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  1. #1
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    Whistler bike rental

    Looking like we will be heading to Whistler in July but it looks like i will probably be flying so won't be bringing my bike. Where is a good place to rent some decent quality bikes? I was looking at one that had some nice Santa Cruz bikes but they wanted $150 a day which is just stupid IMO... does anyone have any good recommendations? I wouldn't mind trying a couple of different bikes, mainly trail/enduro whatever the cool term is now days for a step below downhill.

  2. #2
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    If you're driving in from Vancouver rent from Essential Cycles (Giant) or Endless Biking (Rocky). it's quite the cost-savings and both are on the way in from the airport in North Van for bike pickup.

    https://www.essentialcycles.com/rental-fleet - just clicked around and its 100/day

  3. #3
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    Nov 2015
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    Driggs
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    Yeah, what Lee said.

    Two years ago we did the same sort of thing, but ended up renting from Corsa in Squamish. Didn't have the most awesome customer service (super bro-bra, and really talked down to the lady friend, which is sorta to be expected from a "destination" shop), but they have a bunch of good bikes for like $75 a day. They do specifically say not to ride their rentals at the Whistler Bike Park, which makes a ton of sense, we were fine since we just rode Squamish and one lap on the valley trails.

    In the future I'm just going to fly with my bike though, I feel like we missed out on a fair bit of potential riding just because we were limited by the rental schedule.

  4. #4
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    If we fly we will for sure be renting a car in van so that’s a good idea. I’ve never biked Whistler so excuse my ignorance and stupidity but is the entire lift accessed bike runs consider the whistler bike park? Or is there a bike park within the trail system??

    looking at all the extra costs i really want to just drive but with a 9 month old I’m hesitant of the 11 hour drive from Calgary

  5. #5
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    Nov 2015
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    Driggs
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    Yeah, so the Whistler Bike Park is all the lift-accessed stuff. Buy a lift ticket and go ride A-Line or whatever. It's awesome, will blow your mind, but when you have the quality of riders and mountains that Whistler does, trails get built outside the lift-accessed park. There are trails all through the valley, everything from "take your 2 year old on their strider" to "pros call this too gnarly." And it's all human-powered, pedal to the top. So when we went most recently, we actually didn't even buy lift tickets, we just rode pedal stuff. The bike park is totally worth your time, but you can also have an insane bike vacation without ever setting foot in it.

    Personally, even with a kiddo, I'd go for the drive. You're going to spend 11 hours getting from home to Whistler anyway. You're gonna deal with a crying kid in the airport, at the rental car place, and then you'll still have the like 1.5-2 hour drive from the airport to Whistler.

    My parents did a bunch of 16 hour drives when my siblings and I were young, my dad would nap in the afternoon, and then we'd leave around dinner, sleep in the car, and wake up at our destination. And if the kid is pitching a fit or whatever, you're dealing with it in the privacy of your car, not on a plane full of people.

    I'm driving this spring, even though it's 17 hours. Still gonna be worth it to have the flexibility of a car and my own bike.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for all the info... why I was confused about the bike park thing is that some rentals (bronson and nomad) state they are not allowed to be used at the whistler bike park, does that seem a bit excessive? I ride a Bronson now so that’s what I’ll be bringing if we drive... this rental place only allowed there v10s in the park.

  7. #7
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    IMO a Bronson is fine for a day in the park, but wouldn't hold up for a season of punters casing it into landings, hence the rental policy. The park can eat bike parts, ride smooth.

  8. #8
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    Driggs
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    I'll second that. You're totally fine with your Bronson. I'd never rent, or lend a non-DH bike to anyone riding there though. Braking bumps day after day really take the mileage out of all your components. Totally fine for a week's vacation, totally unacceptable for a full summer.

  9. #9
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    Ok, that all makes sense to me now...I’m for sure going to try a couple of new bikes just for fun. I broke my seat and a chain ring at whitefish last summer so I get it... renting out 8k bikes to people is probably an expensive business

  10. #10
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    Apr 2006
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    I went last August after Crankworx and brought my enduro 29. Flying Delta, it was free to bring but you gotta locate a bike bag and had to keep it under 50lbs (maybe that has changed since last summer?). Decided to bring my own bike as I didn't want to spend a shit ton of $ on rentals. Did three days of park riding and even with 160mm travel, the bike (and myself) took a beating. If you're gonna bang laps in the park, maybe look at renting a full-blown DH rig. Otherwise, bring your own bike, do a day in the park and then go ride Squammish or other trails.

  11. #11
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    Sep 2013
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    When I was there last July I rented from these two shops in the Village. Flew in and rental car didn't have space for bikes, so I just paid a little more for the convenience of being able to pick up and drop off right there, and booked ahead of time. FYI, neither of these places cost $150/day, and if you book far enough in advance it's a bit cheaper I recall, I paid around $80-110/day, I think, depending on bike. Some of the bikes they don't allow in the bike park, it will say on their website. Good vibes from both shops, bikes were in decent shape at both places, didn't have any issues... I wear clips and brought my own pedals, they swapped out for me there.

