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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    On a genuine ol' fashioned authentic steam powered aereoplane
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    12,380

    Heated hydration systems?

    I'm sure this isn't a new topic, but I can't find shit when using the forum search function.

    Not too worried about lift served skiing, but hunting season and BC skiing = frozen hydration tubes.

    A really easy fix would be wire/element wrap with tape + some sort of battery pack. Like a mini version of those kits to keep house pipes from freezing.

    https://www.arcticinnovations.com/

    Seems pricey. Gotta be a DIY out there.

    Neoprene covers and "blow back" has not worked for me.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Agrestic
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    4,840
    Water bottles.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    3,945
    Hand warmers

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    5,118
    Wear it under your coat


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
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    Mid-tomahawk
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    152
    Quote Originally Posted by concretejungle View Post
    Water bottles.
    Yeah, that. Just not worth fucking with hoses when it's proper cold out.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Methow Valley
    Posts
    796
    Add alcohol? Or bottles/platypus. I've gotten soft and now bring a thermos bc skiing and hunting. I think I'm officially an old fuck?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    On a genuine ol' fashioned authentic steam powered aereoplane
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    Yeah, bottles are probably the best way to go. I just hate taking off a big pack multiple times when hiking to get to a bottle. Hydration bladders have really changed the way I drink water. Little sip every 10-15 minutes vs stopping every 60-90 and taking a big chug from a nalgene or something.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    flatland
    Posts
    2,870
    I wear something like this from Camelbak instead of a back protector. Neoprene'd the delivery tube and its zipped inside the shoulder strap - under the jacket of course. I can take just the water bag and the insulated feeder tube and drop it in my pack.

    DIY? A battery on the chest side and a piece of wire looped back to the bat. Maybe a AA or C with exposed copper wire and a reliable way to connect the positive end of the bat when needed. Stripped on the way out and coated on the way back so it doesn't short?

    moosejaw.com - TETON Sports Trailrunner 2.0 Hydration Pack - 25$

    "knowledgeable in escapades of the flesh"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Western MT
    Posts
    1,378
    Some good suggestions. Bottles are just easier to deal with in freezing conditions and you can get an insulative jacket for pretty cheap (throw some heat packs in if super cold) or keep it an inside jacket pocket like mentioned, but the bulk/location bothers me with that method. And the thermos idea is good, just heavier. Heat liquid of choice and throw it in the pack, pretty reliable choice and simple (old guys are smart that way). Usually not a lot of volume that way unless you really add weight. Drink a lot of water before you leave and carry a method of melting snow for emergencies (metal cup and some matches/firestarter). You can also coil the hose inside the pack with a bladder and keep it against your back. If you are working hard and not wearing a thick insulative top that can work really well unless it gets really cold. But then you are still fiddling with your pack which kind of defeats the purpose. The big advantage of bladders of course is that you can haul a lot of water relatively comfortably since it conforms to your pack. And it's usually much quieter if you're hunting. If I'm drinking that much water though I figure I'm pissing so often that everything within 1/2 mile knows where I am ha ha.

    You would be surprised how it's not that big of a deal regarding the frequent sips once you get used to it. I went through the same process of thinking so I get it. Just gulp a bunch at the start of your endeavor from a bottle that stays in the vehicle. I also remember when I was young and nobody used a hydration bladder and didn't think much of it. We did have bota bags though.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    On a genuine ol' fashioned authentic steam powered aereoplane
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    12,380
    Quote Originally Posted by 3PinGrin View Post
    Some good suggestions. Bottles are just easier to deal with in freezing conditions and you can get an insulative jacket for pretty cheap (throw some heat packs in if super cold) or keep it an inside jacket pocket like mentioned, but the bulk/location bothers me with that method. And the thermos idea is good, just heavier. Heat liquid of choice and throw it in the pack, pretty reliable choice and simple (old guys are smart that way). Usually not a lot of volume that way unless you really add weight. Drink a lot of water before you leave and carry a method of melting snow for emergencies (metal cup and some matches/firestarter). You can also coil the hose inside the pack with a bladder and keep it against your back. If you are working hard and not wearing a thick insulative top that can work really well unless it gets really cold. But then you are still fiddling with your pack which kind of defeats the purpose. The big advantage of bladders of course is that you can haul a lot of water relatively comfortably since it conforms to your pack. And it's usually much quieter if you're hunting. If I'm drinking that much water though I figure I'm pissing so often that everything within 1/2 mile knows where I am ha ha.

