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  1. #35726
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mofro261 View Post
    We covered this before but there are NO microchips in any of the vaccines, they are way too big to pass thru the needle.

    We have to use nanochips instead, but it takes somewhere between 100 and 1,000 of them to get similar 5G as the microchip implants.

    besides its ^^ unnecessary becuz bill gates already sold you one for 1000$

    and you are addicted to it
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  2. #35727
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mofro261 View Post
    We covered this before but there are NO microchips in any of the vaccines, they are way too big to pass thru the needle.

    We have to use nanochips instead, but it takes somewhere between 100 and 1,000 of them to get similar 5G as the microchip implants.
    Can you explain how they are coordinated after injection? Is that why they have to be magnetic?
    A woman came up to me and said "I'd like to poison your mind
    with wrong ideas that appeal to you, though I am not unkind."

  3. #35728
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    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/jun-...ines-1.6061099

    how they^^ delivered the vax eh


    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/mar-...ible-1.5955279

    how they ^^made it SO fast, maybe if the mouth breathers had read this they would get the vax ?
    or more likley they would just say its a conspiracy

    its all in Canadian so hope its understandable
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  4. #35729
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    Dr Fauci isn’t concerned about vaccinated people and the Delta variant. Good luck to all the non vax crowd, you’re kind of an an island now


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  5. #35730
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mofro261 View Post
    We covered this before but there are NO microchips in any of the vaccines, they are way too big to pass thru the needle.

    We have to use nanochips instead, but it takes somewhere between 100 and 1,000 of them to get similar 5G as the microchip implants.
    Oh yeah?!? Well how many yoctochips would it take mr. smarty pants????

  6. #35731
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    Funny how Fuacci is still revered by the tards. Even the BBC was kind enough to report that about half of the deaths from the new Delta variant were VAXED.

    Even if you do not read the words...Watch the Clip

    https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/w...inated-people/
    I'm cool with this, as long as you Kirkwood Bro Brah's stay away from Heavenly when 88 closes- TahoeBc

  7. #35732
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobz View Post
    I went into a gas station mini-mart yesterday and most of the other customers inside weren't masked. That's pretty much a first as far as I can tell. Haven't seen mostly unmasked customers in a store since, oh, back when Covid was spreading like crazy and I was gassing up in Redding on the way to Shasta.


    Jon Stewart's bit there was kind of interesting and unexpected, if a bit lacking in context. Whatever you think about the likelihood of the lab leak scenario, it does beg the question, is it possible that scientists would ever create and experiment with something that has the potential to unintentionally kill a lot of people, just for the pursuit of knowledge prestige and grant money; if you're being honest the answer is yes.
    I don't know nearly enough about virology research and immunology to be able to describe how gain of function research might contribute to the ability to prevent and treat viral infections. I do know that since I studied virology and immunology in med school in the 70's, the increase in the understanding of both is astounding, and that of course is due to research. The mRNA vaccines would not have been possible then, and any vaccine would have taken much longer. Whether gain of function research in particular has any value I will leave to the experts to decide except to say that when basic research is done no one knows at the time what future application the knowledge gained might have. The scientists who discovered the basic structure of the atom weren't thinking about bombs. (Perhaps we would have been better off without that research.)

    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post
    It was the drive up teller not ATM and the dude sent the carrier back three times during the 20min transaction. I'd say that is excessive esp. when the lobby is open for business.
    I didn't mean to imply that you were wrong to be annoyed--of course you weren't. Anyway, we don't have a drive through live teller in Truckee either. To use an ATM or to use a teller requires being potentially exposed to unmasked people, and almost always involves being annoyed. I avoid the bank. The closest thing I can think of is waiting in a long line at the PO while the only 2 clerks and the manager deal with one customer's seemingly unprecedented problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by NakedShorts View Post
    Funny how Fuacci is still revered by the tards. Even the BBC was kind enough to report that about half of the deaths from the new Delta variant were VAXED.

