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  1. #26
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    Iíve known a few Samsung appliances to die unexpectedly within the first year (fridge and clothes washer). My current stove Iím replacing is a new cheap Samsung electric glass top and it is terrible... Iíll likely avoid them.


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  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    Something in my monkey brain really likes that blue flame. Gas is a requirement.


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    This

    Find a stove restorer and get an original O'Keefe and Merrit, Wedgewood or similar. Way better then any POS built today including all the dentist owned Wolfes and such. Our 50's vintage Wedgewood was the best stove I ever cooked on, unfortunately as tough as they are house fires are tougher. We are having a 30's vintage Magic Chef rebuilt for the new house. There is a great dealer/restorer here in Ventura (he ships, but probably not affordable. )

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  3. #28
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    POSs built today have electric ignition. Pilot light is a non-starter for this guy.

    The grill is a good wok option. You can get attachments for Weber and BGE style grills, or just rig something up or plop it right into some hot coals. Nice to keep all that smoke outside.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  4. #29
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    we have an induction cooktop

    pros:
    - as mentioned above
    - excellent low temp control
    - auto-off without ferrous contact

    cons:
    - if you have a boil-over, you kind of have to stop what you're doing and clean up cuz it's going over your countertop onto the cabinet fronts and the floor & the contact surface is now all capillary action so you have to wipe off the bottom of your pot/pan w/out scalding yourself or spilling further (lesson: watch yer shit & don't have a boil-over)
    - need not just ferrous pots/pans, but ones with flat bottoms -- that roasting pan with a juice ring at the perimeter can't be deglazed without going out to the grill
    - wok don't wok quite like with fire cuz only the contact point is sizzling hot...can be done for smaller batches just fine

    i still like it a lot, but, as with anything, we've had our moments



    one feature i like that is peculiar to ours is a larger combo cook surface (multiple zones acting as a single for larger cook area) -- if you go induction, look for it

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    Iíve known a few Samsung appliances to die unexpectedly within the first year (fridge and clothes washer). My current stove Iím replacing is a new cheap Samsung electric glass top and it is terrible... Iíll likely avoid them.
    Fair enough, but I'll caution you on a few things:

    All manufacturers have stuff that dies early. One or two or even three dead appliances are just bad luck. CR has nice ratings of overall appliance performance. They are a good guide but not foolproof. I've had good GE and kitchenaid stuff die on me - just the luck of the draw. People will always have this recency bias against something that has failed them. It's nto rational. it's also funny how one couple will come in hating LG and get Kitchenaid, and the next couple will show up hating Kitchenaid and get LG. I rely on our appliance suppliers as they see all the problems. They are big on samsung and LG ovens, Kitchenaid dishwashers (put then mine broke, so shit happens) and samsung and GE refrigs.

    Also, something that was built 5 years ago has zero reflection on a 2020 model from any brand, reliability wise. It sucks when people say their GE stuff was great so they want GE, and then they move in and it breaks. Past performance doesn't equal future results.

  6. #31
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    We have an LG gas oven/range combo (a standard size "drop in") that came with the house, and is about 10 years old now. It's running on propane. 5-burner range, with the middle burner a large oval that has a drop-in griddle. We never use that middle burner, and think it's a waste of space -- a frying pan on a regular burner works better for pancakes.

    I have had to repair only one thing on the LG so far: oven ignitor failed (easy, parts on Amazon). One burner ignitor is on its way out (takes awhile to light while sparking; it's just wearing out). Only real complaint I have about the entire thing is that the range burner knobs are cheap: they look like stainless, but are just plastic with stainless-colored stickers wrapped around them, and the stickers have bubbled a little due to heat from cooking. Function fine, just looks (and is) cheap.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    What do you guys like? ]
    I don't remember ever buying a stove but I must have for that 1st new house, I am a minimalist altho I thot self-cleaning was pretty rad, I like whatever is already in the house ( glass top GE right now ) that stays running, IME outside of changing a few oven elements stoves are pretty bomber, every stove I have ever owned has been > 20 yrs old, so maybe the old stuff is more reliable ?

    I got a buddy with one of them huge gas stoves that is so big they can't get it out with demolishing the island, he sez the pilot light for a 6 burner pro quality stove will run up the gas bill even if they are away for a month without anybody using the stove
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  8. #33
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    Dec 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    The reasons I have heard for the above are:
    - better temp control
    - true convection
    - better cleaning

    Any other reasons?


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    Quote Originally Posted by beece View Post
    Others:

    Adds humidity to the environment (electrical doesn't, which is usually better for most thing people cook)
    More even heat distribution
    Lower frequency of failure
    These things are more manufacturer specific rather than gas vs electric specific. The gas/humidity thing is not an issue, at all.

  9. #34
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    Only true commercial ranges have pilots and for this reason, among others, they're generally not covered by home insurance policies. I've done a LOT of research, as I'd like to have one very much (I'd just disable the pilots and hand-light with a wand), and I have NEVER been able to get a straight answer about insurability of a true comm'l range in a residential application.

    I've asked a lot of people including brokers and it's always an ambiguous answer which basically means, "don't ask, don't tell, and hope no one figures it out if your house burns down". I've yet to get comfortable with that notion, though I have seen them in many homes over the years.

    Tell yer pal to disable the pilots if it's costing that much. Unless he has a commercial sprinkler setup it's probably a little dangerous to have them running all the time. The ranges we're talking about use piezo ignitors so no pilot issues.

