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  1. #35126
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    Quote Originally Posted by east or bust View Post
    Look at me, actually agreeing with wooley for once. BS is right. With the right drivers behind the wheel and ample forethought there’s no reason we couldn’t develop a high speed rail system, not just in the west, but across the entire country.
    My dad used to tell me I was smarter than I looked.
    A few people feel the rain. Most people just get wet.

  2. #35127
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    Quote Originally Posted by east or bust View Post
    Look at me, actually agreeing with wooley for once. BS is right. With the right drivers behind the wheel and ample forethought thereís no reason we couldnít develop a high speed rail system, not just in the west, but across the entire country.
    Would get bogged down in eminent domain lawsuits. Take our only "high speed" line, the Acela. To make it actually high speed would mean seisure of maybe trillions of dollars worth of private land. Ain't gonna happen.

    The world is perfect. Appreciate the details.

  3. #35128
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    How many of you are actually willing to use public transportation post COVID?

    I donít think a single person here, the relatively affluent, outdoor pursuit loving dentists, is in any shape or form that makes a difference.

  4. #35129
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    Benny, you would have called it Clinton's Ditch.
    A few people feel the rain. Most people just get wet.

  5. #35130
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdironRider View Post
    How many of you are actually willing to use public transportation post COVID?

    I donít think a single person here, the relatively affluent, outdoor pursuit loving dentists, is in any shape or form that makes a difference.
    Raises hand.

    Iíd consider jobs further away if I could take public transit. I lived in NYC for five years and that is my standard. If I could access a train stop less than a mile from my home and get me to a stop less than a mile from my work, I would be all over it. Even if I had to drive a bit to get to said stop by my house. I hate commuting in a car.

    As for recreation, it would be harder. But always though a Friday night train up to Truckee from SF would be great. Especially if you can get a free shuttle once up there to slopeside or shuttle stop lodging.

    Mammoth has a great transit system that works great once you get to town. Never a need to get in your car. Even post COVId.

  6. #35131
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    Donít tram cars count as public transportation?

  7. #35132
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdironRider View Post
    How many of you are actually willing to use public transportation post COVID?

    I donít think a single person here, the relatively affluent, outdoor pursuit loving dentists, is in any shape or form that makes a difference.
    Me. As I have all my adult life.

    Betcha you'll get into a plane, though, right?

    The world is perfect. Appreciate the details.

  8. #35133
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdironRider View Post
    How many of you are actually willing to use public transportation post COVID?

    I don’t think a single person here, the relatively affluent, outdoor pursuit loving dentists, is in any shape or form that makes a difference.
    The dentist traveling I-90 and I-70 in Beemers and Sprinters to ski might like to have the hoi polloi on a train. Or better, to live slope side and commute to work on the train.
    A few people feel the rain. Most people just get wet.

  9. #35134
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    Public transit never worked for the job i had and it doesnt work up here

    I did fly into YVR, took publice trans everywhere and enjoyed it

    much more euro with LRT to the airport
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  10. #35135
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdironRider View Post
    How many of you are actually willing to use public transportation post COVID?

    I don’t think a single person here, the relatively affluent, outdoor pursuit loving dentists, is in any shape or form that makes a difference.
    I'm not surprised you didn't pay attention to this: https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...mtlodge-sedrun .

    As far as "matter", I'm with iceman on that one. Everything matters as long as we take it in stride.

    I just reject the idea that rural life universally increases greenhouse gases, that there should be no development outside of urban areas.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  11. #35136
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    I had a gig in downtown Chicago long ago. The building was right next to the train station. I was in a nice extended stay about 40 miles west of down town. It was okay. But for the past 14 years I have worked from home. I like this way better. Now with the face to face video I'm forced to bathe and put on decent clothes before I plop down at my workstation.

    Seems like a win for everyone. I wonder if any large company will go back to the way it was
    Own your fail. ~Jer~

  12. #35137
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    Quote Originally Posted by altasnob View Post
    But Europe has much more dense housing than in the US, regardless of whether you compare cities or rural villages. Paris is more dense than NYC. And this is true for old, medieval cities and villages as well as in post-war Germany (so its not just an age thing). Europe also has much stronger urban growth boundaries than in the US (urban growth boundaries apply to both large cities, and small towns). 30 years from now, Teton Valley is not going to look like a dense, medieval French village. It will be a sprawling mess of McMansions on cul-de-sacs dotted with the occasional Costco and Walmart.

    I am a West coast guy, but I understand NE USA is more like Europe, with lots of small, but dense, towns. This is probably the most efficient place in the US to live and it is not surprising it is also the most European-like, and oldest, part of the US. It also has climate similar to Europe compared to the arid West.
    And shitty skiing

    Sent from my Redmi Note 8 Pro using Tapatalk

  13. #35138
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    Passenger car has relatively high passenger miles per gallon. Better than the average bus.
    https://afdc.energy.gov/conserve/mass_transit.html

    Car also rates highly for convenience - it's always departing immediately from close by. (Also a healthier option in the once per century pandemic.)

  14. #35139
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdironRider View Post
    How many of you are actually willing to use public transportation post COVID?

    I donít think a single person here, the relatively affluent, outdoor pursuit loving dentists, is in any shape or form that makes a difference.
    If everyone would get vaxed I would but since it doesn't look like that's gonna happen, No.

