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Thread: Ask the experts

  1. #6476
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skistack View Post
    OK, how do I make a Kinetic trainer though axle adapter work with the hanger on a Salsa Warbird? The hanger is held in place by an axle stud cap nut, but the adapter won't fit through the 8mm hex opening on the nut -


    Attachment 392449

    I could drill out the nut enough for the adapter to pass through, but then tightening / removing the nut becomes an issue. Seem like a collar that protrudes past the frame and fits both over the axle stud and inside the frame hole would allow the nut on the adapter to hold the hanger in place? Shirley this has been solved somewhere?
    Do the threads on the "short axle stud" stick out past the frame? Could you just rustle up an appropriately sized nut with external wrench flats?

  2. #6477
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    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    Do the threads on the "short axle stud" stick out past the frame? Could you just rustle up an appropriately sized nut with external wrench flats?
    No, they're inset. Will check out Robert Axle Project, thanks Noonan!

  3. #6478
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  4. #6479
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    Got it.

    I guess Iím partially wondering for future trips as well. Iíll stick with normal tires for this one. Iím looking at a long route in Norway next year or a Vancouver Island trip. Both would mixed dirt and paved, with a little single track. I subscribe to the normal logic that a 2.35 is normally faster than a 2.2 ish tire on singletrack but I really start to wonder about firmer surfaces (pavement) if a 2.35 with tread starts to generate more rolling resistance. I just have not bothered to buy anything narrow in so many years that I donít have a comparison point.

    Quote Originally Posted by MegaStoke View Post
    White rim isnít a good ride to push into narrower tires due to some of the sandy sections. Vittoria Mezcal 2.35 or something similar will be plenty fast rolling.

  5. #6480
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    My wife bought a Ripmo AF last year and has really gotten into maintaining it and is now taking care of a couple of her girlfriend's bikes too. We've got a cheapo Shimano bleed kit that has done alright but recently she's been having issues with the tubing slipping off the plunger or the caliper. Does anyone have a suggestion for a nicer bleed kit that is compatible with Shimano?

    Dee I'm figuring you've got something cool in that magic tool box of yours.

    Edit: After poking around online it looks like there is the absurdly priced Park Tool kit. Park sells parts so for $27 I could get their syringe and hose assembly without all of the adaptors and bleed blocks. Anyone have any experience with that and it's durability?
    Last edited by John_B; 11-13-2021 at 12:02 PM.

  6. #6481
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    I have the same bleed kit.

    Are you sure the plastic Ďbeadí is being pushed all the way onto the bleed port? This takes some force but once itís on and the sliding Ďlever thingí is behind it Iíve never had issues. I think a lot of people press until the bead is near but not on top of the bleed port, at which point it would slip off really easily.

    You can also do a directional one way bleed using only the funnel and no plunger. This works quite a bit better but is messy.

    Quote Originally Posted by John_B View Post
    My wife bought a Ripmo AF last year and has really gotten into maintaining it and is now taking care of a couple of her girlfriend's bikes too. We've got a cheapo Shimano bleed kit that has done alright but recently she's been having issues with the tubing slipping off the plunger or the caliper. Does anyone have a suggestion for a nicer bleed kit that is compatible with Shimano?

    Dee I'm figuring you've got something cool in that magic tool box of yours.

    Edit: After poking around online it looks like there is the absurdly priced Park Tool kit. Park sells parts so for $27 I could get their syringe and hose assembly without all of the adaptors and bleed blocks. Anyone have any experience with that and it's durability?

  7. #6482
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tailwind View Post
    I have the same bleed kit.

    Are you sure the plastic ‘bead’ is being pushed all the way onto the bleed port? This takes some force but once it’s on and the sliding ‘lever thing’ is behind it I’ve never had issues. I think a lot of people press until the bead is near but not on top of the bleed port, at which point it would slip off really easily.

    You can also do a directional one way bleed using only the funnel and no plunger. This works quite a bit better but is messy.
    Good points. I bet she hasn't been sliding the "lever thing" down

  8. #6483
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    A presta nut works really well for that too.
    Trimming the end of the hose at the plunger side will work a few times until the hose gets too short


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  9. #6484
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    So, I've gotten more into maintaining my own rig whenever I have the time to. With winter coming up I'd like to service my shock and fork. I'm looking at a $200-$300 investment in tools and supplies to get started (plungers, oils, torque wrench (I know I need that already), service kits, etc). Our fleet has a mix of Rockshox and Fox stuff, so I'll need a few different things as well.

