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Thread: Ask the experts

  1. #6426
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    Thanks. Between what I’ve read here and elsewhere online, I think I’m going to avoid the temptation for now.

  2. #6427
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Barron DeJong View Post
    Thanks. I found the video at the end of that thread when I first ran into this issue. The sound on my bike is just like that, and it does go away when lubing the part he says, it just won’t stay away.

    Going to try some of the other ideas just to eliminate them, but can’t say I’m feeling very confident as of now.
    Took the cassette off and cleaned the mating surfaces between it and the freebody, put it back together and no noise. Fuck I suck at diagnosing noise!

    The cassette is a CS-M9100, not CS-M9101, so the spacer isn’t stuck on, and there’s no loose spacer there. At least I know what the issue is now.

    This is on a 2021 Norco Optic I bought used, so either Norco still had some original 12-sp XTR cassettes hangin around, or the seller swapped an old one on.

  3. #6428
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    Ask the experts

    Quote Originally Posted by J. Barron DeJong View Post
    Fuck I suck at diagnosing noise!
    Noises are thought, they resonate though the bike, sometimes sending vibrations and sounds to the opposite end of the bike.
    75% of the “my bottom bracket is creaky” bikes I work on, it’s not the bottom bracket.
    You develop an ear for some things, and the brain instantly recognizes those sounds when it hears them.
    I’ll pedal their bike around the parking lot and say “your bottom bracket does not creak when I stand up, what do you think it could be?”
    “Let’s clean lube and tighten your seat rails first. “

  4. #6429
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    Noises are thought, they resonate though the bike, sometimes sending vibrations and sounds to the opposite end of the bike.
    75% of the “my bottom bracket is creaky” bikes I work on, it’s not the bottom bracket.
    You develop an ear for some things, and the brain instantly recognizes those sounds when it hears them.
    I’ll pedal their bike around the parking lot and say “your bottom bracket does not creak when I stand up, what do you think it could be?”
    “Let’s clean lube and tighten your seat rails first. “
    A customer had an intermittent click, another shop didnt find it, I worked on it didnt find it, another guy in the shop worked on it, BB and shit repelced

    on the 3rd or 4th attempt the rear QR was found to be half way loose so the wheel would intermittently shift in the drop-outs and make a noise, some how the back wheel had never been off in spite of 3 or 4 guys working on the bike

    After diagnosing the noisy seat post on my Yeti i'm liking that carbon paste I often put it on things like seat rails

    do you think there are more noises from carbon bikes ??
    Last edited by XXX-er; 11-09-2021 at 01:09 PM.
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  5. #6430
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    Noises are thought, they resonate though the bike, sometimes sending vibrations and sounds to the opposite end of the bike.
    75% of the “my bottom bracket is creaky” bikes I work on, it’s not the bottom bracket.
    You develop an ear for some things, and the brain instantly recognizes those sounds when it hears them.
    I’ll pedal their bike around the parking lot and say “your bottom bracket does not creak when I stand up, what do you think it could be?”
    “Let’s clean lube and tighten your seat rails first. “
    yeah, well aware from my time working in a shop that noises are tough. Doesn’t mean I don’t wish I was better at diagnosing them though!

    I have no patience for people who get on forums and complain that they took a bike to a shop because of a noise, and had to return because the noise wasn’t fixed.

  6. #6431
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    My most recent clicking diagnoses turned out to be worn out bearings in the derailleur jockey wheels (tried that after the bottom bracket). Pulling the covers off, the grease had been all flushed out and they had a lot of lateral play. I tried regreasing them and they were quiet for a ride or two but then it returned. I just replaced them with the $24 GX ones, and everything was quiet again.

  7. #6432
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    What shoes should I get?

    I’ve had a few pairs of Specialized 2FO Cliplite over the past few years and have zero complaints, but they’re discontinued. They strike a good balance between weight, stiffness and protection.

  8. #6433
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    Quote Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
    What shoes should I get?

