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Thread: Garden 2020

  1. #751
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    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover View Post
    I just learned yesterday that bell peppers are perennials. It gets pretty cold here, single digits to zero at least a few times, so how do I preserve them? Just let them die off and they come back? Cut them back and let them sprout from the base next year?
    Not just Bells but all peppers. They won't come back if they freeze.

    Couple years ago I experimented with digging them up and potting for the winter. Brought them to my office to be under the big skylights and they grew just ok. The Paprika was the most robust and actually set fruit (had to hand-pollinate) but the others just sorta languished. They need a lot of sun and heat, not just air temp but warm soil, too. They'd do well in a real greenhouse, I bet.
    life ain't guaranteed, love your people while you can

  2. #752
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    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover View Post
    The tomatoes I planted late are growing so well but not flowering at all. The weather here really cooled off the last week or so, do they need warmth to start setting fruit or will they even with night temps in the high 40s and daytime in the low to mid 70s? I think the critters are appreciating my peppers a little bit too much. Every day they take the ones that are a week or so into growing so a half dozen a day are disappearing.

    I just learned yesterday that bell peppers are perennials. It gets pretty cold here, single digits to zero at least a few times, so how do I preserve them? Just let them die off and they come back? Cut them back and let them sprout from the base next year?
    Most flowering is very dependant on photoperiod, with temp and other factors being secondary. I don't have the numbers in my head, but the daylight hours (or more often the dark hours) have to be right to stimulate flowering. Google should be able to help you there. And then either move the plants to a light source or put out a full spectrum light near the plants and try playing with their photoperiod, as the nights get longer (too long now for the plant to want to produce fruit)

  3. #753
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    Awesome haul, Norseman. We're just limping along with a few cherry toms maturing, but the basil has been robust and fostered a good pestofest 2020.
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  4. #754
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    Well that makes sense. At least I have some great looking plants growing keeping the garden looking gardenish.

  5. #755
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    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover View Post
    The tomatoes I planted late are growing so well but not flowering at all. The weather here really cooled off the last week or so, do they need warmth to start setting fruit or will they even with night temps in the high 40s and daytime in the low to mid 70s? I think the critters are appreciating my peppers a little bit too much. Every day they take the ones that are a week or so into growing so a half dozen a day are disappearing.

    I just learned yesterday that bell peppers are perennials. It gets pretty cold here, single digits to zero at least a few times, so how do I preserve them? Just let them die off and they come back? Cut them back and let them sprout from the base next year?

    I'm also thinking about overwintering my pepper plants. I've never tried it before either, so good luck to you—and me.

  6. #756
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    Garden 2020

    I had a cayenne pepper in a pot that I kept for three years,brought it inside every winter and put it out in the spring. Threw some fertilizer in the pot now and then and had a banger harvest every year.

    Still scoring a decent amount every day.

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    Grilled up and sealed a gang of anchos last night.

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  7. #757
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    I left 3 broccoli plants to flower and go to seed. They flowered and had all sortsa cool pollinators around them but they didn't go to seed, instead they started putting on new heads, like a whole second round with small and med sized florets all over with 18" long flowery stems sticking up. It's pretty cool.

    I like fall gardens, fewer bugs.
    Last edited by gravitylover; 09-27-2020 at 04:25 PM. Reason: spelling

  8. #758
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    What are you seeing for autumn? Have been enjoying this tiger eye sumac recently Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #759
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    Quote Originally Posted by CascadeLuke View Post
    What are you seeing for autumn? Have been enjoying this tiger eye sumac recently Click image for larger version. 

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    wow, that's beautiful!! what a cool leaf shape.

    we have fall greens coming up, tons of tomatoes on the vine, and cucumbers still strong. also more zucchini than we know what to do with.

    our super hot peppers won't ripen - kinda bummed on that one; any tips for getting peppers to ripen?

    i'll snap pics later today/tomorrow to share

  10. #760
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    Garden 2020

    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    wow, that's beautiful!! what a cool leaf shape.

    we have fall greens coming up, tons of tomatoes on the vine, and cucumbers still strong. also more zucchini than we know what to do with.

    our super hot peppers won't ripen - kinda bummed on that one; any tips for getting peppers to ripen?

    i'll snap pics later today/tomorrow to share
    Envious. We didn’t get much garden established at a new home, worked on landscape.
    Props to Norseman though, went up thread and he’s rolling.

