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Thread: Ask the experts

  1. #676
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    That's the automatic anti brake squeal feature, duh.



    New o-ring should do it.

  2. #677
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    Attachment 330311
    First day out on the new (to me) DH bike. It would appear oil is coming out at the banjo bolt. Anyone see that before? New o-ring? New brake hose?
    There are 2 o-rings, one on top and one on bottom. These get pinched when moving the angle of the banjo, or lost unbolting the banjo.
    First step is to check the banjo is tight enough, Torque spec is 4-6NM.

  3. #678
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    To suspension fiddle or not to suspension fiddle?

    I'm on the new Enduro Elite, Lyric Select+ up front and Super Deluxe Select+ out back. Trying to decide if I should do the 2021 fork upgrade and a MegNeg out back.

    Basically, right now, I can set the bike up for techy, repeated hits, or I can set it up for flowy jump trails, but I'm having a really hard time finding a middle ground. At approximately Rockshox recommended pressures for my weight (and 30ish% sag) I love the bike on techy stuff, but when it comes to jumps and bermed corners I feel like I'm blowing through the mid stroke trying to pump. At 15 or so PSI over recommend (and 25ish% sag), I love how the bike feels on jump trails, but get way more beat up on repeated hits.

    Coming off Fox front and back on my last few bikes, I always found a middle ground that wasn't quite as plush on little stuff, but felt really supportive, and still allowed me to use all my travel on the biggest hits.

    MegNeg and spring are cheap upgrades that both seem like they'd allow me to maintain sensitivity off the top with more midstroke support? Do it? Suck it up and HTFU?

  4. #679
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    Quote Originally Posted by cydwhit View Post
    To suspension fiddle or not to suspension fiddle?

    I'm on the new Enduro Elite, Lyric Select+ up front and Super Deluxe Select+ out back. Trying to decide if I should do the 2021 fork upgrade and a MegNeg out back.

    Basically, right now, I can set the bike up for techy, repeated hits, or I can set it up for flowy jump trails, but I'm having a really hard time finding a middle ground. At approximately Rockshox recommended pressures for my weight (and 30ish% sag) I love the bike on techy stuff, but when it comes to jumps and bermed corners I feel like I'm blowing through the mid stroke trying to pump. At 15 or so PSI over recommend (and 25ish% sag), I love how the bike feels on jump trails, but get way more beat up on repeated hits.

    Coming off Fox front and back on my last few bikes, I always found a middle ground that wasn't quite as plush on little stuff, but felt really supportive, and still allowed me to use all my travel on the biggest hits.

    MegNeg and spring are cheap upgrades that both seem like they'd allow me to maintain sensitivity off the top with more midstroke support? Do it? Suck it up and HTFU?
    What air spring do you have in your Lyrik? I just got the new C1 version and am happy with the results. To my desired ride height, I was running 80-85 psi in the old Lyrik, which resulted in a bit of harshness on larger hits. I'm now at 75 psi with the new air spring and it sits higher while making the second half of the travel a bit more accessible. It's a pretty cheap part swap and gives you an excuse to do a lowers service, so I think it's worth a try.

    For the rear, it looks like the new Enduro is pretty progressive (http://linkagedesign.blogspot.com/20...duro-2020.html). I don't have personal experience with the Meg Neg can, but from what I've read, it sounds like it's best suited to more linear bikes since the high positive air pressure required to keep the large negative spring from causing excessive sag can make the mid/end of stroke harsher and harder to use full travel.

  5. #680
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    Quote Originally Posted by cydwhit View Post
    To suspension fiddle or not to suspension fiddle?

    I'm on the new Enduro Elite, Lyric Select+ up front and Super Deluxe Select+ out back. Trying to decide if I should do the 2021 fork upgrade and a MegNeg out back.

