Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 37 of 37

Thread: Outback brakes

  1. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    4,684
    Read an article rerecently that said most rotors that are diagnosed as warped are not... but instead just have uneven deposits of brake pad material.

    Most cars in Murica are automatics now, so brakes have to be held at every stop. If the pads are hot enough, they'll leave a little bit of material on the rotors which can get glazed on with subsequent use.
    PE, Mechanical Engineering
    University of Bridger Bowl Alumnus
    Alpental Creeper

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    YetiMan
    Posts
    10,893

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,445
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    Read an article rerecently that said most rotors that are diagnosed as warped are not... but instead just have uneven deposits of brake pad material.

    Most cars in Murica are automatics now, so brakes have to be held at every stop. If the pads are hot enough, they'll leave a little bit of material on the rotors which can get glazed on with subsequent use.
    It's weird my A4 rear disks have the pad lines impregnated in them. I think it's from parking it for over a month with the handbrake pulled. No vibrations though. The brakes also last much much longer. They see hard mountain descents and BC wet roads. 10+ years old audi FTW.

    I am waiting for Raybestos Element3 disks and pads. Those were the only somewhat semi-metallic pads I found. No true semi metallic pads for the outback. I really hate how these days most cars only have ceramic.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    The Bull City
    Posts
    4,526
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    Read an article rerecently that said most rotors that are diagnosed as warped are not... but instead just have uneven deposits of brake pad material.

    Most cars in Murica are automatics now, so brakes have to be held at every stop. If the pads are hot enough, they'll leave a little bit of material on the rotors which can get glazed on with subsequent use.
    Well, that would be resolved when the rotors are turned right? Went through two cycles of that, two full brake jobs where I was billed for turning the rotors but the shimmy wasn't resolved until the rear rotors were replaced.
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    3,901
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    Most cars in Murica are automatics now, so brakes have to be held at every stop. If the pads are hot enough, they'll leave a little bit of material on the rotors which can get glazed on with subsequent use.
    I might left the brake off a bit early anticipating a green on a flat, or even letting a little roll happen if slight downhill to assist with acceleration. But for the most part, brake is applied at all stops while sitting there waiting fiddling with radio looking out window etc in every manual vehicle I’ve owned.

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,445
    Unfortunately turning rotors costs as much as a new one here.

    Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Moose, Iowa
    Posts
    5,893
    Quote Originally Posted by daught View Post
    Unfortunately turning rotors costs as much as a new one here.

    Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
    Buy the rotor from Rock Auto or Amazon. Don't get the cheapest available. I like the ones that are coated in by the hub. You will save big on rotors over the local parts store. Lube the pins and change the pads on both sides, make sure you put new slider brackets in that come with the pads. I like the ceramic/metallic hybrid pads myself. Quiet, less dust, and still good braking power but more $$$ for sure. Should be good to go unless by some chance the caliper is siezed up - which would be rare for such a new car - you should be able to tell once you have it apart - the puck should push back in smoothly and easily and make sure the puck boot is in good shape. All this stuff sits on the back of the car and gets hammered by salt. Definitely seems early to have problems though. I just replaced the pads for the first time on the back of our Prius at 150 ish k. Pins were still moving but definitely low on lube.

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,445
    I installed the new brakes and disks. I ended up picking the Raybestos "element3" series. The Akenono ProACT, also have good reviews but the Raybestos have a higher friction coefficient of GG vs FF(stock, akebono, and all other aftermarket pads). Supposedly the Akebono last longer but the Raybestos have very excellent bite and modulation. I am very impressed with the new brakes on the outback.

    Here are the part numbers for the disks and pads for the 5th gen outback
    RAYBESTOS EHT1078H
    RAYBESTOS EHT1808
    RAYBESTOS 980377FZN
    RAYBESTOS 981956FZN

    Here is the break in procedure
    http://www.raysbestbrakes.com/raybes...ation_tips.php

    And the subaru service manual
    http://www.mediafire.com/file/tt1iwu...%2529.zip/file


    So there was nothing wrong with the calipers. Nothing seized or rusty. It's a bit hard to explain why it needed new disks, almost as hard as explaining why an awd wheels spin freely on the back.

    I can see thy it is is very important to lube the sliders often. The rear sliders are exposed with the elements, they don't have a protective boot. I will order a few spares to keep on hand.



    The old disks had a lot of pad material deposited on them. Probably that was the cause of the vibrations. The pads are being used up so it's not like deposits bed in and they don't get cleared.




  9. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    YetiMan
    Posts
    10,893
    Quote Originally Posted by daught View Post
    almost as hard as explaining why an awd wheels spin freely on the back]
    https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...ans?highlight=

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Not Enough Sun and Too Many People
    Posts
    4,759
    Quote Originally Posted by Rideski View Post
    I might left the brake off a bit early anticipating a green on a flat, or even letting a little roll happen if slight downhill to assist with acceleration. But for the most part, brake is applied at all stops while sitting there waiting fiddling with radio looking out window etc in every manual vehicle I’ve owned.
    The difference is that with a manual, your foot is on the brake and the car is in neutral, or the clutch is fully depressed, so the brakes are only holding the car against gravity, if you're stopped on a hill. In an auto, you're still sending power to the drive wheels at a stop, and using the brakes to resist that force unless you shift into P or N at every stoplight.
    Set my compass North, I got Winter in my blood.

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    3,901
    Ok valid point probably accounts for minimal extra pressure but I think the computer stops sending torque when your foot is not in the gas, brake is on, and at dead stop. But either way, hot components touching at stops.

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,445
    Maybe it has to do with pad formulation and rotors, some are more prone to deposits. It's not like autos and hard driving are a new thing.

    Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •