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  1. #1
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    Fat bike questions....

    Ok, yeah, fat bikes. There's probably plenty to chirp at there, but I have questions.

    There's a Motobecane fatty on my local craigslist, in my size. I don't know much about motobecane, is the quality decent?

    https://wenatchee.craigslist.org/bik...996331458.html

    The idea here is to make it e-fat and use it for a spring access tool. We've got lots of approaches that melt out haphazardly, brutal on snowmobiles, takes forever walking, and regular mt bikes flail once you hit sloppy snow.
    Anybody do this?
    How are they on variable, possibly hot snow?
    More hassle than it's worth?
    This post is probably more about filling my time in the last few weeks of waiting for proper winter, but indulge me if you like....



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  2. #2
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    Motobecane is just meh, nothing special but should be ok for your purpose. I've seen a couple set up with hub motors and one with that Bafang(?) BB mounted mid drive that's being used for trail work. There isn't much that's good on hot or corroding snow especially if it was groomed it's just going to collapse when you touch it. I do think that a purpose built fat-e would be better but certainly pricier and there are even fat-e cargo bikes that would be great for your needs but they ain't cheap.

  3. #3
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    I broke my first motobecane frame, the sturgis, on the rear chainstay, but I am a beefcake and was riding it on rough trails in Moab.. so a bit different than fs road access. They do have a 6 year warranty on the aluminum frames and replaced it.

    The one in that link doesn't look all that great, the benefit of getting a motobecane imo is you get some nice components for a good price, but you gotta throw down a little coin to get those models, the El cheapo builds aint that great. I'd definitely look for one with mulefat rims that you can run tubeless, you can literally save 3-4 lbs per wheel. Those tires are bunk as well, so you would need to spend ~180 for a new set. Also one with XT components shouldn't be too hard to find. I'd pass unless they take a low ball but those budget fatties aren't that much fun to ride so unless you really only want it for access, I'd look elsewhere
    ...tricks deserve applause, style deserves respect

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by riff View Post

    How are they on variable, possibly hot snow?
    More hassle than it's worth?
    This post is probably more about filling my time in the last few weeks of waiting for proper winter, but indulge me if you like....



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    they are no magic bullet, You are still using wheels on snow, but most times they do really well. If the snow is frozen or at least still frozen down into the snow or there is some consolidation underneath... they do awesome i/e road or machine groomed trail. Riding 'off trail' you really need to be aware of the crust you are riding on.. usually doesnt work except for early morning late spring. Riding the biggest volume tires you can find can help with float but usually those tires have shit for traction, I've found my preference to be running a 'smaller' tire like the fatty minions that have knobs you can trust
    ...tricks deserve applause, style deserves respect

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by riff View Post
    There's a Motobecane fatty on my local craigslist, in my size. I don't know much about motobecane, is the quality decent? ]
    speaking to quality

    I would call trek or giant an A-list brand

    Motobecane probably C-list

    which is why they are cheap
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    For just cruising the snow, you don’t need more than the Moto. If you’re doing significant trail riding or bike packing with it, a nicer model would likely serve you better. But really they’re all heavy and slow and sluggish, it’s just shades of grey.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon3 View Post
    ....heavy and slow and sluggish...
    What are three words that describe my riding style, alex?

    Mines actually lighter than my trail/park bike. Normally if you get this feeling, you are riding the wrong terrain. They are most fun in places no other bike could go
    ...tricks deserve applause, style deserves respect

  8. #8
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    You can get a fatbike with carbon frame/carbon rims/ 1 x drive train and then they arent so heavy, i've seen them climb some amazing shit but you would be talking > 7 K
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by rip View Post
    What are three words that describe my riding style, alex?

    Mines actually lighter than my trail/park bike. Normally if you get this feeling, you are riding the wrong terrain. They are most fun in places no other bike could go
    Yeah my comment should have said they’re all heavy slow and sluggish unless you spend a fair bit, and even then my fun meter hasn’t pegged much higher than on my $500 motobecane. You’re not going to get quick handling and acceleration on 4”+ tires regardless of rims and frame. It really depends on what you are trying to do with it. Snomo and XC ski trails? Cheap fatty is fine. Something more gnar? Might upgrade. I mostly use the fatty to stay active when the snow sucks and stay in reasonable bike shape for summer, and the cheap bike is all I need. Upgrading would be a waste of money for me (and id argue most people that end up buying fat bikes).