    Basically, right now, I can set the bike up for techy, repeated hits, or I can set it up for flowy jump trails, but I'm having a really hard time finding a middle ground. At approximately Rockshox recommended pressures for my weight (and 30ish% sag) I love the bike on techy stuff, but when it comes to jumps and bermed corners I feel like I'm blowing through the mid stroke trying to pump. At 15 or so PSI over recommend (and 25ish% sag), I love how the bike feels on jump trails, but get way more beat up on repeated hits.

    Coming off Fox front and back on my last few bikes, I always found a middle ground that wasn't quite as plush on little stuff, but felt really supportive, and still allowed me to use all my travel on the biggest hits.

    MegNeg and spring are cheap upgrades that both seem like they'd allow me to maintain sensitivity off the top with more midstroke support? Do it? Suck it up and HTFU?
    MegNeg increase the size of the negative air chamber. I'd expect that to make the bike more supple off the top, but less supportive through the middle. You might be able to get the result you're looking for by going MegNeg + more air pressure, but I'm skeptical. Ultimately, I think you're going to have a hard time dialing in the feel you're looking for on a shock without compression adjustments. Same thought mostly applies to the fork, although running a bit less pressure and adding 1 volume reducer might help a bit. For whatever it's worth, I found on my Float X2 that I needed to open the low speed compression almost all the way to get the balance of suppleness and support that I wanted (but I also think the bike rides better when it's set up more for suppleness).

    Ultimately, the answer is that the enduro is a long travel bike that's much better at mowing stuff down than pumping and popping. But the bigger the jump is, the less mid-stroke support matters. So the answer is that you should hit bigger jumps.

  6. #681
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    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    MegNeg increase the size of the negative air chamber. I'd expect that to make the bike more supple off the top, but less supportive through the middle. You might be able to get the result you're looking for by going MegNeg + more air pressure, but I'm skeptical. Ultimately, I think you're going to have a hard time dialing in the feel you're looking for on a shock without compression adjustments. Same thought mostly applies to the fork, although running a bit less pressure and adding 1 volume reducer might help a bit. For whatever it's worth, I found on my Float X2 that I needed to open the low speed compression almost all the way to get the balance of suppleness and support that I wanted (but I also think the bike rides better when it's set up more for suppleness).

    Ultimately, the answer is that the enduro is a long travel bike that's much better at mowing stuff down than pumping and popping. But the bigger the jump is, the less mid-stroke support matters. So the answer is that you should hit bigger jumps.
    Yeah... some guy on MTBR keeps spouting that the MegNeg added a bunch of mid stroke support to his Enduro....I knew that's not the primary function of it, and I also should have known better than to trust MTBR people.... Also, I notice the back end of the bike way less, I think it's really close to where I want it, and my biggest adjustment has been adding air pressure to the fork. So I'll try a volume spacer in the fork and probably be just fine.

    I love the bike set up to plow, and I'm definitely in that place where I have way more time to mess with suspension than I have trails to ride, so I'm overanalyzing like crazy.

    And yeah, the key is bigger jumps. Riding town DJ's on a 170 mm bike just feels stupid. Melt snow, melt!

  7. #682
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    Quote Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
    What air spring do you have in your Lyrik? I just got the new C1 version and am happy with the results. To my desired ride height, I was running 80-85 psi in the old Lyrik, which resulted in a bit of harshness on larger hits. I'm now at 75 psi with the new air spring and it sits higher while making the second half of the travel a bit more accessible. It's a pretty cheap part swap and gives you an excuse to do a lowers service, so I think it's worth a try.

    For the rear, it looks like the new Enduro is pretty progressive (http://linkagedesign.blogspot.com/20...duro-2020.html). I don't have personal experience with the Meg Neg can, but from what I've read, it sounds like it's best suited to more linear bikes since the high positive air pressure required to keep the large negative spring from causing excessive sag can make the mid/end of stroke harsher and harder to use full travel.
    I'm on the old air spring, so that seems like an easy call to upgrade. Mostly just waiting to ride the fork a bit more so that I can actually justify doing a lowers service at the same time haha. Some of the problem I think comes from the fact that I'm really use to Fox forks that sit higher in the travel, and I end up feeling like my front end is low and diving, even at recommended sag and pressure.

