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  1. #9751
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    You'll change your mind when you see a 2500 dollar price tag on a washing machine.
    Is that because 'merica has "printed" so much USD fiat currency, that hyper-inflation has reared its ugly head? Or Trump has jacked up the import tariffs on China?
    "We don't beat the reaper by living longer, we beat the reaper by living well and living fully." - Randy Pausch

  2. #9752
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toadman View Post
    Is that because 'merica has "printed" so much USD fiat currency, that hyper-inflation has reared its ugly head? Or Trump has jacked up the import tariffs on China?
    Mainly because we're not awesome at manufacturing shit any more.


  3. #9753
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    What else could go wrong?


    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/w...-a9438446.html


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  4. #9754
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    Quote Originally Posted by huckbucket View Post
    To all of you wondering about sticking CV19 up your ass to gain immunity, here's your list of vaccines in preclinical or Ph1 trials. Note that none involve live CV19 let alone sticking it up your ass.

    https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.105...ed_coronavirus

    Attachment 323026
    I think I missed the 'butt chugging COVID' talk here, what a shame.

  5. #9755
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    Some promising data in Washington State. Both confirmed cases and deaths have been decreasing over the last few days.

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    Data from https://www.doh.wa.gov/Emergencies/Coronavirus

  6. #9756
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    Chinese Rat Flu

    Here's what I don't get. They're telling us that the Covid is big droplets that fall out of the air, land on surfaces, we touch the surfaces and get the virus, which can last on some surfaces for several days. We don't need masks because it's not aerosolized so we're not directly breathing it in.
    This is where it would make sense for everybody to assume they are infected and wear masks so that they wonít infect other people.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  7. #9757
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    Quote Originally Posted by plugboots View Post
    This is where it would make sense for everybody to assume they are infected and wear masks so that they won’t infect other people.
    My wife and I went out for a walk around town on Sunday and we were the only people I saw wearing masks. Yeah, I get that people want to get some fresh air, but why risk it?

  8. #9758
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    Quote Originally Posted by muted View Post
    I think I missed the 'butt chugging COVID' talk here, what a shame.
    Iím pretty disappointed.....

    Read this morning that Germany will be proceeding with antibody testing. If the testing is successful, peeps will get certified and get back to work.... I hope it works.

    #themound.

  9. #9759
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    There appears to be sufficient evidence to conclude the curve in New York City is flattening. The report linked below sets forth the evidence for–and against–this preliminary but potentially important conclusion.

    This does not mean that the epidemic has reached its peak in New York City. That will happen when the incidence of new infections clearly drops. Still, the leveling off of the incidence curve is a key early indicator that something favorable is happening. The question for economists, public health practitioners and policy makers is: what’s making the curve flatten?

    Alternative theories to flattening:
    • Supply Constraints on Testing
    • We Need to Break Down the Data by Borough
    • We’re Missing All the Asymptomatic Cases
    • The Leaky City
    • The Rapid Initial Upswing Is an Artifact of Increased Testing
    • Heterogeneous Mixing or Super-Spreaders


    If the flattening of the curve is real, what's the explanation:
    • Social distancing measures reduce transmission
    • People voluntarily engage in avoidance behaviors once they understand the risk
    • People take action to reduce risk after personally coming in contact with infected individuals



    The takeaway: If social distancing policies had been put in place just one week earlier, we might now be fretting about hundreds rather than thousands of newly reported infections daily. When it comes to our response, yesterday is better than today, which is better than tomorrow.

    https://poseidon01.ssrn.com/delivery...007022&EXT=pdf

  10. #9760
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    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    I have used chiro's in the past but only if something fucks up never for maintenance

    but lately the physio has been fixing stuff the chiro couldn't fix

    and as for maintenance ... yoga
    I have been using them for lile 20 years and ually only go until I feel better. This one doesnt always adjust, most of the time its a stim and massage. I have never felt better. As for yoga, not sure its for me. I dont flex
    Took me like 10 minutes to figure out how to change this shit

  11. #9761
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmg97 View Post
    As for yoga, not sure its for me. I dont flex
    This may have something to do with you not doing yoga.

    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    Mainly because we're not awesome at manufacturing shit any more.
    I have to disagree with this. There are a lot of things we still manufacture and do it better then they can in China. However, it is mostly high precision items that require highly trained individuals. Also, automobiles.

    Labor prices are the primary driver. Average labor wage in China is $3.60. It is $2.60 in Mexico. I am not sure with our current cost of living how we could compete with that...other then making $2,500 washing machines. It is a vicious cycle. If we try and move toward more durable goods and higher quality items, it will cost us more. We either have to lower the cost of living, or change our consumer mentality. Good luck with either of those.
    "We had nice 3 days in your autonomous mountain realm last weekend." - Tom from Austria (the Rax ski guy)

  12. #9762
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    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    We have drive thru at the CVS near here, I'm all about that shit. No need to go in there, thanks.

