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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutash View Post
    This

    Find a stove restorer and get an original O'Keefe and Merrit, Wedgewood or similar. Way better then any POS built today including all the dentist owned Wolfes and such. Our 50's vintage Wedgewood was the best stove I ever cooked on, unfortunately as tough as they are house fires are tougher. We are having a 30's vintage Magic Chef rebuilt for the new house. There is a great dealer/restorer here in Ventura (he ships, but probably not affordable. )
    Late 80's/early 90's my wife and I did set decorating and props for movies, commercials, and videos. We could find vintage stoves in downtown L.A. in great condition in thrift shops for $300, cheaper if you haggled. We'd buy them and use them for shoots and then someone would buy it to take home, including us. Soon, you started seeing a bunch of them in TV series like Friends. Prices shot through the roof. An O'keefe and Merrit or Wedgewood with the salt and pepper shakers was now over a thousand dollars.

    There was a guy who went into business in south L.A. who totally reconditioned vintage stoves, re-coated them in swinging colors, absolutely gorgeous stuff. We'd drive by and almost crash looking at them. Prices were crazy to us at the time.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by I Skied Bandini Mountain View Post
    Getting out of the weeds, I like thermador. It's double the OP's price point, but if you're serious about cooking..
    Thermador is owned by BSH of Germany, it's basically the midprice product between Bosch and Gaggenau in the BSH lineup.

  3. #53
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    Practically speaking, restaurants often have many burners running for hours at a time simultaneously requiring big fans. That wouldn't be the case in my kitchen, so venting and airflow are less of a concern. And no one is going to do a code inspection on me like they would in a restaurant.

    As a practical matter the biggest challenge in my kitchen would be making sure the oven doesn't ignite anything on the back and sides. Seems like some 16th inch steel lining the flammable surfaces would do the trick.

    That and the insurance question.

    Quote Originally Posted by beece View Post
    This. Is less in the building codes and more int he installation requirements for the product. Though commercial appliances get weird with code requirements, because they have clearances to flammable surfaces, which then calls in the code.

    As alluded to below but in more detail, commercial cooking appliances typically have airflow requirements that are well beyond the residential vent systems. That means commercial hoods, which means conditioned (heated or cooled) make up air.

    Can of worms.
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by skaredshtles View Post
    Hmmm... interesting.

    Anyone find a solution to the induction/wok issue?
    We have a cast iron wok; it works just fine on an induction or electric stove.

  5. #55
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    Dec 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by beece View Post
    Burning natural gas produces water. Electricity does not. This is why bakers prefer electric stoves.

    Edit:
    From the Cafe brand website:
    One area where electric cooking does excel is in baking. Electric ovens heat consistently and more evenly than gas ovens. They also provide a drier air, which is much better for roasting and broiling. Electric ovens with true European convection, like on the Cafť slide-in range, are very precise in temperature and circulate the heated air so that foods bake evenly for near perfect results.
    Bakers do not prefer electric.

    Bakers typically will add steam to the baking process depending upon the type of food being cooked.

    That quote from the Cafe site is regurgitated by many other manufacturers. It's lazy copy and paste and it's false.

    For those talking about disabling the pilots on commercial ranges, that's a good way to blow up your house. A commercial oven has a safety valve for the pilot, the top burners do not. If a burner knob gets bumped and turned on with no pilot, gas flows freely until it finds an ignition source.

  6. #56
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    Kitchen Range Reccos

    Quote Originally Posted by papapoopski View Post
    Bakers do not prefer electric.

    Bakers typically will add steam to the baking process depending upon the type of food being cooked.

    That quote from the Cafe site is regurgitated by many other manufacturers. It's lazy copy and paste and it's false.

    For those talking about disabling the pilots on commercial ranges, that's a good way to blow up your house. A commercial oven has a safety valve for the pilot, the top burners do not. If a burner knob gets bumped and turned on with no pilot, gas flows freely until it finds an ignition source.
    Ok. Among other things, we design commercial kitchens for restaurants. Including bakers. I will let them know they are wrong.

    We have many clients (most) that use gas. But gas ovens and electric convection are different and are used for different things.

    I think I remember that you might be in the restaurant business. I respect that. However you and I disagree based on my professional experience. Iím ok with that as long as the conversation stays respectful.
    Last edited by beece; 11-14-2019 at 08:37 PM.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by oftpiste View Post
    And no one is going to do a code inspection on me like they would in a restaurant.

    As a practical matter the biggest challenge in my kitchen would be making sure the oven doesn't ignite anything on the back and sides. Seems like some 16th inch steel lining the flammable surfaces would do the trick.

    I guess that means I lost my dinner invite.

    First and foremost, try to adhere to the manufacturer's listed clearances to combustible surfaces when installing. However, if that simply isn't possible, hheet metal with an air gap (make sure it is sized to allow air to circulate around all 4 sides) would likely work. Mounting it flush to whatever surface you're trying to protect won't do anything (Google pyrolysis if you're curious). Another option would be a high R-value fiber board (Micore 160) or ceramic board (Rescor 360) mounted flush to the surfaces you are trying to protect. Both of those boards are 1/2" thick, so they may take up less space than sheet metal with an air gap.
    Set my compass North, I got Winter in my blood.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by beece View Post
    However you and I disagree based on my professional experience. Iím ok with that as long as the conversation stays respectful.
    Agreed.

    Back to household ranges.

    What's your favorite range at the moment?

  9. #59
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    Good to know. I still wonder what the many commercial range installations in residential kitchens I've seen do about this.

