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Thread: Garden 2020

  1. #226
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    Quote Originally Posted by The AD View Post
    Starting to get things organized in the garden Still a work in progress.
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    Noice, when I have time next year I am going to make raised beds like yours. Your yard looks great.
    Quote Originally Posted by leroy jenkins View Post
    I think you'd have an easier time understanding people if you remembered that 80% of them are fucking morons.
    That is why I like dogs, more than most people.

  2. #227
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    tgapp, there are stinkbugs, slugs and aphids to watch out for where we live in Millcreek. We buy praying mantis and a bag of ladybugs, I'm not sure what to do with aphids though, anyone else have a plan with those?

    As for the gravel pit, if you don't put a bed there, rake the gravel into a pile, add some thick random cardboard you have laying around evenly, then put down the stupid expensive weed barrier from a place like Millcreek gardens, not from Home Depot, then rake gravel back. Or add stones or whatever you want. I hate mulch because it turns to dirt and weeds then grow in it in a few years.

    Drip system my wife put in so I'm clueless on advice.

  3. #228
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    Watering (Boissal/BobMC) - so I have a fuckton of parts for a drip irrigation system but i'm a little overwhelmed by this. If anyone in SLC wants to come help, I will pay you in delicious alcohol, baked goods, and "baked" goods. Until I figure out watering, I do it all by hand.
    Check around this post: https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...26#post5986926

    BobMC def has some very good advice.

    I'm about to go through this myself, and I 1st figured out how many gal/m my water supply was (fill a 5 gal bucket and time it, then calculate) - this helped me determine, roughly, how many zones I was going to need with a rough estimate of how many drip lines I'd need.

    I still need to get the gear - all I have presently is the zone control/timer. These two URL's are pretty informative:

    https://help.dripdepot.com/support/s...igation-system
    https://www.dripdepot.com/guides/dri...tion-guide.pdf

  4. #229
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    Quote Originally Posted by skaredshtles View Post
    Check around this post: https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...26#post5986926

    BobMC def has some very good advice.

    I'm about to go through this myself, and I 1st figured out how many gal/m my water supply was (fill a 5 gal bucket and time it, then calculate) - this helped me determine, roughly, how many zones I was going to need with a rough estimate of how many drip lines I'd need.

    I still need to get the gear - all I have presently is the zone control/timer. These two URL's are pretty informative:

    https://help.dripdepot.com/support/s...igation-system
    https://www.dripdepot.com/guides/dri...tion-guide.pdf
    I went with that same 4 zone controller used in that post for my wife's soaker hose system. I have been happy with it so far and would recommend. Easy to setup, very flexible, etc.
    "We had nice 3 days in your autonomous mountain realm last weekend." - Tom from Austria (the Rax ski guy)

  5. #230
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    Quote Originally Posted by liv2ski View Post
    Noice, when I have time next year I am going to make raised beds like yours. Your yard looks great.
    Thanks! I'm just showing you the good part. Overall it's still a bit of a mess.

  6. #231
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    im with the norseman its a hobby
    the mistakes, learning and experience is what I enjoy
    its like fishing or skiing there isn't always a catch or pow face shot harvest
    its time I enjoy spending
    cept not at midnight
    I did redo the low watt light patios systems

    but not to night garden
    youse 2 are way mur core than i
    weve been on this spread 9 years now
    ive grown corn aspargas tarragon and fennel
    but the last 2 got oc and the energy to pleasure ratio on the others wasn't cuttin it
    the cherry tree is on its last leg
    I crab apple got dug up and replaced with a trellis and grapes
    other ones going but I had other things to deal with this season
    pears 3 and doing great
    looks like well git a decent grape crop
    I prefer dig irrigation products over rainbird and others
    but most of its transferable
    I like flag drippers way better than buttons as they clog less and unclog easier when they do
    the uv's sure fuck with plastic
    and i run most of ours with the brown inline every 18'' gal an hour emitters as they rarely clog and our irrigation water is high particle dirty

    TGR app im headed out for the weekend but I can help ya sunday or afternoons next week
    I like bake goods or
    when we moved in the neighbors had a pile of rocks over the years it would receive new tarps as they weathered and disintegrated
    people would ask whats with the tarp and why cover rocks
    He planned on making a wall
    our house sits on the lot with less than 6' clearance on the sides
    So it would have really sucked as I walk around the drift boat on their property to access the backyard
    Weve always been good neighbors, its a midwest caltholic thing for us
    Both are chair /bed ridden now and have 24 hour private hospicesque care
    The wife cooks/preps our food for the week on sundays and has been bringing over a home cooked meal for them since their health deteriorated
    So them giving us their pile of granite was cool
    more so because the upper herb garden and patio is terraced with rotted rr ties and failing
    and I really didn't want to replace it with more nasty creosote coated ties
    got em all into the back yard on the CrossFit rock humpin program


    now I just gotta move em into place

    im tempted to take down the fence and bring in a bobcat but if not ill be needing some z drag winch help
    "When the child was a child it waited patiently for the first snow and it still does"- Van "The Man" Morrison
    "I find I have already had my reward, in the doing of the thing" - Buzz Holmstrom
    "THIS IS WHAT WE DO"-AML -ski on in eternal peace
    Yo poliassfuckers
    theres a special basement for your lame shit

  7. #232
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    Some awesome garden setups in this thread. Here's this year's effort for us. We've had the raised beds for a few years now but haven't had great yields lately. Had an issue years ago with pesticide tainted compost and we changed everything to what was sold as raised bed mix. Seemed too dense as we had a lot of stunted root veggies, things like carrots and onions didn't grow well.