    On these tiger eyes, warning that they have a reputation of aggressive offshoots. Found this out after placing 3 in ground in different spots as small specimen. Luckily found out through reading further and not irl. Look forward to one day planting them on a wide open property and watching what happens over time.

  11. #761
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    Fucking sumac are WEEDS.

  12. #762
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    Dug up some beets today, pretty good haul for a second harvest. Had one whopper, 2 pounds 7 ounces. Roasting them, chopping, sealing and freezing.

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    Cucumbers are still firing so I made 6 jars of pickles today. Water bathed 4 jars and left 2 for fridge pickles.

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    Carrot pulling and freezing is up next. Probably going to plant some radishes tomorrow.

  13. #763
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    ^^goddamn bobmc, that's a proper fucking beet!! what are you planning on doing with it?

    Carolina Reapers are ripening finally!!

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  14. #764
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    Umm...

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  15. #765
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    ha, sorry, I didn't realize you were just gonna eat 'em roasted.

    we also roast (or parboil) beets to process them, but that's just the beginning. mrs tgapp, being a ruski, likes to shred them and then serve them with pickled herring and meat jello to make a dish whose name translated means 'herring in a fur coat' (worse than it sounds honestly), or we mix em with peas and mayonnaise and potatoes to make a cold salad or of course, borsch. the possibilities are endless, even if some of them are a little unappetizing.

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  16. #766
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    I don’t think I’ve had much - if any Russian cuisine. Sounds interesting.

    Great stuff in this thread. Good job y’all.

  17. #767
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    Bump for end of season stoke.

    We have a hard freeze in the forecast for Sunday night with shitty weather before that so it's time to finally pull the plug on the garden for the year.
    Yesterday night Ms Boissal and I gave thanks to the plants and to the earth goddess and started the great takedown. Dozens of micro squashes went to the chickens, the stupid plant spent the entire season growing vines and only started putting out fruits 3 weeks ago, I think we'll get 1 normal-sized winter squash out of it. I picked a ton of blossoms at least, gonna try to stuff them so the plant's efforts have not been in vain. There was a surprising amount of new peppers despite lows in the 40s at night lately. Shishito galore will continue for a few more weeks. Some hidden zucchs and cucs were harvested along with a few mini-melons. Another 20ish lbs of tomatoes were picked, most fully ripe with some stragglers that will catch up. The 20+ lbs left on the vine are fully green and will go to the compost after they freeze.

    All in all it was a very solid season. It started early with the first tomatoes eaten before the end of June, the garden weathered the extreme heat and drought well, the massive wind storm didn't do as much damage as I feared, and the extended season really delivered, I think this might the latest we've kept things going.
    Ms Boissal estimated the canning total to be around 160 lbs for tomatoes only which should take us through the next 8 months of fresh-veggie desert.

    See you all in here next spring!

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  18. #768
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boissal View Post
    Bump for end of season stoke.

    We have a hard freeze in the forecast for Sunday night with shitty weather before that so it's time to finally pull the plug on the garden for the year.
    Yesterday night Ms Boissal and I gave thanks to the plants and to the earth goddess and started the great takedown. Dozens of micro squashes went to the chickens, the stupid plant spent the entire season growing vines and only started putting out fruits 3 weeks ago, I think we'll get 1 normal-sized winter squash out of it. I picked a ton of blossoms at least, gonna try to stuff them so the plant's efforts have not been in vain. There was a surprising amount of new peppers despite lows in the 40s at night lately. Shishito galore will continue for a few more weeks. Some hidden zucchs and cucs were harvested along with a few mini-melons. Another 20ish lbs of tomatoes were picked, most fully ripe with some stragglers that will catch up. The 20+ lbs left on the vine are fully green and will go to the compost after they freeze.

