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  1. #1
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    Wheels that don't suck on non-dentist salary

    So the E13 wheels that came on my bike are apparently made out of Play-Doh. More issues with those things in one season than in the past 20 years of riding combined. Any suggestion for something durable and somewhat affordable? I'm guessing that means I'm gonna have to go with heavy, guess that will make me stronger. 29, boost, xd, enduro type riding, mostly earning my descents, 210 lbs, lotta rock around here, I'm not exactly a finesse kinda rider. Also not too keen on stuffing pool noodles or other stuff besides Stan's sealant in there.
    Hoping to score an end of season deal, seen some ok prices on Stan's and Crank Bros, not sure what else I should be looking at. Could go with a DH wheelset if it's not overkill. Am I crazy to even consider budget no-name carbon, even with a warranty? Kinda like the idea of my wheels staying round, but obviously don't want to risk having them disintegrate.
    “I really lack the words to compliment myself today.” - Alberto Tomba

  2. #2
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    Is there anything wrong with the hubs on your E13 wheels? Maybe just relace those wheels with a nice rim.

  3. #3
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    The I9 S series wheels seem pretty hard to beat right now. $750 for a set with 101 hubs, $975 with Hydra hubs.
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    All ye punterz! Leave thine stupid heavy skis in the past, or at least in the resort category, for the age of lightweight pussy sticks is upon us! Behold! Keep up with the randocommandos on their carbon blades of shortness! Break thine tibias into spiral splinters with pintech extravagance!

  4. #4
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    Been riding light bikes carbon wheels for about 4 years now. No problems, their new asymmetric AM wheels have been really good. They have Hope hubs which are fucking loud but other than that totally satisfied. I ride primarily in the Bay Area and Tahoe. I am 6'2" and 225 lbs and ride about 30-60 dirt miles a week, April to November.

  5. #5
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    Wheels that don't suck on non-dentist salary

    In addition to toast’s question about the hubs -

    How wide of tires are you typically running?
    What’s your budget?

    I wouldn’t be afraid of carbon on SLT glaciated/worn granite rolls and stuff, more concerned in areas with loose flying rocks that can come back around and impact the inner side of the rim. Like Xmas valley but with even bigger sharper rocks getting kicked loose. Or just plain jagged stuff sticking out of the ground. You regularly riding anywhere like that?

    You can get heavier carbon layups suited for your weight no problem. It ends up the same or heavier than an Aluminum rim but with much better damping, vertical compliance, lateral stiffness than aluminum. The pint of carbon IMO isn’t weight savings, it’s the feel and response of the wheel, and also generally more durable than aluminum, save for my two types of concerns listed above. Don’t leave the rims outside in the sun, acid rain, or snow and they won’t disintegrate on you.
    _______________________________________________
    "Strapping myself to a sitski built with 30lb of metal and fibreglass then trying to water ski in it sounds like a stupid idea to me.

    I'll be there."
    ... Andy Campbell

  6. #6
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    Also, see Seth’s post on the I9 Backcountry 360. If you run 2.6 front back I don’t know if you can get a better wheelset for the money. 36mm IW should give you pretty decent midsummer grip if you are on 2.6’s.
    _______________________________________________
    "Strapping myself to a sitski built with 30lb of metal and fibreglass then trying to water ski in it sounds like a stupid idea to me.

    I'll be there."
    ... Andy Campbell

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redsmurfer View Post
    Been riding light bikes carbon wheels for about 4 years now. No problems, their new asymmetric AM wheels have been really good. They have Hope hubs which are fucking loud but other than that totally satisfied. I ride primarily in the Bay Area and Tahoe. I am 6'2" and 225 lbs and ride about 30-60 dirt miles a week, April to November.
    What did these cost ya? I emailed Light Bike for a quote for the same build and haven't head back yet. Did they take months to get?

    If the OP wants to go budget - Colorado Cyclist and Pro Wheel Builder will lace up Hope hubs to a nice alloy rim, taped with valves shipped to you for under $600.

