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Thread: Ask the experts

  1. #6626
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Granite, UT
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    1,435
    Quote Originally Posted by Billow View Post
    Or just get a hand pump pressure sprayer and fill it with hot water for like $20.
    That would take 6 days to get any considerable mud off of the bike, let alone road salt in the winter months.

    I picked this up a few years ago. Amazing.

  2. #6627
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,530
    Yeah I thought the hand pump weed sprayer was a good idea for camping/biking trips so I could clean the bike in the field.

    It wasnít. It barely puts out any water and basically no pressure to wash muck off.

  3. #6628
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Tahoe-ish
    Posts
    2,221
    The pump sprayer works well for desert dust, but I'll concede that it wouldn't be great for mud.
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  4. #6629
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    26,903
    it would be more than adequate for washing all the grease out of bearings
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  5. #6630
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Back in Seattle
    Posts
    817
    TRP 2.3mm rotors in sram codes do they fit?

  6. #6631
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,140
    Winter project DJ build, so far only $225 in for frame and fork. Think Iím getting a $120 26Ē wheel set. But trying to remember whether RF Turbine 24mm spindles are compatible w Shimano Hollowtech external BB cups? Have some OEM cranks that would be great for this, but only have Shimano BBs around.

    Pretty sure itíll work, unlike a 22/24mm GXP style. Google search mostly said yes. Also need headset and got 760mm bars from buddy for a beer.
    Also lol at my using a Thomson Masterpiece post and Lynskey stock seatpost clamp.


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  7. #6632
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    BC to CO
    Posts
    4,137
    RF Turbine 24mm spindle will work with your Shimano 24mm external cups.

  8. #6633
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,140
    Sweet thanks DH.


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  9. #6634
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Can/USA
    Posts
    1,409
    190mm rear fatbike. Have a 170mm RF cinch spindle, cranks have a rotor oval ring. Anyone know how many spacers and on what side?? Basically Iíve messed around and have a bunchÖ haha. Drive line looks kinda funkyÖ donít think I can flip the ring unless I really load the drive side with spacers, maybe thatís the answer? I really hate all the BB stuff


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  10. #6635
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Mid-tomahawk
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    1,543
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandbox View Post
    190mm rear fatbike. Have a 170mm RF cinch spindle, cranks have a rotor oval ring. Anyone know how many spacers and on what side?? Basically I’ve messed around and have a bunch… haha. Drive line looks kinda funky… don’t think I can flip the ring unless I really load the drive side with spacers, maybe that’s the answer? I really hate all the BB stuff


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    Official RF doc on the subject is here: https://www.chrissports.ch/content/f...chainlines.pdf

  11. #6636
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    BC to CO
    Posts
    4,137
    Chain line for a 190mm rear hub should be 76.5mm
    Race Face 169.5mm spindle works with the following BBs:
    BSA 83, BB104, BB107, PF3083mm = 10mm spacer on each side, both drive side and non-drive side.
    IF you have the following BBs:
    BSA 100mm, BB121, BB125, PF30 100mm = 1.5mm on each side.

  12. #6637
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    633
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandbox View Post
    190mm rear fatbike. Have a 170mm RF cinch spindle, cranks have a rotor oval ring. Anyone know how many spacers and on what side?? Basically Iíve messed around and have a bunchÖ haha. Drive line looks kinda funkyÖ donít think I can flip the ring unless I really load the drive side with spacers, maybe thatís the answer? I really hate all the BB stuff


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    My take on this is, don't try to match a mfg chainline spec, do what works for your riding. You spend a lot of time in the three biggest cogs, like me, get the chainring as close to the chainstay as you can. Move it out a few mm if you're in the middle of the cogs more.

    Pretend you're at home Depot trying to pick out the straightest 2x4, and sight down the chainline in the range where you ride the most. Pick spacers to get it straighter in that spot, it should have less of a "Z" kinda shape in your go-to range.

  13. #6638
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Can/USA
    Posts
    1,409
    Thanks fellas, all helpful info!