    Even if you do not read the words...Watch the Clip

    https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/w...inated-people/
    https://www.bbc.com/news/health-57441677
    The bbc post doesn't say whether the vaccinated delta variant cases were in people who had one shot or two. Since one shot of a two vaccine is known to be poorly effective against delta, it would not be surprising to see a lot of cases and deaths in partly vaccinated cases. Remember that GB's policy was to give as many people as possible one shot before giving the second. While the percent of fully vaccinated people in GB is similar to the US, there are a lot more partly vaccinated people there at risk for delta, which is much more common there, so far.

  8. #35733
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    "Overall, we rate Armstrong Economics Right Biased through story selection and affiliation. We also rate them Mixed for factual reporting due to the occasional promotion of conspiracy theories...."

    Nah. And Duckduck finds nothing to support.

  9. #35734
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    PBS just rebroadcast an American Experience about the effort to fight polio. A lot of parallels to Covid. It was a relatively uncommon disease and serious cases--paralysis and death-- were very uncommon. Serious cases of polio were about a tenth of Covid deaths as a percentage of the population. The fear was, if anything, greater, because so many victims were children and because of the fear campaign the March of Dimes used to crowdfund research. (The March of Dimes seems to have invented crowdfunding and was the main supporter of Salk's research. The federal govt doesn't seem to have funded the polio research.)

    Salk's vaccine was heavily criticized as being developed too quickly. It was adopted mainly at the urging of the head of the March of Dimes--FDR's old law partner. The Sabin vaccine--the favorite of the scientific establishment--was released 7 years after the Salk. I got both, and nonparalytic polio at age 2.

    Polio was endemic for millenia. People were exposed as young children, when the disease is rarely serious, and developed immunity. Mothers passed immunity to their children; that immunity lasted 6 months. If a child was exposed in the first 6 months their immunity was reinforced, if a little later they had minimal, transient symptoms. As water became cleaner fewer and fewer people were protected with mothers' antibodies or were exposed at a safe age, leading to epidemics in the first half of the 20th century. As time went on there were more and more older people with no immunity and the age of serious cases started to rise.

    People have argued that modern hygiene and vaccines leave people vulnerable to diseases that didn't used to be problems. But under "natural" conditions polio was endemic. With modern hygiene and vaccination it is eradicated in most of the world.

  10. #35735
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    I don't know nearly enough about virology research and immunology to be able to describe how gain of function research might contribute to the ability to prevent and treat viral infections. I do know that since I studied virology and immunology in med school in the 70's, the increase in the understanding of both is astounding, and that of course is due to research. The mRNA vaccines would not have been possible then, and any vaccine would have taken much longer. Whether gain of function research in particular has any value I will leave to the experts to decide except to say that when basic research is done no one knows at the time what future application the knowledge gained might have. The scientists who discovered the basic structure of the atom weren't thinking about bombs. (Perhaps we would have been better off without that research.)
    There's a big gulf between "is some risky research worth it" and "is all of it worth it". If you want to talk about the nuclear program, consider the cumulative damage done to humanity by atmospheric nuclear tests. Granted, Trinity was rather informative, but after a hundred or so, was it really about advancing knowledge or keeping institutions funded?

  11. #35736
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobz View Post
    There's a big gulf between "is some risky research worth it" and "is all of it worth it". If you want to talk about the nuclear program, consider the cumulative damage done to humanity by atmospheric nuclear tests. Granted, Trinity was rather informative, but after a hundred or so, was it really about advancing knowledge or keeping institutions funded?
    Atmospheric tests (or underground tests) of nuclear weapons has nothing whatsoever to do with basic science.
    The problem with risky basic research or any other basic research is that at the time it is conducted no one, including the scientists conducting it, know what potential value it has or how big the risks are. In fact, that's pretty much the definition of basic research. The problem with the gof debate is that it is completely politicized and being conducted by people who have no knowledge of the subject, like you and me. The marriage of science and politics is never a happy one yet divorce is rarely an option. (OK, the Catholic Church did finally accept heliocentricity--it only took 200 years after Galileo.)