    They need a drive-thru at the weed store now.
    Quote Originally Posted by MultiVerse View Post
    There appears to be sufficient evidence to conclude the curve in New York City is flattening. The report linked below sets forth the evidence for–and against–this preliminary but potentially important conclusion.

    This does not mean that the epidemic has reached its peak in New York City. That will happen when the incidence of new infections clearly drops. Still, the leveling off of the incidence curve is a key early indicator that something favorable is happening. The question for economists, public health practitioners and policy makers is: what’s making the curve flatten?

    Alternative theories to flattening:
    • Supply Constraints on Testing
    • We Need to Break Down the Data by Borough
    • We’re Missing All the Asymptomatic Cases
    • The Leaky City
    • The Rapid Initial Upswing Is an Artifact of Increased Testing
    • Heterogeneous Mixing or Super-Spreaders


    If the flattening of the curve is real, what's the explanation:
    • Social distancing measures reduce transmission
    • People voluntarily engage in avoidance behaviors once they understand the risk
    • People take action to reduce risk after personally coming in contact with infected individuals



    The takeaway: If social distancing policies had been put in place just one week earlier, we might now be fretting about hundreds rather than thousands of newly reported infections daily. When it comes to our response, yesterday is better than today, which is better than tomorrow.

    https://poseidon01.ssrn.com/delivery...007022&EXT=pdf
    You don't buy my hypothesis that only a fraction of the population is susceptible? Has this ever been observed with any other virus, or is every virus that can infect humans infect all humans (other than those who have acquired antibodies)? I know it's far fetched, but possible?

  13. #9763
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    Quote Originally Posted by gretch6364 View Post
    This may have something to do with you not doing yoga.



    I have to disagree with this. There are a lot of things we still manufacture and do it better then they can in China. However, it is mostly high precision items that require highly trained individuals. Also, automobiles.

    Labor prices are the primary driver. Average labor wage in China is $3.60. It is $2.60 in Mexico. I am not sure with our current cost of living how we could compete with that...other then making $2,500 washing machines. It is a vicious cycle. If we try and move toward more durable goods and higher quality items, it will cost us more. We either have to lower the cost of living, or change our consumer mentality. Good luck with either of those.
    That's pretty much what Chapelle was saying in a funnier way.

    Let's do some livin'
    After, we die

  14. #9764
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    You don't buy my hypothesis that only a fraction of the population is susceptible? Has this ever been observed with any other virus, or is every virus that can infect humans infect all humans (other than those who have acquired antibodies)? I know it's far fetched, but possible?
    Maybe, but the SARS-CoV-2 viral entryway is the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, or ACE2 receptor. That's a universal human biological component. The virus has a spike protein that uses the ACE2 receptor to gain entry into the human body. Other viruses use different receptors so perhaps it's the case with other viral strains that there is a subset of susceptibility.

  15. #9765
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    Quote Originally Posted by The AD View Post
    Some promising data in Washington State. Both confirmed cases and deaths have been decreasing over the last few days.

    Data from https://www.doh.wa.gov/Emergencies/Coronavirus
    Very favourable! Pulling for WA state!

  16. #9766
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    Quote Originally Posted by MultiVerse View Post
    This first 30 minutes of the virology podcast linked below features Daniel Griffin, MD, a New York doctor describing the situation on the ground.

    Podcast:http://www.microbe.tv/twiv/
    Yes!

    Another plug for TWiV.
    “This Week in Virology”
    The podcast has got to be some of the most informed reporting and discussion on coronavirus there is.

    Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler
    All PhDs: two current professors, two emeritus, one science writer.

    And you can email them questions.
    "Send your virology questions and comments to twiv@microbe.tv"

    From an email,

    "Powerful laser technology reveals normally invisible saliva droplets that are generated by speech and are able to transmit the virus that causes COVID-19."

    This weeks questions included some from professors of medicine, MDs, PhDs, MD PhDs, someone who works for Genentech. Part of their shtick is that the hosts introduce themselves with the local weather. So for his question, Topper in Reno let them know, "32 F/ 0 C, slightly snowing. All the snow is coming after the pandemic closed the ski resorts.”

  17. #9767
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    That's pretty much what Chapelle was saying in a funnier way.
    Also, we're not better at building cars. What on earth would give someone that idea? We're better at building vehicles there's no market for anywhere else in the world, and that's about it. Hell, Ford -Ford!- gave up on building cars. Who's better than the Chinese? GM? Hm. Chrysler??

  18. #9768
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    Jan 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by MultiVerse View Post
    Maybe, but the SARS-CoV-2 viral entryway is the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, or ACE2 receptor. That's a universal human biological component. The virus has a spike protein that uses the ACE2 receptor to gain entry into the human body. Other viruses use different receptors so perhaps it's the case with other viral strains that there is a subset of susceptibility.
    ^^
    Knows his shit ...