    I’ve had a few pairs of Specialized 2FO Cliplite over the past few years and have zero complaints, but they’re discontinued. They strike a good balance between weight, stiffness and protection.
    I’ve been happy with my Shimano ME7’s for the same reasons you stated.

  9. #6434
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    I’m also a fan of the ME7’s.
    crab in my shoe mouth

  10. #6435
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    Shimano ME5 if you want the boa in lieu of the sinch lace and flap


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  11. #6436
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    Quote Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
    What shoes should I get?

    I’ve had a few pairs of Specialized 2FO Cliplite over the past few years and have zero complaints, but they’re discontinued. They strike a good balance between weight, stiffness and protection.
    get some that fit

    I've had or have several pair of Spesh (lower volume thru ankle/ wider in front) and they all fit me

    I wanted to like the 2 pair of Shimano i ended up giving away ( too much volume thru the ankle/midfoot ) but they just did not fit

    I don't know if thats how all Shimano fit but I am sticking with Spesh
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  12. #6437
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    I've got a 2019 Transition Patrol and its heavy AF. Looking to make it feel less sluggish and roll a bit better. I'm thinking losing some of weight on the rear wheel would be my best bet. I have a hydra hub, on a heavy spank rim. What would be the lightest strongest carbon rim I could upgrade to that is going to withstand a beating? I get a wellness bonus at work to use on stuff like this, so I'm not super worried about the cost. Those Nobl TR37s look pretty sweet. Is there something better if I'm willing to spend a bit more?

  13. #6438
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    I have no personal experience but the video of Danny Macaskil trying to destroy the Reserve wheels is pretty compelling. I have carbon wheels on 3 of my bikes but I am not terribly hard on them. If I were, and I had the money, I would seriously consider those wheels.

    https://youtu.be/VfjjiHGuHoc

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  14. #6439
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    For just about every carbon rim out there, I personally know someone who has destroyed one. And for just about every carbon rim out there, I personally know someone who has beat the shit out of it without issues. And the same goes for aluminum rims.

    With some exceptions, I think it kind of just comes down to luck. Of the current well respected carbon rim options, I think most of the options are decent.

  15. #6440
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    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    With some exceptions, I think it kind of just comes down to luck.
    And a factor of 3-10x investment.
    Lots of Cream, Lots of Sugar

  16. #6441
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    And a factor of 3-10x investment.
    Depending on how you look at it.

    Personally, I destroy aluminum rims way, way faster than carbon. Cost wise, it's about a wash, and carbon rides better.

  17. #6442
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    Regarding the integrity of carbon, it has A LOT to do with quality control in manufacturing.
    A German Mag from about 5 years ago did an extensive test of carbon handlebars. Cycling them hundreds of times to fatigue. Testing at least 3 bars from each model.
    The end result was that only 2 brands had any semblance of consistency within their sample. For most of them, One of Brand A Model A bars would break early on in the number of cycles while another would go 2-3 times longer and a third would break somewhere in between. Or they would all suck, but the real takehome was that you wouldn't know which one you got until it failed.
    Only Enve and Syntace had consistency within their runs. The Enve bars consistenly broke near the max limit of cycles. The Syntace bars, all of them, failed to break during the tests.

    Now extrapolate that into the awesome video Danny did with SC rims. And it helps explain why that guy you know has broken 3 SC rims in the last 2 years. And why some bruisers swear by the SixC cranks and other people won't trust them. The quality control/consistency is getting better, but it still leaves a shit ton of room for inconsistency. Do you really think Race Face has mastered the QC game?
    Lots of Cream, Lots of Sugar

  18. #6443
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    I'm a light weight, 155ish + gear and pretty smooth rider, I'd never really broken wheels and therefore eschewed carbon wheels as an expensive luxury even though in retrospect I spent a lot of time tightening loose spokes and truing out wobbles. Sold an unneeded bike in spring 2020 so splurged on some Reserve 30's....haven't had to touch them once in 2 seasons of riding, they've been awesome, and I love the way they ride.

