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Thread: Ask the experts

  1. #9051
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post
    That's basically what I've always done when I've gotten a bike. I've just never run Assegais and have read how slow rolling they are, so I was considering just saving the rear for when I need a new front.
    my jong ass doesn't have much business doling out advice, but even I was blown away by how much faster rolling a DHR2 is over an Assegai. I'd vote to shelve it like you say

  2. #9052
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post
    What are people running as a rear tire for chunky, loose desert riding? Trails are rocky, sometimes hard, sometimes loose over hard (especially right now after we had a decent monsoon). I'm getting a new bike that comes with Assegai's front/rear, but that seems like overkill for the rear.
    Aggressor for me. It lacks braking traction a bit when it gets really steep/loose though.

  3. #9053
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    Quote Originally Posted by singlesline View Post
    So, DIY carbon frame repair--who's done it?

    (Obviously yer gonna die and all that)...found a couple threads of people planning to do it with no results, found some threads on other forums of people actually doing it.

    Top tube took a solid impact in the crash that broke my face. Honestly not even sure how or what it it--damage is on the wrong side for how I landed, but the bike took a tumble. Cracks go in a couple of directions but don't seem to extend too far.

    Seems like a solvable problem that will just leave me with some extra weight. Sand the paint down to survey the damage, clean up the broken areas, and then wrap with a few layers of carbon with the layer lengths tapering to avoid stress risers.

    I've done fiberglass repair work on sailboats and lots of random other epoxy stuff (e.g. skis) but never worked with carbon. No tough angles or weird shapes to go around so a $50 cloth+resin kit and some heat-shrink release tape ought to do it and even give me enough material for some practice runs.

    And yes, I'm sure Intense would sell me a crash replacement front triangle...and yes, while that costs more money up front, you probably make that back in resale value...but I like doing this shit and between healing up and winter coming, I've got free time. (Besides, I usually run my bikes into the ground...and this Costco Intense 951 Covid-bike wasn't going to have great resale anyways).
    Havenít done it, but these guys have great how-to videos and Iím sure one of the techniques would be suitable. (I believe thereís one on how to make your own carbon tubes over a pipe which would likely work for you.)

    https://m.youtube.com/user/easycompositestv/videos

    Makes me want to get a whole vacuum infusion set up to build, umm, something?

  4. #9054
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    Quote Originally Posted by singlesline View Post
    So, DIY carbon frame repair--who's done it?

    (Obviously yer gonna die and all that)...found a couple threads of people planning to do it with no results, found some threads on other forums of people actually doing it.

    Top tube took a solid impact in the crash that broke my face. Honestly not even sure how or what it it--damage is on the wrong side for how I landed, but the bike took a tumble. Cracks go in a couple of directions but don't seem to extend too far.

    Seems like a solvable problem that will just leave me with some extra weight. Sand the paint down to survey the damage, clean up the broken areas, and then wrap with a few layers of carbon with the layer lengths tapering to avoid stress risers.

    I've done fiberglass repair work on sailboats and lots of random other epoxy stuff (e.g. skis) but never worked with carbon. No tough angles or weird shapes to go around so a $50 cloth+resin kit and some heat-shrink release tape ought to do it and even give me enough material for some practice runs.

    And yes, I'm sure Intense would sell me a crash replacement front triangle...and yes, while that costs more money up front, you probably make that back in resale value...but I like doing this shit and between healing up and winter coming, I've got free time. (Besides, I usually run my bikes into the ground...and this Costco Intense 951 Covid-bike wasn't going to have great resale anyways).
    Not DIY but I had a frame repaired at Calfee in California. Was relatively inexpensive (couple hundred bucks) and it came with a warranty. Peace of mind is worth something when you are hauling and not having to wonder if you used enough epoxy...

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  5. #9055
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowaddict91 View Post
    Aggressor for me. It lacks braking traction a bit when it gets really steep/loose though.
    I read a lot of good things about the Aggressor for a desert rear tire, but I don't think it comes in an EXO+ sidewall. I've been fairly lucky (at least given where I ride), so I was hoping to avoid a full Double Down tire, but worried that EXO might be a bit light.

  6. #9056
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    Quote Originally Posted by sethschmautz View Post
    Not DIY but I had a frame repaired at Calfee in California. Was relatively inexpensive (couple hundred bucks) and it came with a warranty. Peace of mind is worth something when you are hauling and not having to wonder if you used enough epoxy...

    Sent from my SM-S908U using Tapatalk
    Yeah, I've seen both Calfee and Ruckus's work in person--they both do awesome work. Repairs are seamless and weigh within a few grams of original.

    Where they really stand out is is full-restorations. Color matched paint, reconstructed decals, color fades, everything. No way to replicate that level of work DIY. They are also better at inspecting your shit...ultrasound machines and all that.