    Plus ... stop smoking now and you can potentially reduce your immediate risk (and no they didn't look at weed AFAICT)

    https://twitter.com/JSheltzer/status...15018627883011

  19. #9769
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    These people predicted it in 2015:



    https://microbiology.utmb.edu/facult...-menachery-phd
    https://twitter.com/TheMenacheryLab



    https://sph.unc.edu/adv_profile/lisa-gralinski-phd/
    https://twitter.com/lisagralinski

    “A SARS-like cluster of circulating bat coronaviruses shows potential for human emergence”
    https://www.nature.com/articles/nm.3985

    15 coauthors. Ten from the University of North Carolina, one from the FDA, one from ETH Zurich, one from Harvard, and two from the Wuhan Institute of Virology.

    Their warning in January,
    Return of the Coronavirus: 2019-nCoV
    https://www.mdpi.com/1999-4915/12/2/135/htm

  20. #9770
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    "9,298 new cases in New York State since yesterday
    5,686 new cases in New York City
    In part this seems to be due to more testing: 18,645 tested yesterday vs. 14K-16K on several recent days
    But also, % testing positive is up: 49.8% of tests were positive yesterday"

    Saw the above online and I cannot verify the source although this site suggests that 30% of all tested in NY historically are positive.
    https://covidtracking.com/data/state/new-york/#history

    Still only symptomatic people being tested. Da FUQ!?!?

  21. #9771
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    Jan 2007
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    Italy ... nice trend showing a decrease in the rate of new daily cases. Death rate remains high and will lag the daily rate of increase by a week or two.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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  22. #9772
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    This is pretty much why we should just let Las Vegas rot after all this.

    Las Vegas and Coronavirus: Homeless People Placed in a Parking Lot https://nyti.ms/3dLt4Gq

    "The casinos are deserted and thousands of hotel rooms are empty. But when Las Vegas, gripped by the coronavirus, needed space for a temporary homeless shelter, officials chose a location that does not have walls, or even a roof: an outdoor parking lot.

    The City of Las Vegas and Clark County on Saturday opened the shelter, on the upper floor of a convention center parking lot, after the temporary closure of a 500-person homeless shelter run by Catholic Charities after a homeless man there tested positive for the coronavirus.

    Medical students from Touro University, wearing protective gear, have been tasked with screening each homeless person for coronavirus symptoms before they enter the parking area, which has been partly covered with blue mats and closed off by metal barriers. The ďshelterĒ will remain open until Friday, when the Catholic Charities shelter is expected to reopen, according to a joint statement by the city and county."

    Let's do some livin'
    After, we die

  23. #9773
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    May 2002
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    30,978
    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    11 million people in Wuhan. 60 million in Hubei. No shipments for months. People die regardless of coronavirus. where ya gonna put the ashes?

    This doesn't debunk your theory but it does present a counterpoint. Consider it, and the fact that every internet loon on earth thinks you're right, as you ponder.
    What/who is this in response to, Ice? Cono Este?

  24. #9774
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    Are you sure those are now growlers? Wuhan Brewery makes a killer DIPA. Maybe they are exporting again.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rideski View Post
    Reportedly, this is a real picture of way more urns than Wuhan should actually need given their previous death rate numbers.
    Getting shipments of 5000 urns multiples times equals more than the number of dead reported.
    Screen grabbed from a Chinese news source.
    Attachment 323023
    Attachment 323022

    Feel free to debunk.

  25. #9775
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    Quote Originally Posted by gretch6364 View Post
    This may have something to do with you not doing yoga.



    I have to disagree with this. There are a lot of things we still manufacture and do it better then they can in China. However, it is mostly high precision items that require highly trained individuals. Also, automobiles.

    Labor prices are the primary driver. Average labor wage in China is $3.60. It is $2.60 in Mexico. I am not sure with our current cost of living how we could compete with that...other then making $2,500 washing machines. It is a vicious cycle. If we try and move toward more durable goods and higher quality items, it will cost us more. We either have to lower the cost of living, or change our consumer mentality. Good luck with either of those.
    Kind of sort of not true. The main driver is corporate profits. Period. You still throw down $600 for an arcteryx jacket even thought itís made for $40 in China. You could still sell it for $600 even it it cost $100 to make. However that brand has been flipped and sold so many times by PE that Itís debt load was ridiculous. Same with washing machines. Whirlpool is made in America and cost the same as ge, which is haeir and now made in China. Margin on ge is probably higher.
    We are ok with Nike and under armor giving athletes contracts for tens of millions and executives 10 of millions but seldom are those cost savings passed on to the consumer. Maybe cheap stuff like old navy but many high quality durable goods we waste money on like coolers, reels, skis outerwear etc can be made domestically. Germany is a an example of this

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