  12. #35737
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    Quote Originally Posted by NakedShorts View Post
    Funny how Fuacci is still revered by the tards. Even the BBC was kind enough to report that about half of the deaths from the new Delta variant were VAXED.

    Even if you do not read the words...Watch the Clip

    https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/w...inated-people/
    You're slipping; try harder.

  13. #35738
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    https://www.bbc.com/news/health-57441677
    The bbc post doesn't say whether the vaccinated delta variant cases were in people who had one shot or two. Since one shot of a two vaccine is known to be poorly effective against delta, it would not be surprising to see a lot of cases and deaths in partly vaccinated cases. Remember that GB's policy was to give as many people as possible one shot before giving the second. While the percent of fully vaccinated people in GB is similar to the US, there are a lot more partly vaccinated people there at risk for delta, which is much more common there, so far.
    He must have forgotten to add this part of the article. It's an easy mistake, really.

    "Out of 33,000 cases analysed by PHE and confirmed to be the Delta variant since February, 223 have been admitted to hospital - most were unvaccinated or had only had only dose, and 20 people were fully vaccinated.

    And of 42 deaths in people with Delta variant infections, 23 were unvaccinated and seven had received only one dose. The other 12 had received two doses more than two weeks before."

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bbc...h-57441677.amp

  14. #35739
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    I didn't read far enough either. I just guessed right.

    Also, only 1/3 of UK residents of all ages have not received at least one dose. So the pool of unvaccinated is much smaller, meaning that looking at raw numbers of vaccinated and unvaccinated people getting delta overemphasizes the risk to the vaccinated. Still, the risk to the fully vaccinated isn't trivial and until there is a delta booster the best way to protect people is for the holdouts to get vaccinated to stop the spread.

  15. #35740
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    Quote Originally Posted by PB View Post
    You're slipping; try harder.
    He's trying as hard as he can. Funneh how the science deniers who revere Drumpf like to call other people 'tards.

    "Buhhht buht but I done my own ree-sarch on duh Internetz."

  16. #35741
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    Question:
    My County at 45-ish% fully vaxed. Barely anybody wearing masks indoors, like at the grocery. I’m vaxed (moderna). One of my unvaxed kids “may” be high risk. He gets bad croup whenever he’s sick. The pedetrician is not willing to say one way or the other whether he’s high risk. What’s the potential that I get infected doing my thing around town like running errands (w/ or w/o a mask), bring it home, and infect him?

  17. #35742
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulster2626 View Post
    Never ate a "Hungry Man" dinner in my life.
    Mmmm
    Hungry man

    One step beyond mrs Swanson
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.”
    Hunter S. Thompson

  18. #35743
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    Quote Originally Posted by NakedShorts View Post
    Funny how Fuacci is still revered by the tards. Even the BBC was kind enough to report that about half of the deaths from the new Delta variant were VAXED.

    Even if you do not read the words...Watch the Clip

    https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/w...inated-people/
    You'd better not get it, then. Better safe than sorry.

  19. #35744
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    Quote Originally Posted by NakedShorts View Post
    Funny how Fuacci is still revered by the tards. Even the BBC was kind enough to report that about half of the deaths from the new Delta variant were VAXED.

    Even if you do not read the words...Watch the Clip

    https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/w...inated-people/
    Math: that mystery of the world that you’ll never understand.

    Trumptarded!!


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    Keystone is fucking lame. But, deadly.

  20. #35745
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    I was just on a two week road trip, starting in UT where most people in stores were wearing masks when I left. Went to Oregon + Washington, where it was required in most stores throughout Oregon and the small part of WA I went to. Went to Idaho, it's like the pandemic doesn't exist even in little hippie coffee shops in Hailey, with no required mask signs. Almost zero masks anywhere. Now back in Utah and noticing almost everyone is without masks, a change from 2 weeks ago.