    If I were doing it myself, I would 100% overdo it (aim to increase the weight of the frame a bit rather than have a truly seamless repair with no added material) and would probably do a clearcoat finish to leave the battle scars visible.
    I wouldn't worry about using *enough* epoxy as the heat-shrink tape will basically land you at the right amount (you'll actually be squeezing out a ton of excess). Using the right resin/hardener is a concern, but you solve that by leaving behind a test scrap from the same batch that you use for your layup--if the test is good, the repair is good.

    Mostly think this is a project I would enjoy attempting and I'm not too worried about it it catastrophically failing...

  7. #9057
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post
    I read a lot of good things about the Aggressor for a desert rear tire, but I don't think it comes in an EXO+ sidewall. I've been fairly lucky (at least given where I ride), so I was hoping to avoid a full Double Down tire, but worried that EXO might be a bit light.
    That's a fair point. I recently switched to DD rear after putting holes in too many EXOs.

  8. #9058
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post
    What are people running as a rear tire for chunky, loose desert riding? Trails are rocky, sometimes hard, sometimes loose over hard (especially right now after we had a decent monsoon). I'm getting a new bike that comes with Assegai's front/rear, but that seems like overkill for the rear.
    Assuming it's not an mullet setup, just pull the rear tire and save it for a new front. Then put on a fresh DHR. Dissector is much faster rolling but will wear out really fast in desert. If you're not afraid of mixed tire brands, the Spec Eliminator is kinda midway between DHR & Dissector, like a less sucky Aggressor.

  9. #9059
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    Assuming it's not an mullet setup, just pull the rear tire and save it for a new front. Then put on a fresh DHR. Dissector is much faster rolling but will wear out really fast in desert. If you're not afraid of mixed tire brands, the Spec Eliminator is kinda midway between DHR & Dissector, like a less sucky Aggressor.
    I'm interested in the Spec tires. The shop in my immediate town is a Spec dealer and while I don't like them enough to pay much more, I like to patronize them for smaller things where the delta isn't large.

  10. #9060
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    Ask the experts

    Not too much time on it yet, but so far the Spec Eliminator has lasted longer than my aggressor EXO. No complaints so far, run it a few rocky and some steep lines.

    Also on the frame repair, good friend has repaired his DIY twice. I think one was a chainstay, not sure where the other is. He is in dire need of a new bike, but his repairs have held way longer than I expected, one at least 5 years.


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  11. #9061
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    X4 or whatever on specialized eliminator being a pretty decent rear. I have mine paired with a dhf front and that combo works well.

  12. #9062
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    I reapaired a cracked rim and rode it hard for like another year. The guy I sold it to 3 years ago is still rallying it.

    I vote to go for it if you're not concerned about weight or looks. It will be plenty strong.

    Oh, and Assguys are indeed incredibly slow on the rear. I vote save it for the front.
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  13. #9063
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post
    I'm interested in the Spec tires. The shop in my immediate town is a Spec dealer and while I don't like them enough to pay much more, I like to patronize them for smaller things where the delta isn't large.
    Just make sure you get the 2.3 version. It's bigger than a Maxxis 2.4, and the 2.6 is a legit 2.6. And even at full retail, you'll probably be able to get them for $20-25 less than a Maxxis these days.

  14. #9064
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    12 speed shimano m8100 chain wear at 0.5%. According to LBS. No CASSETTE
    SHIMANO XT M8100 | 10-51T | 12-speed†I Hyperglide+ available without internet price gouging.

    Replace chain now? LBS recommends waiting until 0.75 - 0.1% to replace chain and cassette. Assuming cassettes available then. They say not to risk poor mating with a new chain now without a cassette available.

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  15. #9065
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    I was always a DHF/Aggressor (or dissector) combo kind of guy, but after my Element came with Rekon front and rear I've been enjoying trying the more XC tires. Now I just run the new Forekaster front and rear and dig it, almost like an aggressor but even faster with side knobs that don't mess around.

  16. #9066
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    Sure there are slight advantages/disadvantages to every tire tread. Personally, I've found more value in picking patterns and sticking with them. Several seasons now with Assegai front and DHR2 rear. After hundreds of miles you really starts to intimately known where/when each pattern will break lose.

    In the past I switched tires a lot and I think it slowed me down always learning how a new tire acts.

    Assegai does work good as a rear and has a ton of lateral grip and slightly less braking grip than the DHR2. I like to be able to let the rear break loose before the front when pushing in turns so that's why I run the ass-dhr2 combo.

    If you love more of an "on rails" feel the Assegai in the rear will give you that, but in my opinion it's too unforgiving. It can be "too grippy" laterally in some conditions if that makes any sense.

