we get one that does a 12" wide strip about 6" deep) and we don't have to worry about maintenance or storage (which is cruelly lacking at the house). We set everything up for tilling (spread compost, remove wood chips, pull all the plastic covers, etc...) then run to HD and furiously till for 3 hours and 45 minutes which is enough to get a lot done. Sat I did the whole garden, 3 new garden strips that were under wood chips and plastic ground cover, and leveled a 40'-long berm.

  9. #34
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    Mar 2017
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    SLC, Utah
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boissal View Post
    It's a Home Depot rental. We looked into buying one but it's hard to find anything worthy under $250 and that's when they're on serious sale. Rental is $45 for 4 hours (there are cheaper models but we get one that does a 12" wide strip about 6" deep) and we don't have to worry about maintenance or storage (which is cruelly lacking at the house). We set everything up for tilling (spread compost, remove wood chips, pull all the plastic covers, etc...) then run to HD and furiously till for 3 hours and 45 minutes which is enough to get a lot done. Sat I did the whole garden, 3 new garden strips that were under wood chips and plastic ground cover, and leveled a 40'-long berm.
    oh rad!! yeah we'll totally do that. where did you buy your compost from? thanks for the tips

  10. #35
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    Dec 2008
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    Nashville TN
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    Espalier fruit trees blooming nicely. Hopefully no late freeze.


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  11. #36
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    Dec 2008
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    Nashville TN
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    The other side (pear and apple here).


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  12. #37
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    Mar 2017
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    SLC, Utah
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    ^ beautiful, how old are these fruit trees? and you're in TN, right?

  13. #38
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    Jan 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    oh rad!! yeah we'll totally do that. where did you buy your compost from? thanks for the tips
    Oquirrh Mountain Compost Products on 800W and 3200S-ish. They have bags and bulk, the good stuff is $40 a yard, less good stuff with more composted wood chips is $20 a yard. Not sure about bags, we go in there with the trailer and load it up. They also have cheap wood chips if you don't get those free through the city.

    You probably want to read their info section about how the compost is produced as some people find it repulsive and won't go near the stuff. I've been using the stuff for about 10 years for all manners of plant life (including all my veggies), it's like crack.

  14. #39
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    Dec 2008
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    Nashville TN
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    ^ beautiful, how old are these fruit trees? and you're in TN, right?
    yes, TN. Fruit production varies year to year. It's too humid here for most fruits to thrive, but at least one of the 4 has done ok each year I have had them. Last year was the best year I have had for apples. I probably got about 20, and the squirrels got a similar number.

    I have had the pear and apples about 6 years. I bought them already trained, but they have filled out a lot. Probably 1/3 more size/volume than when I purchased. I am working on the 2 plums and 2 peaches myself. I bought them very small((in 5 gallon buckets), and I think this is either year 3 or 4.

  15. #40
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    Mar 2005
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    Dystopia
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    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post
    LOL! You can buy them now from this gal: Meowy Janes. I'm just copying her idea.
    $10.50 per nug?

    I’m in the wrong business
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.”
    Hunter S. Thompson

  16. #41
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    Feb 2008
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    My pear tree thrived for many years and still does when I clean my fish tank and pour the crap water on the root base.

    I bet a bunch of folks start gardens this year with sketchy food delivery and stores getting cleaned out by the hordes of locusts.
    watch out for snakes

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    I smell poutine!!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boissal View Post
    Oquirrh Mountain Compost Products on 800W and 3200S-ish. They have bags and bulk, the good stuff is $40 a yard, less good stuff with more composted wood chips is $20 a yard. Not sure about bags, we go in there with the trailer and load it up. They also have cheap wood chips if you don't get those free through the city.

    You probably want to read their info section about how the compost is produced as some people find it repulsive and won't go near the stuff. I've been using the stuff for about 10 years for all manners of plant life (including all my veggies), it's like crack.
    Sounds like it's the good shit.

  18. #43
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    Feb 2008
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    here and there
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    Got my tiller running, had to swap out the air filter with the one on the pos mower. Worked up the remaining part not planted with garlic prior to the rains moving in again.