    It's a bit surreal, crossing state lines these days. (Or even just going to PDX, I enjoyed seeing little league baseball games going on next to homeless camps. Watch out for fly balls and needles boys!)

  21. #35746
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobz View Post
    There's a big gulf between "is some risky research worth it" and "is all of it worth it". If you want to talk about the nuclear program, consider the cumulative damage done to humanity by atmospheric nuclear tests. Granted, Trinity was rather informative, but after a hundred or so, was it really about advancing knowledge or keeping institutions funded?
    Over 500 atmospheric tests were conducted.

    PTBT went into effect in '63 banning atmospheric testing.

    Most of the atmospheric tests were not huge science gains after (and before) IVY-MIKE in 1952 that couldn't have been discovered with unground testing, although the catastrophe of CASTLE BRAVO might have been even worse if it was done at NTS underground and vented to atmosphere (imagine EMERY BANEBERRY except with 150x the yield causing uncontained venting instead of so unexpected fracturing in Baneberry). There were some later HAAT that were scientifically very important so you could say DOMINIC-I was a useful (but fraught) series but HAAT was not a radiological hazard anything like a surface burst. But by PLUMBOB in 57 the US had figured out how to do underground testing in a (relatively) contained manner.

    Most atmospheric tests could have been skipped scientifically (including the science of nuclear warfare).

    A lot of the tests were military-political actions that were as much about showing the other nations what your nation could do. Some of that was necessary for deterrence, but again, most atmospheric tests had little benefit scientifically or politically.

    I'm certainly glad atmospheric testing was banned. I do worry a little about whether testing alternatives to underground will demonstrate nuclear surety sufficiently to sustain deterrence over the long term... you don't want one country's political-military leaders being advise "the other guys nukes likely won't even go off!"
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  22. #35747
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    Over 500 atmospheric tests were conducted.

    PTBT went into effect in '63 banning atmospheric testing.

    Most of the atmospheric tests were not huge science gains after (and before) IVY-MIKE in 1952 that couldn't have been discovered with unground testing, although the catastrophe of CASTLE BRAVO might have been even worse if it was done at NTS underground and vented to atmosphere (imagine EMERY BANEBERRY except with 150x the yield causing uncontained venting instead of so unexpected fracturing in Baneberry). There were some later HAAT that were scientifically very important so you could say DOMINIC-I was a useful (but fraught) series but HAAT was not a radiological hazard anything like a surface burst. But by PLUMBOB in 57 the US had figured out how to do underground testing in a (relatively) contained manner.

    Most atmospheric tests could have been skipped scientifically (including the science of nuclear warfare).

    A lot of the tests were military-political actions that were as much about showing the other nations what your nation could do. Some of that was necessary for deterrence, but again, most atmospheric tests had little benefit scientifically or politically.

    I'm certainly glad atmospheric testing was banned. I do worry a little about whether testing alternatives to underground will demonstrate nuclear surety sufficiently to sustain deterrence over the long term... you don't want one country's political-military leaders being advise "the other guys nukes likely won't even go off!"
    Let's just all assume that everyone's nukes will work and behave accordingly.

  23. #35748
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    Got my JNJ
    I'm cool with this, as long as you Kirkwood Bro Brah's stay away from Heavenly when 88 closes- TahoeBc

  24. #35749
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    Let's just all assume that everyone's nukes will work and behave accordingly.
    Except that's not always quite how that works, exactly, sadly... there's a reason we spend so much on LLNL NIF and everyone fires off a few missiles.
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  25. #35750
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    COVID May Cause Long-Term Brain Loss, Study Says

    And if you suffered brain loss previously, there’s more of a chance that you probably didn’t get vaxxed. j/k

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