    I got a set of Hope hubs with Race Face Arc rims for $550 shipped a couple seasons ago. Still rolling perfectly after 2 seasons of use.

  8. #8
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    Can't remember exactly the cost but was around $850 without shipping, the first set was in the $700's I believe. I have had only good customer relations with them so far, their spelling sucks in emails but hey what do you expect. Maybe chock this up to another small way Trump has fucked us all.

  9. #9
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    Wheels that don't suck on non-dentist salary

    He asks for non-dentist wheels and you fuckers recommend i9 and carbon? Jesus.

    At least you guys could recommend the sweet USED i9 wheelset poster right now on this forum.
    FS: Industry Nine Backcountry 360 - $700 shipped obo https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...d.php?t=330211

    Troll EBay for something like a DT Swiss M1700. Can sometimes find for about $400.

    Or, like Toast said, repurpose the hubs if they’re holding up. DT Swiss EX 471, Stan’s Flow, Spank Spike Race 33. Budget $300 for rims, spokes & labor.
    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Last edited by jm2e; 10-16-2019 at 01:25 PM.
    If you want me to take a dump in a box and mark it tubeless, I will. I got spare time.

  10. #10
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    Wheels that don't suck on non-dentist salary

    Hey, if you get the non-dentist carbon rim with the correct layup, cross section profile, and decent hubs, and it works for your terrain (no jagged and/or flying rocks) that might actually be less costly over the long haul than constantly relacing soft Al rims that flat-out or require rebending so often that you can’t get a good deal.
    _______________________________________________
    "Strapping myself to a sitski built with 30lb of metal and fibreglass then trying to water ski in it sounds like a stupid idea to me.

    I'll be there."
    ... Andy Campbell

  11. #11
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    EX 511 rear, XM 481 front. Or 511s front and back if you ding your front rim a lot. 350s or your current hubs if you like them and don't think you'll be able to sell your current wheelset.

    Buy parts, borrow a jig and build them yourself, seriously it's not hard. Built mine for €400 total and would do the same again.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SchralphMacchio View Post
    Hey, if you get the non-dentist carbon rim with the correct layup, cross section profile, and decent hubs, and it works for your terrain (no jagged and/or flying rocks) that might actually be less costly over the long haul than constantly relacing soft Al rims that flat-out or require rebending so often that you can’t get a good deal.
    The big "IF" is if you read the OP comment on 210 lbs, rocky, and rides like a hack.

    So yeah, aluminum rims from Dtswiss, Mavic, Stans etc plus some straight gauge spokes would apply. If you whack them you can bend back bead edge. If you taco them you replace with another cheap rim and tension. I'm on that program and it is most cost effective for us hack enduro racers.

  13. #13
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    Hubs are ok, I've never built a wheel, but figure it can't be too hard to lace it myself and bring it into a shop to make sure it's properly tensioned. Schralph, I mostly ride North Tahoe/Truckee/Dville, so ain't nothing smooth here, and I'm a smasher. Run 2.35-2.5, so looking for something around 30mm. Also, not sure I'll be able to get another ride out of my rim, and probably only have another 4-6 weeks of riding, so looking for something that can get here fast. Will look into some of the above suggestions.
    “I really lack the words to compliment myself today.” - Alberto Tomba

  14. #14
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    non-dentist budget is a (ahem) broad range.
    We Are One has their amazeballs Agent rim in the Movement wheels laced to I9 hubs for $999. With lifetime no questions smash the hell out of them replacement warranty. I bought for the warranty peace of mind. I've been on Agent rims all this yearand I've not even re-tensioned them yet. 10/10.

    I also have Light Bicycle AM rims with hd layup. Bombproof for a few years now. I'd buy again in a heartbeat.

