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Thread: Ask the experts

  1. #6101
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Barron DeJong View Post
    I have Smith ‘Ignitor’ lenses, 36% VLT. Great for sunny days in and out of woods. On heavily overcast days something a bit lighter would be a better.

    For those with photochromic lenses, are they responding quickly enough if you’re in and out of the woods? Or if you we’re riding in the open and then the trail dives into the brush are you left struggling to see in the dark for a while?
    they are particularly bad in snow

    it might depend on how old the teech is on your pair but they take awhile to change, I left a pair on the window sill behind the bug screen and the cross hatch of the screen showed up on the lense so I thot WTF eh ?

    In what seemed like half a minute the pattern was gone and I realized what happened but the tinting DID change slow enough to notice

    you can try this ^^ yourself if you want
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  2. #6102
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    Fall/winter mtb here in the PNW = cheap clear safety glasses. I rode this week with my smith rose lenses at 48% light and it was too dark in many spots even on a sunny day.

  3. #6103
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    I'm not a fan of photochromic for biking due to the lag. Where you want it (going in and out of shadow / bright sun), it's never where you want it.

    I have both Oakley Prizm (on Flight Jackets) and Smith ChromaPop (on Squad goggles) lenses and like both. The contrast is quite noticeable. Prizm Trail is very high contrast (makes some colors look funky), works great in daylight to overcast, but too dark for dusk riding. Prizm Low Light is very minor contrast that's a bit too light for direct sun but also too much tint for night riding. Smith Everyday Rose feels similar to Prizm Trail, but maybe a touch less contrast (more natural colors), works well in all sorts of daylight conditions, and is of course too dark for dusk / night. Contrast Rose Flash (older tint) is lighter and less contrast than Everyday Rose, but still unsuitable for dusk / night.

    For night riding, I only wear clear lenses, and even they put a noticeable tint to everything. For dusk riding (where you don't need a light), Prizm Low Light works up until about half an hour before sunset, or if you go in a heavily shaded valley before then.

    If I had to pick just one plus a clear lens, I'd probably go with Smith Everyday Rose. It's just a little more natural coloring than the Oakley Prizm Trail, but still offers good contrast. That said, the Oakley lenses do seem to be pretty scratch resistant, but I think that glasses lenses in general tend to be a bit tougher than goggle lenses.

  4. #6104
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    Well I donít notice the darkness change, which is what I like. I did a back to back with the Prizm trail yesterday and I liked the Reactiv more. I could see more w/ the Reactiv, itís really that simple. I have clear for night fat bike snow riding, etc.
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  5. #6105
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    For Ghetto tubeless, I need a size smaller than the wheel, right?

    My kids' bikes (Woom Off 5) Came with non-tubeless, Schrader valve, 24" rims. I'm thinking my best is the ghetto-tubeless route as the tubeless ready Schwalbe tires fit fairly loosely.

  6. #6106
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    Quote Originally Posted by XtrPickels View Post
    For Ghetto tubeless, I need a size smaller than the wheel, right?

    My kids' bikes (Woom Off 5) Came with non-tubeless, Schrader valve, 24" rims. I'm thinking my best is the ghetto-tubeless route as the tubeless ready Schwalbe tires fit fairly loosely.
    You donít want to just build up layers of Gorilla tape until you have a snug fit?

  7. #6107
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    another vote for 2-3 wraps of gorilla tape.

    Quote Originally Posted by J. Barron DeJong View Post
    You donít want to just build up layers of Gorilla tape until you have a snug fit?

  8. #6108
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    Quote Originally Posted by XtrPickels View Post
    For Ghetto tubeless, I need a size smaller than the wheel, right?

    My kids' bikes (Woom Off 5) Came with non-tubeless, Schrader valve, 24" rims. I'm thinking my best is the ghetto-tubeless route as the tubeless ready Schwalbe tires fit fairly loosely.
    Post back on how this goes. My daughter is on a 20+ bike. I tried to set up tubeless but struggled with the loose fit of the tire also. Didn't think about ghetto with the smaller tube...

    Sent from my SM-N986U using Tapatalk

  9. #6109
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    I saw a video (that i cant find) where the guy did a basic ghetto tubless install but instead of cutting off the excess tube he contact cemented it to the outside of the tire sidewall. It made it burpproof.

  10. #6110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beaver View Post
    I saw a video (that i cant find) where the guy did a basic ghetto tubless install but instead of cutting off the excess tube he contact cemented it to the outside of the tire sidewall. It made it burpproof.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0R8uyY0Yytg

    I think Iíd only consider this as a last resort option if all else fails

  11. #6111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tailwind View Post
    another vote for 2-3 wraps of gorilla tape.
    2-3 wraps? I’ve used Gorilla Tape dozens of times for tubeless and never needed more than one layer.

  12. #6112
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    If the tire bead is loose, it's always gonna be loose. You can stack up tape or tubes to get it to seal, but the tire is still grabbing on to a relatively small piece of the rim. Unless you're running very high pressures, that tire is prone to blow off in a corner. Which I can assure you is usually unpleasant.

    To which the answer may be: kids don't weigh enough to rip a tire off in a corner. In which case, the kid probably doesn't really benefit from tubeless anyways.