    We are trying the square foot garden method this year, starting with a new mix for the beds. From the book, 1/3 compost, 1/3 peat moss, and 1/3 vermiculite. Click image for larger version. 

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    Seems to be working well, our lettuce has never looked better. These were all volunteers from last year's crop that the Mrs pulled and transplanted as we redid the bed mix. Click image for larger version. 

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    Overall it seems to be doing well. Next up is a trip to get more cedar to create trellises and something to stop the frigging squirrels from digging shit up. Click image for larger version. 

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  8. #233
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    Lookin for some insight, first off, have had 2 tomato and 2 pepper plants that we transplanted into the ground topped by something. Just a bare stem sticking out of the ground. Others nearby are fine, any ideas what that could be and what we could do to prevent the others from meeting the same demise?

    2nd, on our beans, squash, and other leafy plants out back, we've been getting holes in the leaves, nothing really along the edges, just right in the middle. Think a cayanne/dr. bronners mint/water solution would curb that?

    This is only our third year gardening, had a VERY dismal harvest last year but looking forward to this year, we've planted a lot more.
    "If we can't bring the mountain to the party, let's bring the PARTY to the MOUNTAIN!"

  9. #234
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    Apr 2004
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    And a fourth morning in a row with dense fog and heavy mist so everything is thoroughly soggy but only 1/8" into the ground so many of the plants actually need to be watered. The slug and snail baby population is out of hand and now the slugs are maturing from pink squishy nymphs to full blown veggie loving slimy disgusting pain in the ass critters in just a few hours. Fucking uggh.

  10. #235
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    They'll go back to the roost on their own, ya know...

    Or if it gets dark and they're still out, they'll pick a spot to roost. Then you can just walk up and grab them, since they can't see well in the dark and have slowed down their metabolism for the night.
    That was my take but these are Ms Boissal's first chicks and they are treated as the babies we'll never have. She monitors the temps in the coop hourly, checks food and water twice a day, and overall spends an unhealthy amount of time watching them. I keep telling her they'll be fine if it's 5 degrees colder than the recommended temp or if they're not back inside by curfew but she can't let go, she's convinced one of the cats will murder all of them. So I oblige and chase chickens around. They need to be handled more anyway so they get a bit less wild...

    SFB, nice work on the granite, those are meaty chunks to move around!! I've been extracting rocks from one of the talus piles in BCC to make borders all around the house (took out a bunch more grass and we use the rocks to contain woodchips), it's such a workout! I load a dozen pieces into my pack then do the equivalent of 50 squats just to get the fucker on my back. By the time I make it 200' to the car my knees are shot. Rinse and repeat 4 or 5 times then drink a beer and go home. Love the look of the red quartzite!

    Getting too hot already in SLC, the greens now have a shade cover and they are much happier. We almost lost the entire lettuce patch in one day. Looks ghetto as fook but it works... Still not 100% convinced about Ms B's approach of covering the whole ground in weed block, we'll see how that works.

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    In other news, I finally took down the big arugula bush that had grown completely out of control in a neglected corner of the yard. It was about 4' across, 3' tall, and fully flowered. I spent 45 minutes plucking leaves off stems that were up to 1/4" in diameter. The leaves have a very strong arugula flavor but they're not bitter and completely edible. They'll need a balsamic reduction dressing to sweeten things up a bit. If anyone's left their arugula go crazy before, have you tried to eat the pods that form just below the flowers (kinda visible in the pic below, that's the 1st of 3 handfuls of plucked stems)? Can't find much about using these but they look like a tiny green bean and taste just like a crunchy version of the leaves.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Boissal; 05-29-2020 at 01:33 PM.

  11. #236
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    They'll go back to the roost on their own, ya know...

    Or if it gets dark and they're still out, they'll pick a spot to roost. Then you can just walk up and grab them, since they can't see well in the dark and have slowed down their metabolism for the night.
    But, man, if they get imprinted on that alternate location for roosting it's a bitch to get them to go back home.

    I finally had to move this canoe around to the side yard and hide it under a tarp to get them to stop using the carport as their coop and this canoe as their roost.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  12. #237
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    Feb 2012
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    Garden 2020

    Got tomatoes, kale (just sprouting), zucchini, green beans, and strawberries in my tiny garden.


    Planted a bare root hybrid Apple tree in January that seems happy. Click image for larger version. 

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    I have some kale seeds sprouting inside Iíll transplant to the garden once again hey get a little hardier.