    Like everyone has said, the bike park will do a number to you and the bike. I didn't want to deal with traveling with my bike and the potential for shit to break, a frame or something else (has happened to friends who recommended I just rent). If I was going for longer and exploring more outside the bike park then maybe I'd bring my own whip... but I just beat the shit out of a rental and it was definitley worth the money for me.

    You can also save some bucks buying your lift ticket in advance and in multi-days, etc.

    https://www.arbutusroutes.com/produc...e-hire/enduro/

    https://whistlersports.com/

  12. #12
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    Jan 2008
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    Not trying to discourage you in any way, but bring some quality locks and use them when ever you're not beside your bikes, personal or rental.
    Its a huge destination for bikes and the crack heads that live 1 hour away in Vancouver think of it as free drug money to steal bikes. The local authorities are doing a lot to help reduce it, like bait bikes with GPS, but it's still rampant
    Lock em up even on the car rack, in your condo, or on your balcony, or condo storage unit. Its not unheard of for condo lockers/storage units to be cut open with sawzalls and have bikes stollen.

  13. #13
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    Some wicked advice here! Thanks all.

    we have decided to drive so I will be bringing my bike... but will most likely rent an sb165 from Arbutus Routes for a day to try that... maybe even two and like was suggested here maybe save my bronson for some less bike park laps.

    I’ll for sure bring good security! Living in a city with lots of meth and crack heads I’m familiar with fortifying my stuff, unfortunately.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandbox View Post
    Some wicked advice here! Thanks all.
    We have decided to drive so I will be bringing my bike.
    Make sure you have new brake pads and a brakes bleed before you come on your trip. Burning though your last 25% and needing emergency pads and a service in Whistler can put a damper on your trip. Our shop would see a ton of visitors that needed a "bleed and pads right away" because they "didn't realize how much braking they'd do"
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  15. #15
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    That’s a good reminder! I’ll bring some extra pads for sure. In all honesty looking at my days I may only get 2 lift accessed days in... that Yeti 165 is damn tempting for those days but I know the wife will make a stink if I rent a bike all the time after I bring mine, haha. Maybe squeeze a Squamish day in with my bike to save that....

  16. #16
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    5 pack of pads from chain reaction ftw. Pads stashed everywhere when its lifts or shuttles

    Sent from my SM-G950W using TGR Forums mobile app

  17. #17
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    Mar 2007
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    Eugenio Oregón
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    Whistler bike rental

    What Gen Bronson, what kind of fork, and how big are your rotors?

    I did 2 days there during a big dry spell (when all of BC was socked in smoke during the 2017 fires) on my Gen 1 Bronson, that admittedly is kitted out to be light and nimble (lots of plastic, er, carbon, inline air shock) more than a basher. I don’t weigh much so it’s never been a problem on any extended trail descents, but yeah even doing blue runs at Whistler, the braking bumps just wore me out as fast as my brake pads got eaten up. I have an A1 Pike up front, and hadn’t gotten around to swapping out my 150 air spring for the 160 I had in my parts bin - doubt it would have made much difference though because the RCT3 damper just couldn’t keep up with so many thousand vertical feet of braking bumps and rubble. Even the moist smoother trails have a little bit of rubble that you might not notice on the first lap, but you sure as hell will on the 5th, 6th, 7th, etc.

    I’m never riding inbounds there again with anything less than a wide-stanchion low-stiction 170mm upfront and a coil in the back.
    _______________________________________________
    "Strapping myself to a sitski built with 30lb of metal and fibreglass then trying to water ski in it sounds like a stupid idea to me.

    I'll be there."
    ... Andy Campbell

  18. #18
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    You wouldnt go heli skiing and bring your skinny skis. Bring the fats and make it count

    Sent from my SM-G950W using TGR Forums mobile app

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by grinch View Post
    You wouldnt go heli skiing and bring your skinny skis. Bring the fats and make it count

    Sent from my SM-G950W using TGR Forums mobile app
    Pretty much this.

    Even an sb165 is a bit smaller than what I'd really want for the bike park. Dh bikes exist for a reason.

  20. #20
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    Good thoughts by all... it is a gen 1 Bronson, pike up front, dpx2 rear.... no point in thrashing it if I don’t have to. I’ll look to rent for the lifts and ride what i brought elsewhere. Thanks again!

  21. #21
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    Eugenio Oregón
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    Yeah if you only had 3 hours to ride lifts for one day that would work ... otherwise just rent a DH bike and save your wrist, finger muscles lol.
    _______________________________________________
    "Strapping myself to a sitski built with 30lb of metal and fibreglass then trying to water ski in it sounds like a stupid idea to me.

