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  1. #676
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    everyday sunshine
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    260
    As a lurker from NYC who used to live in Vancouver, I’m jealous as hell of what you guys have access to right now.

    Mostly, that your government is going about this in a scientific manner and testing like crazy, but also that there are all these beautiful places so close at hand.

    Responsible enjoyment of the outdoors is key to keeping sane in these kinds of circumstances. Parks are difficult to social distance in (especially for children) Hiking, biking, skiing is naturally solitary.

    Anyway, can we keep this thread a safe space for pictures so those of us who are far away can daydream a bit?

  2. #677
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    812
    Just post the pics but say they were from 2019 and we'll know what you mean but nobody will be upset.

  3. #678
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    Jun 2004
    Location
    Pemberton, BC
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulster2626 View Post
    Just post the pics but say they were from 2019 and we'll know what you mean but nobody will be upset.
    Sorry. there will be no stoke! I'll either get accused of stressing the medical system, creating FOMO or trying to prove how rad I am. This thread is reserved for hate only.

  4. #679
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    North Vancouver/Whistler
    Posts
    11,775
    Quadruple overhead baby's breath blower pow down CoronaVirus Bowl for the 10 people irl who actually read TGR

    #followme #influencer

    Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #680
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    755
    Seems like its all over now anyway. BC Parks just got officially shut. Avalanche danger would be super high right now. Hoping to see Hanging roll go massive from my patio.

  6. #681
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Pemberton, BC
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    1,573
    Quote Originally Posted by nortonwhis View Post
    Seems like its all over now anyway. BC Parks just got officially shut. Avalanche danger would be super high right now. Hoping to see Hanging roll go massive from my patio.
    Yup. I'm pretty much done. I've got little interest in awakening the sleeping dragon.

  7. #682
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Vancouver BC
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    2,893
    Personally I don’t have an issue with the ppl on this thread that know what they are doing being out skiing/biking in their local communities. Problem is dumbass citiots seeing it and validating that it’s ok for them to drive up to the Duffey for a “mellow day” (driving 6 hours and you are just going to walk around in the woods? Sure) or crowding Squamish bike trails.

    Saw some lady asking if she could do exactly that on South Coast touring. Saw some wannabe YouTuber from Vancouver on the trail shredders group riding REFR at Vedder in the snow/mud on a hard tail crashing all over the place saying he was “within his limit”. These turds are the ones creating further risk and should just be staying at home (as I am doing).

  8. #683
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Vancouver Island
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    1,810
    I think the problem is that everyone thinks they know what they are doing - regardless of reality. This leads into the issue of how does a governing body police who knows what they are doing vs who doesn’t? Obviously too many people are not capable of self-policing - this is proven almost daily in life, covid-19 or no.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    "...if you're not doing a double flip cork something, skiing spines in Haines, or doing double flip cork somethings off spines in Haines, you're pretty much just gaping."

  9. #684
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Pemberton, BC
    Posts
    1,573

    Whistler 2019 - 2020

    I get the feeling within a week we are all going to be on house arrest. On my door to door ride today I bumped into quite a few people who I’m pretty sure weren’t local. The guilty looking faces gave it away. The weather is nice and people are bored. They will be leaving their community. Saw a group of like a 8 20 somethings sitting together at a view point smoking weed. Maybe they all live together but doubt it. We’re doomed.

  10. #685
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    256
    i really hate the "you're not responsible enough to go into the backcountry without requiring SAR and hospitalization so we're closing all of the backcountry" argument. this is usually supported by the "sure you say you're going to do something mellow, but let me tell you about this guy i knew who broke his neck on a 20 deg slope" argument. that's an anecdote, not data.

    the question i try to rationally answer is: if i want to get some fresh air and exercise, do i pose more of a risk to myself and others by going into the backcountry or going for a walk to my local park.

    the last couple times i went to my favourite local prov park and hiked to the snowline from the closest access point i saw 1-2 other people at a distance of 100m, because the roads are closed and people are lazy. i estimate i have been backcountry skiing about 300 days in my life - not once have i required SAR or medical care. so the only data available suggests that the probability of my requiring those things on my next trip out, when i am going to be more cautious than i have ever been in my backcountry skiing career, is basically zero.

    what about if i go for a walk to the park? i live in downtown vancouver so on my way to the park and when i get to the park, the number of people per unit area will be probably about 1000 times higher than it would be in the backcountry. despite social distancing, my likelihood of transmitting or contracting the virus is orders of magnitude higher walking to my local park than getting in my car, driving to my local prov park and getting into the backcountry.

    any way i look at this, the objectively better option is to go into the backcountry
    Last edited by raypruit; 04-08-2020 at 11:31 PM.