    Quote Originally Posted by papapoopski View Post
    For those talking about disabling the pilots on commercial ranges, that's a good way to blow up your house. A commercial oven has a safety valve for the pilot, the top burners do not. If a burner knob gets bumped and turned on with no pilot, gas flows freely until it finds an ignition source.
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  10. #60
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    oft instead of fucking with code and worrying about insurance for a commercial rig just get an aga. those things are badass and you'll be the only one on the block who has one. http://www.agaliving.com/aga-range-c...t-iron-cookers

    Little bit pricey.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    oft instead of fucking with code and worrying about insurance for a commercial rig just get an aga. those things are badass and you'll be the only one on the block who has one. http://www.agaliving.com/aga-range-c...t-iron-cookers

    Little bit pricey.
    Who was the one moaning about always-on heat?
    I could swear someone here was doing that...

  12. #62
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    Right? I've drooled over those for many, many years, though there are probably a few in my 'hood who have them. Way out of my price range these days. Commercial six burners in decent used shape can be had for under $1500.

    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    oft instead of fucking with code and worrying about insurance for a commercial rig just get an aga. those things are badass and you'll be the only one on the block who has one. http://www.agaliving.com/aga-range-c...t-iron-cookers

    Little bit pricey.
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  13. #63
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    I'd set up a flame thrower under a metal ring off a tub of propane on the deck.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  14. #64
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    Maybe in the middle of the kitchen.

    Quote Originally Posted by Buster Highmen View Post
    I'd set up a flame thrower under a metal ring off a tub of propane on the deck.
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by oftpiste View Post
    Maybe in the middle of the kitchen.
    Do we really get that much use out of our islands?

    Mount a flamethrower in there with an insulated metal umbrella in the ceiling (call in Kircher for consultation) and your boots are made for woking
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by papapoopski View Post
    Back to household ranges.

    What's your favorite range at the moment?
    We've had a Frigidaire Gallery gas convection oven/range, for most of a decade now, that we've been really happy with. It has four burners that are all different sizes from each other, including a big one for belting out the heat for big pots/pans, and a very little one for doing those hour-plus slow simmers. It's an attractive unit, too. No gripes worth mentioning, except perhaps that if you spill water on the knobs, you'll have to listen to the sparkers clicking for about a half hour until the water clears the electric switch. I don't recall what we paid, but it was at the higher end of general consumer grade (as opposed to 3x or more of general consumer grade, where the truly high end stuff is).

  17. #67
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    $80? FKNA!

    Quote Originally Posted by Gcooker View Post
    I picked up a Samsung induction, absolutely love it... super easy to clean, no hazing in the glass and is super fast, heating and cooling.
    I haven't been able to find a good wok however and I've tried a few.
    Which model? Convection?

    Our old-school electric coil has finally lost it's mind and I'm tempted to go this route.

  18. #68
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    Induction for us.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackattack View Post
    $80? FKNA!
    Kinda makes you wonder why these fucking 'prosumer' ranges cost $5k, right?

    I wonder how long an LP tank lasts cranking that bitch at 100k BTUs?
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  20. #70
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    We have induction, I too prefer it to gas.

    Everyone who bitches about needing new pots and pans is ignoring the fact that they get to buy new pots and pans.

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by beece View Post
    But gas ovens and electric convection are different and are used for different things.
    Bingo. One of the reasons I lust after a La Cornue range. Some models have BOTH. Dual ovens with one side gas, the other electric. That's the ticket if you ask me, BUT reserved for when I hit the lottery. Haha.

    When it comes to baking, I think it's highly dependent on how good your oven is. Our old gas one sucked for the task with wild temperature fluxuations. It'd dip down a bit too low then it really hit the jets to heat itself back up, going too high. I've had sucky electric ones too. Our new house came with a Samsung electric range (one of their top models) and it keeps it pretty dialed. I'm not recommending Samsung over some of the better brands recommended in here or anything as I'm still not a big fan and I've had a ton of their stuff. I've just come to learn that choosing whether you want gas or electric for baking purposes really goes deeper than one tech over the other. It's really more model dependent. And of course also WHAT you're trying to accomplish as well.

    Personally, like many here, I might check out induction next time. What a cool tech. I just have one little single, tabletop induction burner and it is absolutely insane how fast that thing can boil some water! That little cheap burner blows away any stove burner I've ever had, that's for sure.

  22. #72
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    Re old stoves--we just got rid of an Okeefe and Merritt and glad to do it. It was in the house when we bought it in 1984 but it can't be too old since it has electric ignitors. It was a bear to clean the top, no self clean for the oven, burners underpowered, the ignitors sometimes worked, sometimes didn't. It did last us all these years and with all the fancy electronic functions on the Samsung I doubt it will last nearly as long but in the mean time it's much better to cook on.

    Re stable oven temps. When I started smoking I got a smoker and meat probe that transmits to a secondary unit so I could keep an eye on the temp of the smoker. I finish my briskets in the oven wrapped in foil. The oven temp probe tells me that the temp variation in the oven (electric oven Thermador) is surprisingly wide, much wider than the smoker temp variation I obsess over.

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    The oven temp probe tells me that the temp variation in the oven (electric oven Thermador) is surprisingly wide, much wider than the smoker temp variation I obsess over.
    A big baking stone or some fireplace brick on the bottom rack can help with this. Adds some extra thermal mass.

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    Who was the one moaning about always-on heat?
    I could swear someone here was doing that...
    <raises hand> yeah but for the record that was for an uninsulated stove where a piezo would work just as well without the heat factor. aga's are heavily insulated but they do still give off heat no doubt. But they're so cool (and so expensive) that it would be worth it (and if you can afford one you can afford the ac bill).

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    <raises hand> yeah but for the record that was for an uninsulated stove, aga's are heavily insulated but they do still give off heat no doubt. But they're so cool (and so expensive) that it would be worth it (and if you can afford one you can afford the ac bill).
    just poking at you

    (i was tempted to mention them too, but they're so out of range of this discussion: expense/type/cooking style)

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