    The hummingbirds love the honeysuckles too.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  13. #238
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    5th soggy morning in a row, this one was due to excessively heavy rain at and just after sunset. I was prepared though, went and got this https://www.amazon.com/Monterey-LG65...000BWY3MS?th=1 yesterday and went out at 6am and drew some bigass slugs out for breakfast. I literally filled a 1# rubbermaid type container with hundreds of slugs and snail babies.

    Holy cow my cauliflower is killin' it! I think I can start harvesting greens now and potatoes next week.

  14. #239
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    Kewl stuff, I always had limited success with the saucer of beer method.


    Some great looking gardens!
    watch out for snakes

  15. #240
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    South garden, 1 of 4. And yes, we're late, the Cascade foothills are cold.
    3 tomato plants here, 2 rows of peas planted and a row of radishes. Holding off on the basil until June.



    The far edge is daylilies, gladiolas and dahlias with sluggo slug killer.

    Chives along the back. Took the purple flowers, chopped them up and put them on a potato, leek, smoked salmon and morel reduction soup.
    Last edited by Buster Highmen; 05-30-2020 at 10:43 AM.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
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  16. #241
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    our garden doesnít produce food...hopefully thatís ok in the thread

    carl forester grasses came in pretty big in the second season
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    previously w/ scale model
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    Winter shot of the red twig, which seems to be its most interesting time
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  17. #242
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    Fukn bugs... I opened one of my potato boxes to pull some new potatoes for dinner tonight and there's a big time ant nest in there. There's thousands of the bastards and they're running around with egg sacks. What do I do right now to deal with it or is it not as big a deal as I'm thinking? There are organic ant control products but nothing available until midweek. Vinegar? It would be a really tough spot to get boiling water into.

  18. #243
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phall View Post
    Lookin for some insight, first off, have had 2 tomato and 2 pepper plants that we transplanted into the ground topped by something. Just a bare stem sticking out of the ground. Others nearby are fine, any ideas what that could be and what we could do to prevent the others from meeting the same demise?

    2nd, on our beans, squash, and other leafy plants out back, we've been getting holes in the leaves, nothing really along the edges, just right in the middle. Think a cayanne/dr. bronners mint/water solution would curb that?

    This is only our third year gardening, had a VERY dismal harvest last year but looking forward to this year, we've planted a lot more.
    Rabbits. Monty Python was right.

    To keep them at bay use cayenne pepper.
    Or a pellet gun
    ďLife has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.Ē
    Hunter S. Thompson

  19. #244
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    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    our garden doesn’t produce food...hopefully that’s ok in the thread

    carl forester grasses came in pretty big in the second season
    Click image for larger version. 

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    previously w/ scale model
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Winter shot of the red twig, which seems to be its most interesting time
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Wow, this looks like a spectacular setting.

  20. #245
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    Quote Originally Posted by The AD View Post
    Wow, this looks like a spectacular setting.
    Itís def in green mode right now
    (& weíre 3 sides to a forested park...no neighbors)

  21. #246
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    Aaahhh ants....

    Vinegar and lemon juice? It's supposed to work on termites, will it work on ants also?

    edit: Apparently a 70% vinegar solution slows 'em down for a few hours. I opened it up after dousing the area around the colony and the ones that are moving are really sluggish. It's hard to tell what's going on further in without making a mess so I'll check it again in the morning and see what's up. I'm hoping to see a pile of dead ants.
    Last edited by gravitylover; 05-31-2020 at 01:33 PM.

  22. #247
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    Well I'm impressed. I opened it this morning and there were no crawlies moving around at all. Fingers crossed xxx

  23. #248
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    Jan 2016
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    This year having time on my hands I was considering building some raised beds to compliment the other garden area. With a few other projects ongoing I was hesitant to spend the money on lumber so I used a pile of existing logs I had from the last few trees I've lost and went a bit rustic.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Carrots, onions, celery (never grew any of these so don't know what to expect) plus beans, peas, peppers, tomatoes and greens. Strawberries for fun but I never have much luck with them.

    The marked off squares is some rookie-looking stuff, right?!

    Dirt!
    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is the main garden, conveniently located underneath a willow tree.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Raspberries in the back do pretty good each year, tomatoes and peppers are in the front. (pics is a coupe weeks old)

    Ended up spending some money on wood for a herb garden.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Ignore the clutter.

    Question - besides 'helper-marigolds' is there anything I could put between tomatoes to use some of that space?

  24. #249
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    ^^ Borage and Marjoram. FYI I've learned that logs standing on end rot much more quickly so have a plan, rocks or something, to fill the spaces as one has to come out.

  25. #250
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    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover View Post
    ^^ Borage and Marjoram. FYI I've learned that logs standing on end rot much more quickly so have a plan, rocks or something, to fill the spaces as one has to come out.
    Hey, I appreciate that. Re the rot - yeah this is already in a low spot of the yard and pretty moist as is. Luckily (?) I have no shortage of similarly sized wood. I build fires for sport.

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