    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    I got a buddy with one of them huge gas stoves that is so big they can't get it out with demolishing the island, he sez the pilot light for a 6 burner pro quality stove will run up the gas bill even if they are away for a month without anybody using the stove
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  10. #35
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    It's kind of amazing how much heat pilot lights put out too, which isn't awesome when you're paying to cool the house

  11. #36
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    Others have said similar I bought my mom one of these.
    FYI GE Maytag Kitchen Aid - all the same company made in the same place - They are more than enough for a home

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-5-0-c...B&gclsrc=aw.ds
    Own your fail. ~Jer~

  12. #37
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    Real commercial stuff also has less fireproofing as they expect it not to be placed against flammable surfaces.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by oftpiste View Post
    Only true commercial ranges have pilots and for this reason, among others, they're generally not covered by home insurance policies. I've done a LOT of research, as I'd like to have one very much (I'd just disable the pilots and hand-light with a wand), and I have NEVER been able to get a straight answer about insurability of a true comm'l range in a residential application.

    I've asked a lot of people including brokers and it's always an ambiguous answer which basically means, "don't ask, don't tell, and hope no one figures it out if your house burns down". I've yet to get comfortable with that notion, though I have seen them in many homes over the years.

    Tell yer pal to disable the pilots if it's costing that much. Unless he has a commercial sprinkler setup it's probably a little dangerous to have them running all the time. The ranges we're talking about use piezo ignitors so no pilot issues.
    For a commercial kitchen with a commercial stove to meet code you need to have an Ansul system and a fuseable smoke/fire damper in the hood. If you installed the same at your house it would be hard for home insurance to give you a good reason to not cover. Youíd essentially have a fire extinguisher pointed at your stove 24/7. But thatís a lot of money...


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  14. #39
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    Did you click my link? Half off 700$ right now
    Own your fail. ~Jer~

  15. #40
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    I believe it might be not to code in some instances but I have read hundreds of homeowner policies and I have never seen any language about commercial appliances.

  16. #41
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    And little to no insulation in the oven door so it's easy for hands to be burned. My thought on the flammable surfaces would be to line the enclosure with something fireproof. Steel with a little air gap maybe or....?

    Quote Originally Posted by schuss View Post
    Real commercial stuff also has less fireproofing as they expect it not to be placed against flammable surfaces.
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by oftpiste View Post
    And little to no insulation in the oven door so it's easy for hands to be burned. My thought on the flammable surfaces would be to line the enclosure with something fireproof. Steel with a little air gap maybe or....?
    You'd need to build to commercial code to have any chance, which likely means fire suppression system as well.

  18. #43
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    Interesting. Code is a different subject I think. As far as I know insurers don't (or in reality can't) insist on current code as it changes all the time and so many homes were built when code was much different. Same in a real estate transaction. Appraisers look for hazards, but never call out code issues.

    Have you ever seen requirements that a range has to have insulated surfaces if they're up against a flammable surface or anything like that?
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by schuss View Post
    You'd need to build to commercial code to have any chance, which likely means fire suppression system as well.
    Fire suppression really only becomes a practical issue if you're leaving the pilots on.
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by oftpiste View Post
    Interesting. Code is a different subject I think. As far as I know insurers don't (or in reality can't) insist on current code as it changes all the time and so many homes were built when code was much different. Same in a real estate transaction. Appraisers look for hazards, but never call out code issues.

    Have you ever seen requirements that a range has to have insulated surfaces if they're up against a flammable surface or anything like that?
    There's minimums to flammable material as part of commercial kitchen equipment install specs. All I know is regardless, it's a good way to get denied if your house ever burned down.

  21. #46
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    Commercial kitchens also have standards about air turnover to maintain air quality. Your house does to, but it's designed to be pretty damn airtight if it was built in the last 10-15 years. Not sure I would want pilot lights burning constantly in my kitchen unless I had a whole house ventilation system too. You don't want to be breathing more natural gas combustion byproducts than you have to.

    FWIW, the majority of new homes being built in my jurisdiction right now have whole house fire suppression systems. Not all, but truly at least 50% of new construction here is sprinkled, although it obviously does not include the kind of system you see in commercial hoods. Any home over 3500 square feet of fire area requires a supression system, and with how FA is calculated, it's easy to hit that number.
    Set my compass North, I got Winter in my blood.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by papapoopski View Post
    These things are more manufacturer specific rather than gas vs electric specific. The gas/humidity thing is not an issue, at all.
    Burning natural gas produces water. Electricity does not. This is why bakers prefer electric stoves.

    Edit:
    From the Cafe brand website:
    One area where electric cooking does excel is in baking. Electric ovens heat consistently and more evenly than gas ovens. They also provide a drier air, which is much better for roasting and broiling. Electric ovens with true European convection, like on the Cafť slide-in range, are very precise in temperature and circulate the heated air so that foods bake evenly for near perfect results.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTT View Post
    Others have said similar I bought my mom one of these.
    FYI GE Maytag Kitchen Aid - all the same company made in the same place - They are more than enough for a home
    Not quite:

    GE, Fisher Paykel, Haier, Hotpoint, Monogram all owned by Haier
    Whirlpool, Jenn-Air Maytag, Roper and Kitchenaid all owned by Whirlpool
    Samsung and Dacor owned by Samsung
    LG is just LG

    They are not made in the same place. When Haier bought GE they just bought the division. They didn't change the factories they were built in.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by schuss View Post
    There's minimums to flammable material as part of commercial kitchen equipment install specs. All I know is regardless, it's a good way to get denied if your house ever burned down.
    This. Is less in the building codes and more int he installation requirements for the product. Though commercial appliances get weird with code requirements, because they have clearances to flammable surfaces, which then calls in the code.

    As alluded to below but in more detail, commercial cooking appliances typically have airflow requirements that are well beyond the residential vent systems. That means commercial hoods, which means conditioned (heated or cooled) make up air.

    Can of worms.

  25. #50
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    Getting out of the weeds, I like thermador. It's double the OP's price point, but if you're serious about cooking..

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