  13. #6113
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    Quote Originally Posted by smmokan View Post
    2-3 wraps? Iíve used Gorilla Tape dozens of times for tubeless and never needed more than one layer.
    one wrap is enough to seal the rim. The extra wraps are to to take up extra space to help seal the tire bead against the rim bed.

    I think Toast is right that if the issue isnít just that the bead wonít seal, but that the tire is really easy to get on and off the rim, then tubeless probably isnít the best idea.

  14. #6114
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    thanks for the advice. I think I will check out the rockbros. I am not very good at holding on to sun glasses. Ready for a few more weeks of fall riding.
    off your knees Louie

  15. #6115
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    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    If the tire bead is loose, it's always gonna be loose. You can stack up tape or tubes to get it to seal, but the tire is still grabbing on to a relatively small piece of the rim. Unless you're running very high pressures, that tire is prone to blow off in a corner. Which I can assure you is usually unpleasant.

    To which the answer may be: kids don't weigh enough to rip a tire off in a corner. In which case, the kid probably doesn't really benefit from tubeless anyways.
    What if I need that checkbox to fulfill my RadDad card?
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  16. #6116
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    color me unimaginative, i wouldn't have even thot of going tubeless on a kids bike

    was the end user getting a lot of flats ?

    back in the day junior had a flat and I fixed it tubeless by stuffing the tire with grass & sod
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  17. #6117
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    Because the industry is annoying, I might need to try to fit a 1.8 tapered fork into a bike with a 56mm lower headset cup. Does a headset cup to do that exist? I assume it would need to be external, but I can live with that. Haven't been able to find one though.

  18. #6118
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    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    <snip>

    To which the answer may be: kids don't weigh enough to rip a tire off in a corner. In which case, the kid probably doesn't really benefit from tubeless anyways.
    This^^

    It's a waste of time...

  19. #6119
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    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    If the tire bead is loose, it's always gonna be loose. You can stack up tape or tubes to get it to seal, but the tire is still grabbing on to a relatively small piece of the rim. Unless you're running very high pressures, that tire is prone to blow off in a corner. Which I can assure you is usually unpleasant.

    To which the answer may be: kids don't weigh enough to rip a tire off in a corner. In which case, the kid probably doesn't really benefit from tubeless anyways.
    Only reason I care are goat heads.

  20. #6120
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    Quote Originally Posted by XtrPickels View Post
    Only reason I care are goat heads.
    That makes sense. Tube + one of those plastic strips that goes between tube and tire might be easier / more effective.

  21. #6121
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    This stuff worked pretty well for goat head amelioration back in the 00's:

    Name:  slime.jpg
Views: 180
Size:  18.7 KB

    but we also used plastic strips.
    kittyhump.com - Fund Max, Cat Appreciation, Bike

  22. #6122
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    Ask the experts

    Does anybody have any info on how to get OEM pricing from Shimano/SRAM/Fox for a smallish frame builder.
    Just trying to understand the process.
    You can PM if you donít want to share openly.

  23. #6123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toddball View Post
    This stuff worked pretty well for goat head amelioration back in the 00's:

    Name:  slime.jpg
Views: 180
Size:  18.7 KB

    but we also used plastic strips.
    That stuff does work pretty darn well (in tubes). Plastic strips are hit-or-miss. Both would be pretty bulletproof, I think, if not the lightest setup.

    Just to save you the trouble: what does not seem to work well is Stan's juice, injected into tubes (in my case: also for goathead mitigation). I tried that with my daughter's previous bike (Trek 27.5 mtb, which, cheesily, had schraeder valves - upside being that all schraeder cores are removable), and was surprised to find that in short order, a tiny, invisible puncture did not seal, then a few weeks later, another. Not sure what the difference is - maybe the Stan's is not viscous enough...? Sure works well *not* in a tube.

    You can also buy pre-slimed tubes, but I doubt any w/ presta. If you want to use the Slime w/ presta, make sure you get presta tubes that have removable cores (they are out there).

    My 13 y.o.'s current bike is a Giant Trance. Nicer bike than I had until I was like 35 (but she's way into mtb and is shredding pretty hard these days, so wtf). It came stock with tubeless (even came with sealant and did not come with tubes - way to go Giant!), and life is good (not one flat all summer).

  24. #6124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    Does anybody have any info on how to get OEM pricing from Shimano/SRAM/Fox for a smallish frame builder.
    Just trying to understand the process.
    You can PM if you donít want to share openly.
    SRAM website has a "Dealer support" link (thought I'd remembered seeing that), which leads you to "Dealer Portals". But you need an account first, and there is no automated way to set that up. But at the bottom of the page, it says, "If you are a USA Dealer in need of sales support or would like to set up a Sales account, please call SRAM Customer Service at 1-800-231-6755."

    Seems pretty simple - guessing it's similar for Shimano, Fox, etc.

  25. #6125
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    Does anybody have any info on how to get OEM pricing from Shimano/SRAM/Fox for a smallish frame builder.
    Just trying to understand the process.
    You can PM if you donít want to share openly.
    For Shimano, contact your local rep- probably Bradley if youíre in CO. He should be able to get you set up with a frame builder account.


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