    All in all it was a very solid season. It started early with the first tomatoes eaten before the end of June, the garden weathered the extreme heat and drought well, the massive wind storm didn't do as much damage as I feared, and the extended season really delivered, I think this might the latest we've kept things going.
    Ms Boissal estimated the canning total to be around 160 lbs for tomatoes only which should take us through the next 8 months of fresh-veggie desert.

    See you all in here next spring!

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    Very nice haul. We're going to do the same thing in the next couple of days. We'll prob end up with 30# of green tomatoes, many of which will slowly ripen in the house. We didn't get any until August, though, so the early season cold really hurt our yield.

    Luckily all of our peppers are in containers and will soon occupy the newly expanded sunroom, so they'll keep rolling until at least December. It's been a strange year, with some usual stars (okra, eggplant) being lame and some (melons, corn) doing really well.

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  19. #769
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    I pulled everything I could find before the freeze, have a bunch of green tomatoes in the garage now.

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    After the killing freeze I went out and it was easy to find the hidden stuff.

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    It just looks sad out there now, I still have lettuce, parsley, green onions, rosemary, carrots, beets and chives that survived.

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    Made some cowboy candy today (candied jalapeños), most of the peppers were from recently so I figured they wouldn't be that hot. Figured that wrong, tried one after jarring them and hiccups and eyes watering occurred, Hopefully they chill out a bit after a week in the fridge.

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  20. #770
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    Man, this warmth has been great for the stuff I still have going. Tomatoes popped and there's easily 40-50 of them on three plants, carrots are going bonkers and even though all the leaves turned and are falling off the strawberry plants they flowered and started setting fruit again and the potatoes, holy shit the potatoes are going crazy. The sweet potato vine went from maybe two feet tall to 5 in just a few days so hopefully we get some for Thanksgiving.

  21. #771
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    We just called it on the tomatoes thanks to the forecast for 18 tonight.

    ~45# of green. They are delicious cooked as though they were squash or whatever, and many will ripen over the next month.

    We also have a 5gal bucket full of mostly not ripe melons. We covered the butternut plants with double moving blankets in hopes that they will make it through and get a bit more maturation.

    It was a weird garden year, for sure.Click image for larger version. 

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    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  22. #772
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    What do you guys do with your beds over winter?

    Do you leave some of the scraps, leaves, roots, etc. to break down over the winter or do you clean up your beds?

    My second year soil did way better than year one obviously.


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  23. #773
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    There has been some great hauls recorded here this season. Kudos.

    Put everything to bed this weekend and last. Hoping the forecast plays out so I can get in the garlic. Primed compost is into the bed ready for it, frost chunks and all! Going to have to have a hot water dunk to hopefully kill off the white rot that attacked us this year. Only recovered 1/2 the yield this year And no softnecks, so begged some softneck replacements from Dad's harvest.

    All the garden biomass sorted in their place. Lots of veg this season from the flower gardens contributing. Early snow took out a bit, including a nice sumac, but the plum and apple trees are ready for the forecast of a snowy year. Some carrots heeled to see how they tolerate the winter. Irrigation pulled and drained.

  24. #774
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK47bp View Post
    What do you guys do with your beds over winter?

    Do you leave some of the scraps, leaves, roots, etc. to break down over the winter or do you clean up your beds?

    My second year soil did way better than year one obviously.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    We don't do much. Nothing will break down here anyway, since it's either bone dry or frozen. The GF still insists that we "compost" our kitchen scraps, but without watering it the pile just kind of sits there.

    We buy a yard or two of compost from the local place and work it into the top few inches in each bed before planting each year. We rotate what goes in each bed, and try to rotate potato areas as well, but now that we have 3 sixteen foot rows of them, we're running out of places to leave fallow. Next year we might fence in a new area for corn and potatoes.

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    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  25. #775
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    Cool. Yea I did an early spring (marchish) compost mix in that seemed to really help. I’m in western WA so things turn to mush and break down pretty well.


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