    Question is, should I just jump in or still give that piece to the local shops. It'll be 2-5 services before I pay off for my investment... Is there anything meditative about this piece of the maintenance? Bleeding and adjusting derailleurs and stuff I find that way.
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  10. #6485
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    How many mags have mulleted a previously 29/29 bike? I donít need to be faster, but I am genuinely curious how Iíd like the change in handling characteristics.

    I see that WRP makes an aftermarket linkage yoke for the 20/21 spec enduro to run in mullet mode and regain some of the stock geometry. It ainít cheap, especially for what it is, but as far as I can tell itís the only aftermarket part for made for this.

    Seriously considering having a 27.5 wheel built up and trying the mullet out for next season.

  11. #6486
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    I tried it with a Guerilla Gravity Smash. It was slower and didn't handle any better. I still ride a 69er and that bike handles noticably better than a 29er hardtail.

  12. #6487
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    Quote Originally Posted by east or bust View Post
    How many mags have mulleted a previously 29/29 bike? I don’t need to be faster, but I am genuinely curious how I’d like the change in handling characteristics.

    I see that WRP makes an aftermarket linkage yoke for the 20/21 spec enduro to run in mullet mode and regain some of the stock geometry. It ain’t cheap, especially for what it is, but as far as I can tell it’s the only aftermarket part for made for this.

    Seriously considering having a 27.5 wheel built up and trying the mullet out for next season.
    I have. Simply slapping a 27.5 wheel on a 29er makes a very large change in the geometry. In almost every case, it makes some part of the geo kind of shitty. About the only way it'd still feel like a normal bike would be if it started at like 65 degree HT, 78 ST, and like 350+mm BB. Here's a handy little website that lets you plug in your bike's existing geometry, then change the wheelsize, fork travel, angleset, etc.: https://geo.syn.bike/

    Edit: quick & dirty changes for dropping in a 27.5 rear wheel on a 29 frame: -1 degree HT, -1 degree ST, -9mm BB height
    You'd want to start in "high" mode for sure.

    When I did this on a Sentinel, it got ridiculously slack (like 63 degrees) with a really low BB (like 330mm). I pedal struck everything and it took a lot more work to turn. But when I did it on a bike that facilitates it better (Megatrail with short headset cup & 160mm 29er fork), geometry stays normal and it rides great.

  13. #6488
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    Forum Cross Pollinator, gratuitously strident

  14. #6489
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    Quote Originally Posted by grskier View Post
    So, I've gotten more into maintaining my own rig whenever I have the time to. With winter coming up I'd like to service my shock and fork. I'm looking at a $200-$300 investment in tools and supplies to get started (plungers, oils, torque wrench (I know I need that already), service kits, etc). Our fleet has a mix of Rockshox and Fox stuff, so I'll need a few different things as well.

    Question is, should I just jump in or still give that piece to the local shops. It'll be 2-5 services before I pay off for my investment... Is there anything meditative about this piece of the maintenance? Bleeding and adjusting derailleurs and stuff I find that way.
    Sounds like you'd enjoy it. Most of the service is pretty easy on forks and especially rear shocks, but lately have been farming that out while busy. Derailleur adjustment in my sleep and brake bleeds still done at home generally for context.

  15. #6490
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    Man, I got bumped by mullet talk, so exotic

    Quote Originally Posted by VTskibum View Post
    Sounds like you'd enjoy it. Most of the service is pretty easy on forks and especially rear shocks, but lately have been farming that out while busy. Derailleur adjustment in my sleep and brake bleeds still done at home generally for context.

    Thanks, I now know what to ask santa for christmas.. tools and oil.... so exotic.
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  16. #6491
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    Quote Originally Posted by grskier View Post
    So, I've gotten more into maintaining my own rig whenever I have the time to. With winter coming up I'd like to service my shock and fork. I'm looking at a $200-$300 investment in tools and supplies to get started (plungers, oils, torque wrench (I know I need that already), service kits, etc). Our fleet has a mix of Rockshox and Fox stuff, so I'll need a few different things as well.