    You would be surprised how it's not that big of a deal regarding the frequent sips once you get used to it. I went through the same process of thinking so I get it. Just gulp a bunch at the start of your endeavor from a bottle that stays in the vehicle. I also remember when I was young and nobody used a hydration bladder and didn't think much of it. We did have bota bags though.
    Yeah, I bet proper pre hydration + naglene/themos in the pack would work. In the pre-camelback days I guess we were just more thirsty but we survived just fine.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Western MT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteroom_Guardian View Post
    Yeah, I bet proper pre hydration + naglene/themos in the pack would work. In the pre-camelback days I guess we were just more thirsty but we survived just fine.
    I read a book about the crusades once where I had an enlightened moment. I can't remember the name of the book, I wish I could, but it was mostly about the battles themselves and discussed the great thirst encountered while fighting with swords while you are bleeding from enemy inflicted wounds all the while wearing heavy armor. And with no water immediately available to boot. I never really thought about how thirsty that would make you, and thought "I'm such a pussy!!". haha

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    5,118
    Have you considered drinking your own urine?


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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    84
    Wtf? Boil some snow.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    84
    Quote Originally Posted by AK47bp View Post
    Have you considered drinking your own urine?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Truthfully, that was my first thought.

  15. #15
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    Aug 2013
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    Western MT
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    Quote Originally Posted by GarySanchez View Post
    Wtf? Boil some snow.
    How exactly does one boil snow in the backcountry?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    84
    Is that a serious question? You apply heat to snow and it melts down into water. Get yourself a tiny stove and a tiny pot. It all fits inside itself and takes up hardly any space. I only use a 30L.

    I enjoy a nice cup of hot green tea every time I go out. Made some nice potatoes the other day in the BC. Bombay spice. Real good. Took ehhhhhhhhhhh 7 mins. Try. I don't even understand not taking pots with. Who does that? I mean really hahaha, you can make hot chocolate.

    Fuck...

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Western MT
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    Quote Originally Posted by GarySanchez View Post
    Is that a serious question? You apply heat to snow and it melts down into water. Get yourself a tiny stove and a tiny pot. It all fits inside itself and takes up hardly any space. I only use a 30L.

    I enjoy a nice cup of hot green tea every time I go out. Made some nice potatoes the other day in the BC. Bombay spice. Real good. Took ehhhhhhhhhhh 7 mins. Try. I don't even understand not taking pots with. Who does that? I mean really hahaha, you can make hot chocolate.

    Fuck...
    that's not sublimation

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    flatland
    Posts
    2,870
    Maybe skip the back protection and go with a water bottle and some chainmail.
    "knowledgeable in escapades of the flesh"

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    84
    Quote Originally Posted by 3PinGrin View Post
    that's not sublimation
    Perhaps not, but is it annoying? I see annoying right now.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,957
    Carry a bladder or two wrapped up in your hunting pack and a small bottle or two inside your vest. Replenish when the little bottles are empty.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    3,945
    Quote Originally Posted by Gepeto View Post
    Maybe skip the back protection and go with a water bottle and some chainmail.
    That would have been righteous if you shopped a camelback in there.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    NIseko Japan, or Gold Coast Australia
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    130
    just gotta remember to blow air back into the pipe after you take a drink.

    my backpacks water pouch sits up against my back, so it doesn't get cold even on real cold -20c/-5f days, but the pipe freezes real fast if its not all air.
    usually you get a bunch of ice chunks next time you drink, but thats just free bonus brain-freeze.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    South Central
    Posts
    482
    Quote Originally Posted by anything View Post
    just gotta remember to blow air back into the pipe after you take a drink.

    my backpacks water pouch sits up against my back, so it doesn't get cold even on real cold -20c/-5f days, but the pipe freezes real fast if its not all air.
    usually you get a bunch of ice chunks next time you drink, but thats just free bonus brain-freeze.
    This ^^^

    If itís really cold or gets frozen despite this effort Iíll route the hose from outside jacket over shoulder to putting it straight down my back inside collar. In quite short order it is melted out from heat.

    Rinse and repeat as needed.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    The Bull City
    Posts
    4,686
    Vodka
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
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    18,456
    Quote Originally Posted by AK47bp View Post
    Have you considered drinking your own urine?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    this ^^ came up during casual conversation in the desert at Moab

    It might have been the chiropracter who pointed out that urine is very quickly toxic

    and then the bike mechanic pointed out you would have to take it rectally

    the desert does funny things to people
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

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