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  14. #6639
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    North Van
    Posts
    3,595
    As a result of a wet fall and now a blanketing of snow in southwestern BC, I have been heading to the indoor dirt jump park to learn how to dirt jump in my mid-30s. I picked up a cheap used dirt jumper, a 2014 Norco Two50, and the bike definitely makes it easier to carry momentum and to pop compared to my 29er Chromag Primer, but I find it twitchy and scary. I actually ate it pedalling into a jump - I find I need to be pretty attentive to avoid the speed wobbles.

    Looking at the geo chart, dirt jumpers do not seem to have changed much over the years. I know there are some bikes that are now longer, but my bike is definitely in the range of what is currently available.

    Is the small bike something I will eventually get used to, or should I be looking for something newer/longer to give me more confidence to progress? Any setup tips to make the bike more forgiving (e.g. cockpit, tire pressure)?

    The geo chart for my bike is here, and Iím riding the longer size. The build is pretty much stock except Iíve swapped in a 40 mm stem and 50 mm rise, 760 mm width bars rather than the super high, goofy BMX-like cockpit that came on the bike.
    https://www.norco.com/bike-archives/2014/two50/

    Of course, I expect that learning to dirt jump will take time, and I am sure I will improve. I am mainly asking if I have made the process more difficult with the bike I got.
    Last edited by D(C); 01-01-2022 at 09:42 AM.

  15. #6640
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    In a van... down by the river
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    9,805
    Quote Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
    As a result of a wet fall and now a blanketing of snow in southwestern BC, I have been heading to the indoor dirt jump park to learn how to dirt jump in my mid-30s.
    You wanna fuck yourself up good? Because that's how you fuck yourself up good.


  16. #6641
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    11,792
    Quote Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
    As a result of a wet fall and now a blanketing of snow in southwestern BC, I have been heading to the indoor dirt jump park to learn how to dirt jump in my mid-30s. I picked up a cheap used dirt jumper, a 2014 Norco Two50, and the bike definitely makes it easier to carry momentum and to pop compared to my 29er Chromag Primer, but I find it twitchy and scary. I actually ate it pedalling into a jump - I find I need to be pretty attentive to avoid the speed wobbles.

    Looking at the geo chart, dirt jumpers do not seem to have changed much over the years. I know there are some bikes that are now longer, but my bike is definitely in the range of what is currently available.

    Is the small bike something I will eventually get used to, or should I be looking for something newer/longer to give me more confidence to progress? Any setup tips to make the bike more forgiving (e.g. cockpit, tire pressure)?

    The geo chart for my bike is here, and Iím riding the longer size. The build is pretty much stock except Iíve swapped in a 40 mm stem and 50 mm rise, 760 mm width bars rather than the super high, goofy BMX-like cockpit that came on the bike.
    https://www.norco.com/bike-archives/2014/two50/

    Of course, I expect that learning to dirt jump will take time, and I am sure I will improve. I am mainly asking if I have made the process more difficult with the bike I got.
    All the geometry changes to trail bikes over the last decade have been in pursuit of stability. But dirt jumpers are built with whipping and spinning in mind, so stability is kind of the opposite of what you want.

    If you ride it enough, you'll get used to it. It'll always take a little adjustment when switching back and forth between bikes though.

  17. #6642
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    North Van
    Posts
    3,595
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    All the geometry changes to trail bikes over the last decade have been in pursuit of stability. But dirt jumpers are built with whipping and spinning in mind, so stability is kind of the opposite of what you want.

    If you ride it enough, you'll get used to it. It'll always take a little adjustment when switching back and forth between bikes though.
    Thanks for the reassurance that Iíll get used to it. I am a ways away from anything resembling stylish; just trying to get more comfortable on some proper sized jumps.

  18. #6643
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,140

    Ask the experts

    Few rides on mine (see above) and so far feels pretty good. Did steal hydros that were intended for my 8 y/oís bike for this. Iím going running front brake as well bc Iím not doing any intentional bar spins and better for all around use riding around hood and w my kids


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    Last edited by VTskibum; 01-01-2022 at 08:14 PM.