  15. #35140
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    Fear and Loathing, a Rat Flu Odyssey

    Quote Originally Posted by gretch6364 View Post
    Can we try to at least salvage one good thing from this pandemic? If so, how about working from home, at least half of the time? As a country, we have talked a lot about global warming and reducing emissions. Not having to heat and keep the lights on in all the office buildings and then reducing how much everyone drives for commuting to work would sure seem to be a boon for the environment...no?

    Instead of our leaders coming out in support of reduced commuting and energy use, they are starting campaigns to encourage workers back to their offices to save the economies of their cities. Surely the left leaning city population and leaders sees the contradiction in this...no?

    https://kdvr.com/news/coronavirus/wo...ually-want-to/

    Biden needs to start a campaign to encourage work from home arrangements as part of his environmental initiatives. It just make too much sense. Also, American's putting the money spent on commuting and work day lunches could be saved or funneled into more durable goods that are better for the environment.

    The skeptic in me thinks it will all go back to how it was before....but this sure seems like a great opportunity for this generation of leaders.
    Most people canít work from home you moron

    Oh, Iím amazed that thereís a Fred Meyer in Juneau. Is there a Walmart in Ketchikan?

    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  16. #35141
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongShortLong View Post
    Passenger car has relatively high passenger miles per gallon. Better than the average bus.
    https://afdc.energy.gov/conserve/mass_transit.html

    Car also rates highly for convenience - it's always departing immediately from close by. (Also a healthier option in the once per century pandemic.)
    yes, that half passenger we always drive with

    cars are only convenient and there if you build everything for cars, which is expensive, wasteful, and not particularly healthy. And if you pretend traffic doesn’t exist.

  17. #35142
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    One of the things about cars that the average person probably never considers is how much real estate they consume. In the US the area for parking cars exceeds the housing area per person.

    When I was working in development, the city traffic woman told me that there are an average of 7.5 car trips per day per household. I joked that who hasn't left their car at the bar after last call, but she wasn't amused.

    So cars could be more efficient than the bus, but the majority are unnecessary single person trips to multiple spots of pavement that serve no other purpose.

  18. #35143
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    Cars are only more efficient than the bus in the US because so many buses are empty. Because they don't come often enough. Because it's hard to justify a bus every 10 minutes when nobody rides the bus. The trick is getting enough people to ride the bus to justify increasing service which will get more people to ride the bus etc. I don't think it will ever happen.
    In Europe, DC and NYC we've always used public transportation and wish it was more practical here.
    Flying to Europe from SFO we take train to east bay, Bart to the airport (I think it requires a transfer, don't remember). Time is comparable to driving and a lot less nerve wracking. And cheaper than parking near the airport.

  19. #35144
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    I see hydraulic turtles.

  20. #35145
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    OMG! There is life after covid!

    Some fully vaxxed friends stopped by this evening and we had the most wonderful time visiting sans masks like there had never been a pandemic. Sigh.
    ďWhen you see something that is not right, not just, not fair, you have a moral obligation to say something. To do something." Rep. John Lewis


    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkiní Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  21. #35146
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    Quote Originally Posted by huckbucket View Post
    I get it, but I wouldn't have posted it if there wasn't some merit to the piece. The author did a really nice job. Closest to a smoking gun that I've seen.
    Got around to reading that. That author is vulnerable to "attacking the source," though I agree the argument is well laid out. Gotta go rewatch the recent furin TWiV now. Also I see the MSM has picked up the story, WSJ in particular.

    True or not, it's primed for an endless dumpster fire of conspiracy theories. Last few paragraphs particularly dumped speculative gasoline on said fire.

  22. #35147
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongShortLong View Post
    Got around to reading that. That author is vulnerable to "attacking the source," though I agree the argument is well laid out.
    But be sure to see mofro's take on it as well.

  23. #35148
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongShortLong View Post
    Got around to reading that. That author is vulnerable to "attacking the source," though I agree the argument is well laid out. Gotta go rewatch the recent furin TWiV now. Also I see the MSM has picked up the story, WSJ in particular.

    True or not, it's primed for an endless dumpster fire of conspiracy theories. Last few paragraphs particularly dumped speculative gasoline on said fire.
    Given that a tiny, tiny fraction of the people who will read that article are actually capable of understanding it and evaluating it, the only way most of us can judge it is by considering the credentials and agenda of the author.

  24. #35149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mofro261 View Post
    As a mad scientist who has waffled between making vaccines to improve humanity and dreaming up the Sar-bola like viruses to wipe out humanity, I'm a little jealous if someone else beat me to it on the latter one. But if Sars2 was lab derived, why use a poor furin cleavage site like RRAR with only one previous occurance in the database, over other more well established sites for furin? Codon optimized but not amino acid optimized seems like poor planning if it was by plan.
    This seems like a very apt criticism of an intentionally-designed Sar-bola, but not really a rejection of the hypothesis that a bunch of "possible" mutations might have been synthesized and one of them got past the level 2 PPE. After all, if you're trying to predict, why not all of the above? They could have just gotten unlucky on the one example and not the others, right?

  25. #35150
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    Question for lab guys like Mofro et al. Let's say I got my lair finished (laser tables have been backed up, but I have contacts in shipping). And I'm leaning toward a bio threat instead of a dirty bomb (lasts too long) or hiring a bunch of hackers (rising labor costs). If I hired you to make a pandemic virus that no one would suspect, would you recommend optimizing the furry cleavage site for humans or would something like the SARS2 be good enough and not raise suspicion?

    Asking for a friend.

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