    I'll be there."
    ... Andy Campbell

  22. #22
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    If you are only riding a couple days in Whistler I would do one day in the park and do it right with a V10 from Evolution Sports. Not cheap (and get the insurance in case your break a wheel) but those are the best maintained rental DH bikes in town and fully pimped spec. You'll be more comfortable and safer (use that argument with the wife) on a big rig, obviously bring a full face or rent one if you don't own one. One factor to consider is the physical beating you will take on a trail bike in the park if your body is not used to park riding, and recovering from that beating will reduce enjoyment of subsequent riding days or force a rest day.

    The other Whistler day(s) ride valley trails on your Bronson. There's a lifetime of pedal access, but assuming mid July or later, I'd recommend checking out Blackcomb one day: Dark Crystal, maybe back up to Microclimate/Hey Bud etc. if you have the legs for two laps. If the Sproatt alpine stuff is open (Lord of the Squirrels) that is an awesome experience, but it's usually end of July depending on snowpack. Another alpine option is if Top of the World is open, bring your Bronson up, ride TOTW and branch out to Khyber Pass/Middle of Nowhere/Kashmir/Line of Control etc. 5,200 vert of singletrack tech to Creekside (bring spares as it's a long ride if you have a mechnical). Tons of other great pedal loops on the westside as well, see Trailforks.

    We're in Vancouver and did a road trip to Cranbrook last summer to visit family with our 11 month old. It was honestly way less stressful than flying because of the reasons cydwhit listed. We broke it up in 3-4hr segments, stopping in Penticton and Nelson for a couple days each to visit friends and ride bikes, was an awesome vacation and will probably repeat it this summer. I hate the feeling of being trapped on a plane with a kid that could blow up at any minute, even flying 90min to Calgary to visit family stresses me out.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by gramboh View Post
    If you are only riding a couple days in Whistler I would do one day in the park and do it right with a V10 from Evolution Sports. Not cheap (and get the insurance in case your break a wheel) but those are the best maintained rental DH bikes in town and fully pimped spec. You'll be more comfortable and safer (use that argument with the wife) on a big rig, obviously bring a full face or rent one if you don't own one. One factor to consider is the physical beating you will take on a trail bike in the park if your body is not used to park riding, and recovering from that beating will reduce enjoyment of subsequent riding days or force a rest day.

    The other Whistler day(s) ride valley trails on your Bronson. There's a lifetime of pedal access, but assuming mid July or later, I'd recommend checking out Blackcomb one day: Dark Crystal, maybe back up to Microclimate/Hey Bud etc. if you have the legs for two laps. If the Sproatt alpine stuff is open (Lord of the Squirrels) that is an awesome experience, but it's usually end of July depending on snowpack. Another alpine option is if Top of the World is open, bring your Bronson up, ride TOTW and branch out to Khyber Pass/Middle of Nowhere/Kashmir/Line of Control etc. 5,200 vert of singletrack tech to Creekside (bring spares as it's a long ride if you have a mechnical). Tons of other great pedal loops on the westside as well, see Trailforks.

    We're in Vancouver and did a road trip to Cranbrook last summer to visit family with our 11 month old. It was honestly way less stressful than flying because of the reasons cydwhit listed. We broke it up in 3-4hr segments, stopping in Penticton and Nelson for a couple days each to visit friends and ride bikes, was an awesome vacation and will probably repeat it this summer. I hate the feeling of being trapped on a plane with a kid that could blow up at any minute, even flying 90min to Calgary to visit family stresses me out.
    awesome advice... i will forsure get the insurance on whatever bike i rent, i ain't paying for a 10k V10 i break, haha.

    So if i understand you i can take a bike on the top of the world and do trails off of that? do you pay for a lift ticket up i'm assuming? And those are less DH trails and more Enduro?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandbox View Post
    awesome advice... i will forsure get the insurance on whatever bike i rent, i ain't paying for a 10k V10 i break, haha.

    So if i understand you i can take a bike on the top of the world and do trails off of that? do you pay for a lift ticket up i'm assuming? And those are less DH trails and more Enduro?
    Yeah - there are a bunch of trails off of top of the world that aren't in the bike park. Most of them involve a bit of pedaling, so a non-DH bike is preferable, although the trails are generally similar in terms of difficulty / technicalness to the black / double blacks in the bike park. And yeah, those rides are definitely worth doing - there's some really good trail in there. You can pay for a single chairlift ride to the top. It's kind of expensive, but generally worth it. Make of day of it and milk the vert (i.e. descend for a while, pedal back up a bit to hit some other trail, descend some more, etc.).

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    Yeah - there are a bunch of trails off of top of the world that aren't in the bike park. Most of them involve a bit of pedaling, so a non-DH bike is preferable, although the trails are generally similar in terms of difficulty / technicalness to the black / double blacks in the bike park. And yeah, those rides are definitely worth doing - there's some really good trail in there. You can pay for a single chairlift ride to the top. It's kind of expensive, but generally worth it. Make of day of it and milk the vert (i.e. descend for a while, pedal back up a bit to hit some other trail, descend some more, etc.).
    Liking the sounds of that!

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