    Neither option are 'cheap' but worth the cost, IMO.

    edit: see here - https://www.weareonecomposites.com/s...t-wheelset-518

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmmm...pow! View Post
    Hubs are ok, I've never built a wheel, but figure it can't be too hard to lace it myself and bring it into a shop to make sure it's properly tensioned.
    Maybe not a great time for a project experiment if you're trying to eek out last bit of the season! See if your shop has time for a quick re-lace build before ordering new rims! Also check to see if they have plenty of spokes and nipples in stock in case any of yours are no bueno and/or your new rim profile has a symmetric or asymetric, or significantly lower height profile different from the current rims (I don't know shit about e13 rims).

    Quote Originally Posted by mmmm...pow! View Post
    .
    North Tahoe/Truckee/Dville, so ain't nothing smooth here, and I'm a smasher. Run 2.35-2.5, so looking for something around 30mm.
    Yeah I couldn't remember north or south. Definitely way more chunder on the norf side of the lake. See my above thoughts re: plastic vs Al. rims. I'm light enough I could run plastic at Dville's outerlying trails but I don't think I'd recommend it for a Clyde, lots of loose crap on Pauley and lots of "sticking out angled right at you" shit on other trails that might crack a carbon rim with an improperly pressured/placed tire in that area.
    _______________________________________________
    "Strapping myself to a sitski built with 30lb of metal and fibreglass then trying to water ski in it sounds like a stupid idea to me.

    I'll be there."
    ... Andy Campbell

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by LC View Post
    Buy parts, borrow a jig and build them yourself, seriously it's not hard. Built mine for €400 total and would do the same again.
    This. 210 lbs + rocky trails + lack of finesse = buy a truing stand and a tensionmeter. Building wheels isn't rocket science. Once you've done a couple, you can bang them out in 45 minutes or so. Assuming your hubs are good, you'll invest ~$100 on spokes (for 2 wheels), and another ~$100 per rim (for a nice aluminum). Once you have the truing stand and tensionmeter, you can throw a fresh rim on (reusing spokes) in less than a half hour, for the price of the rim.

    All of that applies to carbon rims too - the rims just cost more. But carbon wheels are even easier to build, so the process is a bit quicker.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrenalated View Post
    The I9 S series wheels seem pretty hard to beat right now. $750 for a set with 101 hubs, $975 with Hydra hubs.
    Noodles

    And I'm an i9 fan generally speaking



    Rather than look for something specific, I'd just look for used wheels. There is no one right answer. I live where you do. I've become a fan of aluminum rims.
    Besides the comet that killed the dinosaurs nothing has destroyed a species faster than entitled white people.-ajp

  18. #18
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    How are you damaging the rim?

    Assuming you are just nocking them out of true at 210 pounds for a 30mm inner rim the DT EX511's are the best alloy rim available. You may be able to get away with a 481 in the front if you are worried about weight but it weighs less for a reason. The second Best option would be DT's cheaper rim the E532.

    If its dents they you either need to get beefier tires or deal with pool noodles. Try some Double Down Maxxis tires.

    Don't get shitty hubs.
    a positive attitude will not solve all of your problems, but it may annoy enough people to make it worth the effort

    Formerly Rludes025

  19. #19
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    I have 3 bikes that I ride back to back all the time. One with expensive Carbon rims, one with Stan's Al, and my road bike has Rol Race SL, (Al). Also I switched from Stan's Al to Carbon on that one mountain bike so I remember the difference. I think the hubs matter the most, then followed by feel and weight issues, but no matter what, I like Sapim Bladed CX spokes. If the rim weights are similar, they ride different, not necessarily better. I think the OP should find some used wheels as others have suggested, or build some up. I did a set, and I liked the experience.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  20. #20
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    Definitely following this thread. The DB Blanchard wheels on the wife's bike could definitely stand to be upgraded. She'd appreciate losing 1-2 lbs of rotating weight muy mucho.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    This. 210 lbs + rocky trails + lack of finesse = buy a truing stand and a tensionmeter. Building wheels isn't rocket science. Once you've done a couple, you can bang them out in 45 minutes or so. Assuming your hubs are good, you'll invest ~$100 on spokes (for 2 wheels), and another ~$100 per rim (for a nice aluminum). Once you have the truing stand and tensionmeter, you can throw a fresh rim on (reusing spokes) in less than a half hour, for the price of the rim.