  11. #686
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    812
    Personally I don't see the big deal in just staying home for x weeks/months so this thing gets under control a little quicker. It's a once-in-a-lifetime event, and until there's a legit treatment or cure then lots of people are going to die. Literally hiding from this in our homes is our only defense right now.

    There will be other opportunities to do what we love to do.

  12. #687
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    [a] Van [down by the river]
    Posts
    1,285
    We don't need to get into the ethics of it. That is discussed at lengths here:

    https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...es-of-COVID-19

    The conversation for me was more about the visibility of it. Whether we should or shouldn't go skiing/biking/whatever, we'll all have different opinions, but my thought was, if you DO, maybe just keep it on the DL for now...

  13. #688
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    812
    Quote Originally Posted by kalisto View Post
    We don't need to get into the ethics of it. That is discussed at lengths here:

    https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...es-of-COVID-19

    The conversation for me was more about the visibility of it. Whether we should or shouldn't go skiing/biking/whatever, we'll all have different opinions, but my thought was, if you DO, maybe just keep it on the DL for now...
    That thread just feels like a different conversation though. Like, I don't know how to say this without sounding pretentious, but it seems like if you tell people in Canada they can't do something you'll get a "oh, really? hmm maybe yeah that's a good idea" response. But in the USA, personal freedom and an anti-government stance seem to be more prominent.

    Not saying either is better or worse than the other, just that given different contexts the conversation seems to be different.

    But yeah, you're right. Keep it on the DL - but take pictures please so we can see what we were all up to once the pandemic shitstorm is over!

  14. #689
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    69
    There is another issue regarding activities involving potential risk of injury. My wife and I are avid skiers and dirt bikers but she is a nurse and pointed our that probably the last place you want to be right now is in a hospital ER waiting room. So as much as it pains both of us, we are sticking to walks with the dog. I may start the bikes just to sniff that glorious two stroke exhaust.

  15. #690
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    256
    What I'm saying is that for myself and other experienced backcountry users, I do less harm from a public health perspective by going into the backcountry than going for a walk in my neighborhood. Going into the backcountry is the socially responsible recreational option for me right now. This may seem to suit my desires (and it does I'll admit) but I can't see how this can be argued rationally.

    Of course the govt can't restrict backcountry use to "experienced users" but what they can and have done is restrict road access such that only experienced users are going to be in the backcountry but keep it open

  16. #691
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    812
    All good - have fun and be safe everyone. Soon this will be over and we can go back to complaining about the blackcomb gondola reliability issues.

  17. #692
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    bestcoast
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    1,576
    are you going into the backcountry directly from your place of residence? if not, how do you reconcile "no non-essential travel" with travel for recreational purposes?

  18. #693
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    Jun 2009
    Location
    South of 49
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    1,030
    People in the rural areas need things that people in the city take for granted. Similarily, people in the city need the things that people in rural areas take for granted (i.e. trails, space, fresh air, silence). Shutting everything down to those trying to get out and do something healthy is a shame in my opinion. On the other hand, we have seen many people everywhere that are not as conscientious about social distancing as we are.

    Oh well. This truly is fucked. It is going to lead to the eventual questions about 'how many deaths is too many?", "what would people have considered reasonable in a different era, and why?", "what measures actually are effective?". Well, obviously getting people to stop interacting works from a physical-biologocal-interface perspective. Let's see how long everyone can sustain this.

    sidenote: We were in Sun Valley on a road trip a month ago. We were unreasonably paranoid about all surfaces and sharing the gondola. And, of course, luck ....

    We left 1 day before the 700 members of the National Brotherhood of Skiers arrived to party hard. We knew that was kinda prudent given the amount of people expected and news reports on spreading contagion. Little did we know just how smart leaving early was.

    https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-...-in-the-nation

    No one gets a cocky-asshole-pass yet until we are out of lockdown and receive the all clear.
    Stay safe bros. I really hope they don't have gondola issues again next year ... Please. Pretty please.

  19. #694
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    256
    Quote Originally Posted by t.odd View Post
    are you going into the backcountry directly from your place of residence? if not, how do you reconcile "no non-essential travel" with travel for recreational purposes?
    stepping out your door for anything other than groceries, including a walk to the park, is non-essential travel. do you step outside your door for exercise? non-essential. if you are being a perfectly socially responsible citizen, you ONLY step out your door for food. i don't do that and i suspect you don't either.

    if i do decide to leave my residence for exercise, driving to north van from downtown vancouver and hiking/touring in a prov park is safer for the public than my taking a walk around the block. there is no rational way to argue this.