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    As others have said that "deal" isn't much of a deal given Motobecane's already low, low prices...

    I picked up a 2nd fat bike (Boris X5, i.e. lower tier components) for my 13 yo from their scratch and dent website for $450 shipped.

    https://www.bikeisland.com vs http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/fat-bikes.htm

    It was marked as scratched and scuffed, but apparently the fork was fuxored as they included a replacement fork so I need to swap parts and haven't put any time on it yet.

    I suspect it won't ride as nice as my (older) Norco but that's not the goal here...

  11. #11
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    Groovy, probably pass then and keep life simple.

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  12. #12
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    Fat bike questions....

    Look up Bikes Direct for a new cost.
    I ride my mid fatty all winter.
    Great on groomed tracks, snowmobile trail and closed roads.
    Like Indy Pass and the Bells.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    MB HALe.

  13. #13
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    py snow is crappy snow and no fat bike is gonna change it.

    If you want an emtb get one that is designed to be so.

    A Surly Wed or Ice Cream truck would fit nice. There are others as well.
    watch out for snakes

  14. #14
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    Aug 2008
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    Central VT
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    Nothing wrong a Bikes Direct fat bike. I bought a steel Motobecane Lurch a couple seasons ago for about $1k - hard to beat the build kit (full GX, Bluto, Race Face bits, Maxxis tires, etc.) for that kind of money. Its heavy but the fit and finish is impressive for the price. I don't think Bikes Direct is the place to get a daily driver trail bike but for a bike I slog through the snow for a few hundred miles a year, its perfect.

  15. #15
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    Fat bike questions....

    ^that sounds like a great deal.

    I bought a Rocky Mountain Blizzard 10 for $700 new last spring. Cheap parts, heavy as fuck but it rides nice with modern geo etc. itís mostly a beach bike for me, so I didnít want anything too nice. threw a cheap half broken dropper on it I got for a charitable donation. 4.8íí minions ought to be interesting on snow. Great bike to have around to loan out to friends.

  16. #16
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    I bought a well used Salsa Mukluk off CL for $700, threw a Bafang BBSHD on it and it rips. You will need spacers. I plan on doing the same with snow-covered roads this winter and maybe a few commutes to work. We will see. If you have any questions about the ebike conversion let me know.

    OP, where are you located?

  17. #17
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    Jan 2016
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    Another Motobecane owner here, I have the Boris. In the case of the Boris the frames (IIRC) are sourced from the same manufacturer that builds KHS 4 season frames in China. I'm a heavy rider and nave not had any issues with the frame. Put a carbon fork on it and it's a pretty fun cheap bike.

  18. #18
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    Can't tell from the pictures however that Moto in the CL listing appears to have old standard 9mm QR wheels, that would be a hard pass for me.
    You want a through axle system, especially if you are going to "e" it.

    As mentioned above, get something that has wheels that are TL or can be converted, the weight savings is significant.

    Snow condition and tires.
    Snow up where I live (PNW) is generally wet and heavy, places where it gets packed down become really hard and slippery when the temps drop back off, I've have had to roll studded tires to keep from having the carpet being yanked out from under me. The fat gets used the most during seasons where we have below normal temps that allow for trail grooming to set up firm.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ULLRismyco-pilot View Post
    I bought a well used Salsa Mukluk off CL for $700, threw a Bafang BBSHD on it and it rips. You will need spacers. I plan on doing the same with snow-covered roads this winter and maybe a few commutes to work. We will see. If you have any questions about the ebike conversion let me know.

    OP, where are you located?
    ULLRis, I'm in the central cascades, so the icicle, white river, little wenatchee, and chiwawa river are all tricky access in the spring.

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  20. #20
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    Lots of good info here, I'm glad to see folks are doing this. I'll keep an eye out locally for a through axle specimen

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  21. #21
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    Good chance youll find one of these during the black friday sale for 22-2300usd . 2.8" tires but nothing to put a rigid fat fork w a 4.0 tire for winter

    https://www.commencalcanada.com/Mobi...0b-c2x26747395

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