    Neighbor has got a bunch of stuff going from seed already. Gonna plant the overflow in my plot. May try to get some plants from local farm also.

    That compost from last fall sure looks and smells good.
    watch out for snakes

  19. #44
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    Nov 2002
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    Behind the Zion Curtain
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    Yesterday I formulated a plan of driving up to Snowbird in the morning, sneaking in, filling my bird feeder, and then pick up the on-line order I submitted at Lowes.

    I drove up to Snowbird and it was apparent it was going to be a no go, called and spoke to public safety and for as much as they wanted to let me do it, no dice. The birds will have to be hungry till next weekend at least. I brought skis with me and a drive up to Alta quickly changed those plans. I’m not usually big on hiking uphill and doing it with a plethora of possible virus vectors definitely was not in the plans.

    So, Lowes it was. I’ve been wanting to plant the garden in these times of no skiing but the new dog isn’t playing nice with my raised beds. She tends to use them as footpaths to where she wants to get in the yard, so I’ve been needing fencing. The wife isn’t keen on me going into stores with people that don’t even seem concerned with their own well being so we settled on an on-line order.

    I got back from my failed feeder rescue mission and switched out the sedan for the truck, donned a pair of nitrile gloves and off to Lowes. It worked out way better than I was hoping, I was able to hit up a counter in the front of the store and process my purchase with minimal interaction. They had a cart loaded with my 100’ of rolled fencing, posts, and 15 bags of steer manure compost.

    Halfway to the truck the fencing rolled off and the posts went their separate ways, I was undeterred in my purpose. It felt good to get it home, walk 15 bags into my back yard and forget about shit for a moment or two. I put up a crappy fence, jumped on a shovel for a bit, spread some manure and got my hands in the dirt.

    Got the 8 yo off his Ipad and had him help me spread some manure, and then plant some peas and radishes. Happy to have the garden season started.

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  20. #45
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    Sep 2006
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    Hesitant to start with seeds, but I hear Home Depot is swamped all day er day.

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Tahoe-ish
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    822
    We've been getting after it with planting early seeds and getting the raised beds ready. As we do every year, we're expanding. We ate potatoes from last year tonight, and still have some okra, corn, and tomatoes in the freezer.

    The HD here (Carson City, NV) is very slow. I'm a contractor, and typically go there more than 2x/week, and I've never seen so many employees there just standing around trying to help people. Shelves were fully stocked (except for masks, of course).
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  22. #47
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    Feb 2008
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    here and there
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    The local plant and land scape farm is still in business. They have some herb and veggie plants but it’s early and last week the supplier did not show up.

    Dug out the grow light and have the plants under it getting stronger. Also got a bunch of air pots and potting soil for container growing. Adding house plants and shelving for them.
    watch out for snakes

  23. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Nashville TN
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    696
    Quote Originally Posted by SB View Post
    The local plant and land scape farm is still in business. They have some herb and veggie plants but it’s early and last week the supplier did not show up.

    Dug out the grow light and have the plants under it getting stronger. Also got a bunch of air pots and potting soil for container growing. Adding house plants and shelving for them.
    My local is still open too, but they have gone to all online ordering and then drive up pickup. It's a little grabbagish as a result. For example, I could order heirloom tomatoes, but I couldn't specify type, thus I'll be giving Mr. Stripey, Old German and Mortgage Lifter a whirl this year for the first time.

    I have lettuce, snow peas, carrots and chard seeds poking above ground. Transplanted cabbage yesterday.

    Various paste and cherry tomatoes that I grew from seed are on the front porch hardening off. Also got basil, a couple of jalapenos and bush beans at the local place. All that will go into the ground in the next couple of weeks.

  24. #49
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    Sep 2006
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    4,730
    Mr. Stripeys are fucking awesome. Did those two years ago. They tend to develop cracks if you let them get dry and then over-water. But the flavor is awesome, produced a lot.

  25. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
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    Behind the Zion Curtain
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    Put in an order with my local nursery today, they filled it and brought it non contact stylie out to my car.

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    31 walla walla onions planted, 8 strawberries planted.

    Potatoes going in tomorrow.

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