  19. #6644
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    606
    that norco is a little short on reach, but has a 20mm drop bb so should still feel fairly stable
    imo taller bars really help a dj feel larger, it spaces your contact points out more and gives arms room to stretch out and not be bunched up in the cockpit, fwiw i run ns districts on 2 bikes and love them

    assuming coming from mtb background the common struggle when learning to dj is riding all the way up the steeper lips
    on an mtb you try to jump FURTHER over the jump
    on a dj you are trying to jump HIGHER over the jump
    the goal and mindset is different, which makes the technique different

    on a mtb you do more of a bunny hop, on a dj you do more of a j hop
    on an mtb when your front wheel leaves dirt your rear is close behind it, the jump is more of a wedge shape
    on a dj when your front wheel leaves the lip you want your rear wheel to continue the rest of the way up and ride all the way off the lip as well, the jump is steeper and more of a radius with lip

    for practice find a set of good rollers
    go slow over them and pump hard up and down
    then try jumping over one in that same pumping motion
    go as slow as you can and j hop the roller as clean as you can
    now go fast and realize just how much you were previously sucking up the lip and bmx racer styling the jump

    when you see someone go super slow but boost to the moon this is what they are doing
    when you go fast and cant clear the jump its because you are bunny hopping over the top half of the lip
    when you get it right and j hop a steep dj lip you boost up high while pulling back on bars and pushing into lip with feet, then fly up and find the stalling point, then you push forward and dive aggressively into the landing front wheel first

    its a very deliberate 3 part motion
    up
    stall
    down
    the bigger the jump and more airtime, the slower those pieces link together and you have to slow down your movements to align with them

    if you dont slow down that is when you take the upward momentum directly into the forward diving into the landing momentum, and then you go over the bars and break shit... dont do that

    work on separating the upward, finding the stall point, then purposefully pushing the front end down into the landing for a smooth clean transition

    enough rambling... go practice, take vids of yourself, you wont be doing what you think you are doing, so fix it and stop sucking up the lip, which is what 99.9% of us do

  20. #6645
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    North Van
    Posts
    3,595
    ^^^
    This is helpful advice. I agree. In some videos I took of myself on the small set, my rear wheel is definitely leaving the lip earlier than it should.

    Re: my Norcoís geometry, the 400ish reach still seems somewhat common, with the exception of some longer bikes like the Transition and some others. The 69.5 deg head angle is in range, though definitely on the steeper end, and results in a wheelbase that is shorter than some other bikes.

  21. #6646
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,140
    Definitely is helpful, and spot on re not using the whole lip. Took my DJ to the pumptrack w my daughter today and definitely found it easier to manual than my 29er HT but still not much better at jumping, despite being able to j-hop it pretty well on flat ground. Think itís all practice


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  22. #6647
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    NorCal coast
    Posts
    1,239
    I got a Commencal DJ last year because the county is supposed to be building a pumptrack at the park by my house. That's stalled until this spring, but I have messed around on some other stuff. I can't jump for shit still, but since I ride MTB 99.9% of the time, I really wish I'd gotten the biggest Transition frame available instead, just to have reach closer to what I'm used to. The DJ feels so fucking short and twitchy and weird every time I get on it.

  23. #6648
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    7,033
    I lost my mind yesterday trying to mount a toobless DHR 650b on my Bronson. I've been toobless for a fairly long time now...maybe 10yrs...and have never struggled this much.

    I did everything I knew how to do and could not get it to take. The beads would not separate for the life of me to get the air in. It was fairly cold initially, but I warmed up the tire afterwards and still to no avail.

    Air compressor.
    Pulled the core.
    Wrapped a line around the center of the tire.
    Toobed it and set one side.

    Now it's just sitting fully toobed in the warm basement and I'm hoping that will tweak the tire enough and make the beads find their home!

    wtf?

  24. #6649
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,140
    Soapy water on the rim bed and tire beads can definitely help as well. Good luck, have had some combos that are just a PITA over the years, but almost always could get them to seal w some persistence


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  25. #6650
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    BC to CO
    Posts
    4,137
    If I don't succeed on my 3rd attempt I use a CO2 canister, the forceful blast usually seats the tire. It helps that I have a case of CO2s sitting in my garage.

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