  8. #683
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    Quote Originally Posted by cydwhit View Post
    Yeah... some guy on MTBR keeps spouting that the MegNeg added a bunch of mid stroke support to his Enduro....I knew that's not the primary function of it, and I also should have known better than to trust MTBR people.... Also, I notice the back end of the bike way less, I think it's really close to where I want it, and my biggest adjustment has been adding air pressure to the fork. So I'll try a volume spacer in the fork and probably be just fine.

    I love the bike set up to plow, and I'm definitely in that place where I have way more time to mess with suspension than I have trails to ride, so I'm overanalyzing like crazy.

    And yeah, the key is bigger jumps. Riding town DJ's on a 170 mm bike just feels stupid. Melt snow, melt!
    I also think that smaller, lippy-er jumps feel weird on that bike as much as anything because it's pretty damn long. The more dirt jumpy the lip is, the more I've struggled to make it feel not stupid on the enduro.

  9. #684
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    Quote Originally Posted by cydwhit View Post
    Yeah... some guy on MTBR keeps spouting that the MegNeg added a bunch of mid stroke support to his Enduro....
    Others can correct me, but my understanding is that the increased mid-stroke support associated with a larger negative spring is a product of the higher positive air spring pressure that needs to be run, which results in a higher spring rate in the second half of the travel.

  10. #685
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    Quote Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
    Others can correct me, but my understanding is that the increased mid-stroke support associated with a larger negative spring is a product of the higher positive air spring pressure that needs to be run, which results in a higher spring rate in the second half of the travel.
    That makes sense, and theoretically you could tune the negative air chamber with volume reducers. There'd need to be a balance of negative volume, air pressure in the positive, all based on the leverage curve of the bike.

    But that level of tuning on a shock that doesn't have high / low compression adjustments kinda seems like a very roundabout way to address the issue.

  11. #686
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    Iíve got three year old Guide brakes, and lately Iíve been working through some issues. After some harsh spring rides i replaced the pads. After a few more rides i started noticing the lever wasnít rebounding after a squeeze, and the pads were not retracting either, causing lots of drag. I replaced the fluid and bled the system, hoping that would do it, but lever feel and return still isnít great. Ideas?


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  12. #687
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    Quote Originally Posted by riff View Post
    I’ve got three year old Guide brakes, and lately I’ve been working through some issues. After some harsh spring rides i replaced the pads. After a few more rides i started noticing the lever wasn’t rebounding after a squeeze, and the pads were not retracting either, causing lots of drag. I replaced the fluid and bled the system, hoping that would do it, but lever feel and return still isn’t great. Ideas?

    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Piston retraction is mostly driven by the caliper piston seals, and can go to hell once they get old and tired. I'd rebuild the caliper with new seals.

    Well, actually, I'd probably take a flamethrower to the Guides and buying something else. But if you're happy enough with them when they are working normally, caliper seals should do it.

  13. #688
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    I replaced caliper seals once. Never again. Typically shops will not do it either.

    Buy a new brake. You will fight that one forever. Not worth it once you accept it is fucked.

    I've got boxes full of brakes that I use as spare levers or calipers.

  14. #689
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    Quote Originally Posted by HAB View Post
    Piston retraction is mostly driven by the caliper piston seals, and can go to hell once they get old and tired. I'd rebuild the caliper with new seals.
    Quote Originally Posted by simple View Post
    I replaced caliper seals once. Never again. Typically shops will not do it either.
    Buy a new brake. You will fight that one forever. Not worth it once you accept it is fucked.
    I've got boxes full of brakes that I use as spare levers or calipers.
    Caliper seals are a pain to do. First I would try cleaning your pistons and lubing your seals really well. Use a modified bleed block that allows just one piston to extend, clean the piston really well, lube the seals with brake fluid, push the piston back in, and repeat the process with the other side.
    This may fix/help your problem, or at least limp you along a little longer before you decided to replace your brakes.