  20. #695
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    Dec 2010
    Location
    whistler
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    1,072
    Quote Originally Posted by raypruit View Post
    stepping out your door for anything other than groceries, including a walk to the park, is non-essential travel. do you step outside your door for exercise? non-essential. if you are being a perfectly socially responsible citizen, you ONLY step out your door for food. i don't do that and i suspect you don't either.

    if i do decide to leave my residence for exercise, driving to north van from downtown vancouver and hiking/touring in a prov park is safer for the public than my taking a walk around the block. there is no rational way to argue this.
    So long as you do exactly zero interacting anywhere other than your area of residence then I agree. No getting gas or stopping for a snack etc.

    It is a massive worry for small communities that it gets out and tears the place apart. I can tell you that in pemberton we have zero ventilators or ICU beds.

    Do your thing though, we're all just trying not to lose our god damn minds.

  21. #696
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    198
    Lol, everyone's having the same conversation over and over and over

  22. #697
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    Dec 2010
    Location
    Vancouver Island
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    1,810
    Quote Originally Posted by raypruit View Post
    this is usually supported by the "sure you say you're going to do something mellow, but let me tell you about this guy i knew who broke his neck on a 20 deg slope" argument. that's an anecdote, not data.

    i estimate i have been backcountry skiing about 300 days in my life - not once have i required SAR or medical care.
    You do realize you are presenting an anecdotal story that suits your desires? It’s a valid point you make, though; No one has ever gotten injured or had things go wrong on their 300th trip - that’s why guides, backcountry enthusiasts , mtbikers, etc never die/need SAR or wind up in the hospital.

    Statistically, the more people going into the backcountry, the more often SAR is required and the higher the likelihood of someone winding up needing medical care. That is what the statistics say.
    "...if you're not doing a double flip cork something, skiing spines in Haines, or doing double flip cork somethings off spines in Haines, you're pretty much just gaping."

  23. #698
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Pemberton, BC
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    1,573
    Quote Originally Posted by shafty85 View Post

    Statistically, the more people going into the backcountry, the more often SAR is required and the higher the likelihood of someone winding up needing medical care. That is what the statistics say.
    But risk doesn’t only apply to the backcountry. As per the ethics thread:

    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    Anyone who thinks they can do literally anything 100% safe is kidding themselves.

  24. #699
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    256
    Quote Originally Posted by shafty85 View Post
    You do realize you are presenting an anecdotal story that suits your desires? It’s a valid point you make, though; No one has ever gotten injured or had things go wrong on their 300th trip - that’s why guides, backcountry enthusiasts , mtbikers, etc never die/need SAR or wind up in the hospital.

    Statistically, the more people going into the backcountry, the more often SAR is required and the higher the likelihood of someone winding up needing medical care. That is what the statistics say.
    actually i've presented data, the exact opposite of an anecdote. you're missing the point here. when someone says "we should ban kids toys because you can slip on one and end up in the hospital", you laugh it off. you don't say "yeah you're right - the more kids toys there are, the higher the likelihood of slipping and ending up in the hospital - that's what the stats say so out with the toys". it's true that the more toys, the higher the risk of slipping but besides being so obvious it doesn't need stating, it's a completely irrelevant point. you have good reason to laugh it off because you know the probability of this happening is very low even if you don't have exact numbers - low enough that you dismiss it as not a valid concern.

    yeah, things go wrong for people on their 300th trip and that's why guides need SAR, but the probability of that happening on any given day is extremely low. if you wanted to calculate the probability of an experienced user requiring SAR on their next day out, you take the total number of times all experienced users have ever required SAR and divide that by the total number of times they have ever been out in the backcountry - it's a pretty small number. for shits, i'll take the data (not anecdote) from my group of friends. i'm one of a group of 8 friends who are all equally experienced. on average we all have 300 days each. none of us have ever required SAR, but let's pretend one of us did once. based on this dataset, the probability that one of us will require SAR on our next trip out is 1/2400 = 0.04%.

    what is the probability of me transmitting or contracting the virus when i pass 100 people on my walk to the park on a sunny long weekend in downtown vancouver? i don't know exactly, but i would bet my life it's a lot higher than 0.04%

    so you tell me which option should i pick?

  25. #700
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Pemberton, BC
    Posts
    1,573
    The only difference is is that skiing is fun. And you’re an asshole for having fun during a pandemic.

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