    All of that applies to carbon rims too - the rims just cost more. But carbon wheels are even easier to build, so the process is a bit quicker.
    First, I agree with all of this. Second, what kind of rims are on your E13 wheels - what model do you have? Sometimes factory wheels are just tensioned for shit and need to be loosened up and rebuilt - after which they are stronger and stiffer. You could also look at using beefier spokes and reusing the same rims. Do the current wheels have aluminum nipples? If so you could move to brass.

    I like toast's suggestion of just rebuilding the wheels, maybe using new rims.

    If you do, buy Jobst Brandt's book on wheelbuilding. Excellent. I don't use a tensionometer, but that is certainly a good idea.

  22. #22
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    Wheels that don't suck on non-dentist salary

    1. Take the wheels to your LBS and ask them to buy rims/spokes/nipples and rebuild them for you. You’ll still come out of it for <$400
    2. Find a good deal on rims and buy them, then trust the manufacturers ERD and buy spokes from DansComp or BikeHubStore. Take to LBS and ask them to build up for you. Save a few bucks vs #1
    3. Buy Roger Musson's eBook for $12 https://www.wheelpro.co.uk/wheelbuilding/book.php build a stand out of scraps and hardware store parts for $30, and get a tension meter for $70. Buy rims and spokes as in #2 (or wait to get the rims, then figure out ERD on your own, as Musson suggests). Same price as #1, but you invest in yourself. Budget 5-10 hours your first time. Improvement with each wheel.
    4. Better yet, borrow a truing stand and tension meter and follow #3. Shave some time off #3. A nice stand really is time efficient. Though a tension meter can make an OCD person waaaay more obsessive.
    Note: don't try lacing a new rim with the old spokes unles it's the exact same model of rim. The ERD will almost guaranteed be different and you'll just be wasting time.
    Note: I doubt the LBS will want you to try lacing it up first and then asking them to finish the job. Lacing is the quick/easy part of wheelbuilding. LBS will cringe when you give it to them saying you figured it'd "help" while they wonder if you fucked up the lacing, picking the spoke lengths or added threadlock. And they'll cringe again when you ask for a discount on wheelbuilding because you already did "most of the work"
    Note: Seriously, Musson's book should be called "The Idiot's Guide To Wheelbuilding"! He debunks the old idea that wheelbuilding is an art. Get the lacing right, get the dish right, don't let the spokes wind up, and balance spoke tension. Bob's Your Uncle. Nothing in home wrenching will leave you feeling so accomplished. It's addictive.
    If you want me to take a dump in a box and mark it tubeless, I will. I got spare time.

  23. #23
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    Realiable and affordable = DT Swiss. XM481 or EX511

    Hope hubs or DT Swiss 350

    I just had an XM481 built by Colorado Cyclist and they were quick and easy to deal with.

    I went the chinese carbon route a couple years ago and broke my rear rim. Went back to aluminum and really don't notice much difference.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by funkendrenchman View Post
    R
    I went the chinese carbon route a couple years ago and broke my rear rim. Went back to aluminum and really don't notice much difference.
    From mine and my friends experiences: You fix carbon rims/wheels when you have to. You fix alloy rims/wheels when you decide to or finally get around to it. Carbon breaks, alloy bends.
    I've got a buddy who absolutely hammers on gear and got a set of those e13 wheels on his YT DH bike. By the end of the season the rear rim looked like fusilli pasta, but he used the OG ghetto tubeless technique of a split 24" tube and it held for the last month of riding. Even broke 2 spokes the last weekend, but the thing kept turning and the tire kept rolling. We'll replace the rim sometime this winter when it's convenient.
    If you want me to take a dump in a box and mark it tubeless, I will. I got spare time.

  25. #25
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    Again defining budget would help here.

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