  15. #690
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    ^^^ agreed. I've had good luck on guides with just popping the pistons out, cleaning, and then reinstalling with fresh fluid.

  16. #691
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    Quote Originally Posted by riff View Post
    I’ve got three year old Guide brakes, and lately I’ve been working through some issues. After some harsh spring rides i replaced the pads. After a few more rides i started noticing the lever wasn’t rebounding after a squeeze, and the pads were not retracting either, causing lots of drag. I replaced the fluid and bled the system, hoping that would do it, but lever feel and return still isn’t great. Ideas?


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    For a few years, Guides had problems with the master cylinder pistons being slightly oversized. Just enough that, when heated, they wouldn't return properly.
    Check with a dealer for warranty.
    Then...
    Sell them to an enemy and buy Shimano.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jer View Post
    After the first three seconds, Corbet's is really pretty average.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Malcolm View Post
    I mean, it's not your fault. They say talent skips a generation.
    But hey, I'm sure your kids will be sharp as tacks.

  17. #692
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    Or skip Shimano and get spend more for Magura or Hope brakes which feel awesome

  18. #693
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    Ok, excellent detail folks! Iíll try a good cleaning and go from there


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  19. #694
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    Quote Originally Posted by simple View Post
    Or skip Shimano and get spend more for Magura or Hope brakes which feel awesome
    *insert obligatory Hayes Dominion A4 plug here*

  20. #695
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    Yeah, make some recommendations- i bought this bike ladt year after a decade riding rigid bikes pretty casually. Not up to speed on the new hotness; bike is an alloy transition smuggler


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  21. #696
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    Quote Originally Posted by riff View Post
    Yeah, make some recommendations- i bought this bike ladt year after a decade riding rigid bikes pretty casually. Not up to speed on the new hotness; bike is an alloy transition smuggler


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    That's a dangerous question. You're about to get recommendations for pretty much every option on the market.

    If you can get your pistons moving freely, the guides are fine. No need to spend a couple hundred on a debatable upgrade.

  22. #697
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    Quote Originally Posted by riff View Post
    Yeah, make some recommendations- i bought this bike ladt year after a decade riding rigid bikes pretty casually. Not up to speed on the new hotness; bike is an alloy transition smuggler


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    In that case I'd just try to get the Guides working, they're probably just fine for you. Definitely have a shop check the serial numbers first to see if they have the defective master cylinders Roxtar mentioned.

  23. #698
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    Quote Originally Posted by riff View Post
    Iíve got three year old Guide brakes, and lately Iíve been working through some issues. After some harsh spring rides i replaced the pads. After a few more rides i started noticing the lever wasnít rebounding after a squeeze, and the pads were not retracting either, causing lots of drag. I replaced the fluid and bled the system, hoping that would do it, but lever feel and return still isnít great. Ideas?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Quote Originally Posted by Roxtar View Post
    For a few years, Guides had problems with the master cylinder pistons being slightly oversized. Just enough that, when heated, they wouldn't return properly.
    Check with a dealer for warranty.
    Then...
    Sell them to an enemy and buy Shimano.
    Roxtar has you right here. Your symptoms and brake age are correct for this issue. It tends to be worse the warmer it gets. I have literally replaced 100's of guide levers because of this issue. Good news is the replacements work.
    a positive attitude will not solve all of your problems, but it may annoy enough people to make it worth the effort

    Formerly Rludes025

  24. #699
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    Quote Originally Posted by simple View Post
    ...........
    I've got boxes full of brakes that I use as spare levers or calipers.
    You got a left/front Saint lever in there? I got a janky one that works well enough I havenít dealt with it yet.


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  25. #700
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    You got a left/front Saint lever in there? I got a janky one that works well enough I havenít dealt with it yet.


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    I've got one. PM me

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