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  1. #1
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    Custom Footbeds For Cycling, Anyone? (X-Post)

    So, I have been having trouble with a hotspot on 50+ mile rides. Looking for a very thin, moldable footbed that will fit in a cycling shoe without taking up much volume. Can anyone advise?
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  2. #2
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    Canít speak to the cycling side of it, but I really like my SOLE footbeds. And they have a couple Thin models.
    That said, I canít help thinking itís the shoe. Whereís the hotspot?


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  3. #3
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    On the outside right, basically just in front of the middle of my foot. If my foot were a car, basically where the b pillar separates the front door from the back door.
    I hope that makes sense.
    StokePimpin' ain't easy

  4. #4
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    Couple of thoughts. Specialized sells footbeds:

    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/bo...tbeds/p/130590

    As an alternative and if we're talking road shoes, I have Bont shoes where the whole of the shoe goes into the oven and then molds to your foot.

    https://bontcycling.com/items/support/heat-molding.html

    They're obviously very comfortable.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    I canít help thinking itís the shoe.
    That was my thought too
    Shoe isnít stiff enough

  6. #6
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    I've been using SOLE Softec Ultras in my Giro Privateers for a little over a year. Took a few rides to get the shoe to fit right but I've had no issues with hot spots since then. Several 200km brevets completed and a couple 12-hour bikepacking days with zero feet issues.

  7. #7
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    What shoe and what pedal? If SPD or similar small cleat, is this on a road bike?

    The only time I notice hot spot pressure in a bike shoe is if I am trying to use a softer sole shoe on a small cleat (SPD), on road rides. This was with a lace up Shimano shoe that's more of a casual ride shoe, on a touring bike, with a small SPD pedal. I switched to using a larger SPD pedal (A520 - like a one sided Trail pedal) and the pressure went away.

    On stiff sole road shoes with large cleats (Look), I can't feel anything through the sole of the shoe.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  8. #8
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    Actually, it’s the opposite. It’s a very stiff road shoe with a shimano road cleat that gives me the problem. I rode two centuries this year on the gravel bike with mt bike shoes (terraduros) and spd’s With no pain whatsoever. I pretty much only get cost on Giro, so I would like to try a few things with these shoes first before ditching them, but I will if I have to. There is nowhere local to try on many different shoes, unfortunately.
    StokePimpin' ain't easy

  9. #9
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    My Giro Empire road shoes came with a nice footbed with three different arch supports that velcro in. That said, they're not super comfortable yet. I don't ride road that much and they might just need to break in more. I usually get along with all Giro shoes but sometimes they need to break in before they're comfortable.

    I used my custom footbeds from my ski boots in XC shoes one season and it was awesome but they got pretty beat up in there. They're expensive and I need them more in my ski boots. Found that the off-the-shelf Superfeet in blue work well enough for me in MTB shoes. They run about $25 so I can afford to put them in multiple pairs of shoes. Superfeet make a higher end cork one that's conformable that would prolly be better. Bottom line though, custom will always be the end-all-be-all. Of course you're gonna pay a lot for those. The cheaper options are worth a shot and may work for you but if you have real problems custom would be worth it IMO.
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  10. #10
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    I have some that I had made 15 years ago when I rode longer distances/time. Superfeet Holofiber. Heat molded; unweighted. Super comfortable and durable.

    Doubt theyíre doing them any more. Can likely get similar results from reg, low volume Superfeet insole (carbon?)

  11. #11
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    I have an old pair of cork foot beds made back when I alpined, had no need for them when I switched to tele (weren't made to be bent). A few years back I put them in my biking shoes and they work great.
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  12. #12
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    There used to be a really thin custom Footbed called a Peterson bio-skate. Some of the Buck Hill Minnesota ski racers used them because they were real low volume. I don't know if these are made any more but you could check with hockey shops that do custom work.

  13. #13
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    The foot has three arches, putting a little support under the anterior transverse arch (runs l to R under ball of our foot) prevents splat and splay of the toes, sounds like that would help narrow up your foot just a touch and provide the support needed. I have Aline insoles i use in my nordic boots, use custom footbeds in my alpine, and use nothing in my cycling shoes, as the Alines take up a little too much volume. I think a thin superfeet or sole should help, and the BG specialized insoles are good.
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