  17. #9067
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteroom_Guardian View Post
    Sure there are slight advantages/disadvantages to every tire tread. Personally, I've found more value in picking patterns and sticking with them. Several seasons now with Assegai front and DHR2 rear. After hundreds of miles you really starts to intimately known where/when each pattern will break lose.

    In the past I switched tires a lot and I think it slowed me down always learning how a new tire acts.

    Assegai does work good as a rear and has a ton of lateral grip and slightly less braking grip than the DHR2. I like to be able to let the rear break loose before the front when pushing in turns so that's why I run the ass-dhr2 combo.

    If you love more of an "on rails" feel the Assegai in the rear will give you that, but in my opinion it's too unforgiving. It can be "too grippy" laterally in some conditions if that makes any sense.
    This has been my experience as well. Also why I don't love the aggressor as a rear.
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  18. #9068
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinipenem View Post
    12 speed shimano m8100 chain wear at 0.5%. According to LBS. No CASSETTE
    SHIMANO XT M8100 | 10-51T | 12-speed I Hyperglide+ available without internet price gouging.

    Replace chain now? LBS recommends waiting until 0.75 - 0.1% to replace chain and cassette. Assuming cassettes available then. They say not to risk poor mating with a new chain now without a cassette available.

    Sent from my SM-S908U1 using Tapatalk
    Is this your first chain on that cassette?

    Sounds to me like LBS wants to sell you a cassette. I think you should replace chain now. Replacing at 0.5% you should be able to get several chains before your cassette is worn...running the first chain out to 0.1% and then replacing both seems like an expensive way to do things.

    Don't replace the cassette until it starts giving you trouble (skipping) or is visible worn. Probably get 3 chains through it, maybe more.

  19. #9069
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    The new 12 speed stuff is finicky.
    With Shimano 12s the new chain at </= 0.5 should be no problem.
    As others have stated you should be able to get 2 or 3 < 0.5 chain changes on a XT 12s cassette.
    The chainring will wear out before the cassette does, and by the the 3rd chain, but this only effects chain retention, it does not effect the shifting effectiveness with a worn chainring.
    I just did a full refresh of an XTR system worn well down past 1.0. I'll post some picture of it.

    With SRAM 12s, the XX1 and XO1 chains will last longer than the XX1/XO1 cassettes, so with that system you typically replace the chainring 1/2 way through its life, and run the chain and cassette into the ground. New chains mid life don't make sense, unless you're upgrading a GX level chain. Their steel chainrings will last 75% the life of the cassette, and the light aluminum ones last 30% of the life of the chain and chainring.

  20. #9070
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    The new 12 speed stuff is finicky.

    With SRAM 12s, the XX1 and XO1 chains will last longer than the XX1/XO1 cassettes, so with that system you typically replace the chainring 1/2 way through its life, and run the chain and cassette into the ground. New chains mid life don't make sense, unless you're upgrading a GX level chain. Their steel chainrings will last 75% the life of the cassette, and the light aluminum ones last 30% of the life of the chain and chainring.
    yeah I just upgraded an XX1 (?) chain with a X01 after > 1200 kms of low speed/ high stress on an E-bike even tho it wasn't at .75 yet but i did it anyway just on spec. It always shifts but clunks so bad I typically back off for a lot of the shifts

    The chain ring ( Shimano EM600 Crank Arms ) & cassette (PG1210 ( NX ) looks ok but how do you tell ?

    I'm glad I kept the NX eagle XX1 chain as a spare, should i reuse it after this chain reaches a certain % of wear ??
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  21. #9071
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    Chainring wear is pretty obvious.
    This XTR 32t is cooked:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Iíll take some photos of the XTR cassette that was also with it.

  22. #9072
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    Re carbon: knew a mtb guide in Italy who had a bunch of ghetto carbon self repairs on rims, frame, even handlebars. Go overkill fugly and youíre golden!

    Re Specialized rubber. Iíve had a Butcher T9 (whatever the stickiest one is) on front of my trail bike for three seasons now. Iíd say itís equal to or maybe a slight step down from Maxterra in grip. Definitely not confidence inspiring like a Maxgrip.
    The upside is durability. Iíd put one in the back, but not again up front.


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    However many are in a shit ton.

  23. #9073
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    Chainring wear is pretty obvious.

    Iíll take some photos of the XTR cassette that was also with it.
    I went for a ride and checked the chain ring, while the crank arms are Shimano the chain ring is a 34T SRAM, it doesnt scratch with a nail so i think its steel and it looks good
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  24. #9074
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    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    I went for a ride and checked the chain ring, while the crank arms are Shimano the chain ring is a 34T SRAM, it doesnt scratch with a nail so i think its steel and it looks good
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    Forum Cross Pollinator, gratuitously strident

  25. #9075
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    Is that ^^ Gene Simmons ?
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

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