  19. #6444
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    Well, the crank thing is a bit different. Those are the aluminum inserts in the crank coming unbonded from the carbon. It's a tricky issue, because carbon cures with heat and the aluminum bits expand and then cool at a different rate than the carbon, which makes it tough to get a good bond. It's still a QC issue, but not really the same as a carbon rim exploding.

    But that aside, fully agree that QC is an issue. I'd argue it's an issue on lots of bike products, including plenty of aluminum ones. The difference is that the industry has been working with aluminum for long enough to have figured out where they need to add in some extra material to account for realistic variances in QC. But back in the 90's when the industry was figuring out aluminum, frames (and plenty of other parts) broke all the time. Which is why modern aluminum frames tend to be pretty porky.

    And 5 years ago, a lot of the carbon rim manufacturers hadn't quite figured things out yet, but most of them have gotten there now. Carbon rims from 5 years ago were a lot different than the current ones - ride quality was hit or miss (lots were too stiff), and plenty of them broke. Now they mostly ride really nicely, and they're generally pretty durable because the companies have figured out where to add a bit more material (or a different layup) to account for QC variances.

  20. #6445
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    Random question that I've never tested.

    Does a narrower MTB tire (like a 2.1 or 2.2) roll faster than a 2.35 on firm terrain? I'm looking at a few long bikepacking trips that'll be mostly dirt roads, some paved and just a little singletrack. Just wondering about ideal tires, I've only ridden 2.3 and above for the last decade plus.

    I'm doing the white rim in a week so I'm thinking that might be a good place to test something narrower.

  21. #6446
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    I think tread pattern has a lot more impact on rolling resistance than a small difference in width. Get the least tread you can stand.

    For the WR if it's moist, a 2.2 XC tire will be great. If it's dry you'll be happier with a bit more width for the floatation. You can prob get by with a full on file tread for the described bikepacking objectives.
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  22. #6447
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    My experience on a hardtail, riding from Banff through Montana on the Tour Divide (for surface info). Two trips, similar routes.

    When I was in shape, 1.95 and 2.1 renegades, Niner carbon fork. Fast and good, tubeless. Again, I was light and in racing shape.

    Next time, plus 25lbs, solo so more gear. Carbon Firestarter fork. Went 2.35 Fast Trak front and rear. These were much better for me being heavier, more supple. Slower, but better


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  23. #6448
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    Narrower is lighter and more aerodynamic, but if anything the wider version of a tire might have slightly better rolling resistance. It's pretty slight when you are comparing equivalent pressure. There's a reason no one rides 21-23mm road tires anymore and XC racers are starting to use 2.4s on 30mm rims. Plus with more weight more volume will be better.

    I'm kind of on the fence for what to do with my next xc tires. A 2.25 mezcal already measures almost 2.4 on my wheels so I don't know if I should bother with the slightly heaver 2.35.

  24. #6449
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shredeagle View Post
    I've got a 2019 Transition Patrol and its heavy AF. Looking to make it feel less sluggish and roll a bit better. I'm thinking losing some of weight on the rear wheel would be my best bet. I have a hydra hub, on a heavy spank rim. What would be the lightest strongest carbon rim I could upgrade to that is going to withstand a beating? I get a wellness bonus at work to use on stuff like this, so I'm not super worried about the cost. Those Nobl TR37s look pretty sweet. Is there something better if I'm willing to spend a bit more?
    You’re likely only going to save ~50 grams going to a “endurobro” carbon rim. Unless you have a boat anchor back there.

    I think the rim manufacturers beefed up their layup (and weight) in order to safely offer better warranties….

    The other positives already mentioned are the main reason to go carbon; durability and ride…

    I like my WAO Unions.


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  25. #6450
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    You’re likely only going to save ~50 grams going to a “endurobro” carbon rim. Unless you have a boat anchor back there.

    I think the rim manufacturers beefed up their layup (and weight) in order to safely offer better warranties….

    The other positives already mentioned are the main reason to go carbon; durability and ride…

    I like my WAO Unions.

    Agreed re: other reasons, but it's worth mentioning that NOBL TR37 wheelset is in the 1700 gram range, depending on hubs. Pretty dang light for an enduro wheelset.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

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