    Question is, should I just jump in or still give that piece to the local shops. It'll be 2-5 services before I pay off for my investment... Is there anything meditative about this piece of the maintenance? Bleeding and adjusting derailleurs and stuff I find that way.
    Agreed basic service of forks and shocks is pretty easy. I've done both RS and Fox and don't recall needing any special tools. Maybe a pick to help remove seals and o-rings, and a 24mm or other socket that has been grinded down to have a flat edge so it doesn't slip off when removing top caps.

    You'll save money doing basic services yourself and more importantly not have to wait if your local shops are as backed up as mine are. The only downside is there might be something wrong with a fork/shock that you might not notice that a shop would.

  17. #6492
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    Quote Originally Posted by grskier View Post
    Thanks, I now know what to ask santa for christmas.. tools and oil.... so exotic.
    Just keep in mind that you can only really do an air can service on rear shocks. Anything in the damper circuit will generally require equipment to recharge the IFP chamber with nitrogen. But yeah, fork service is pretty straightforward on most forks and full teardown is kind of fun in a "I hope I don't lose any of these small parts" kind of way.

  18. #6493
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    Yep, seals/wipers/oil/cleaning at regular intervals at home, any damper service or recharging, that's worth paying for. Lower cost investment and cheaper to do at home than having a shop do them for ~$50-100.

    I started doing basic tunes and fork/rear shock services at home last summer for friends and coworkers. was charging $30-40 with seals for a fork/rear shock, helped offset the costs.
    "If we can't bring the mountain to the party, let's bring the PARTY to the MOUNTAIN!"

  19. #6494
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    Last winter, I was coil-curious and bought a cheap secondhand Cane Creek DB Coil CS for my Norco Sight 29 to see if I liked it. My plan was to invest in a more expensive shock if I did. The coil shock turned out the be excellent on my bike, and I haven't had any complaints with the shock and kept running it all season. It has been reliable and has performed well.

    The DB Coil design has been around for a long time, which makes me wonder if I'm missing anything by not going with something more current. Is there any reason to stick with my original plan of spending more on my shock, or should I keep running the Cane Creek?

    The OCD in me is a bit bothered that I am running a Rockshox fork and Cane Creek shock, but that's a me problem.

  20. #6495
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    Quote Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
    Last winter, I was coil-curious and bought a cheap secondhand Cane Creek DB Coil CS for my Norco Sight 29 to see if I liked it. My plan was to invest in a more expensive shock if I did. The coil shock turned out the be excellent on my bike, and I haven't had any complaints with the shock and kept running it all season. It has been reliable and has performed well.

    The DB Coil design has been around for a long time, which makes me wonder if I'm missing anything by not going with something more current. Is there any reason to stick with my original plan of spending more on my shock, or should I keep running the Cane Creek?

    The OCD in me is a bit bothered that I am running a Rockshox fork and Cane Creek shock, but that's a me problem.
    I wouldn't bother blowing more $$ if you like it - I ran a coil DB Inline coil on an old Reign and really liked that shock on that bike. Never felt the need to get anything spendier...

  21. #6496
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    Somebody recommend me a full-face helmet for long backcountry rides and other long uphills with spicy downhills (strap the helmet to my pack and ride 5000 ft up a forest road then rip single track down) Maybe 2-3 bike park days a year.

    Kicker is I need a long oval shape and Gigantic size (7-5/8 hat size or 62cm). Lids from Leatt and Smith in XL crush my forehead because theyíre shaped for you round eggheads.

    I wear a Troy Lee A1 normally and have looked at the Stage but a little scared of how lightweight it seems.

  22. #6497
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    Feb 2014
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    I've got a huge head for my size (size XL/XXL Stage, but only 5'8" and wear size medium everything else). My head is pretty oval, and is a bit over 59.5cm. I wear it with the thickest neck and cheek pads. I couldn't even get the M/L onto my head even without pads. The XL is very comfortable to me. I just hang it on the handlebars on fire road climbs, but I'm usually doing 1k yoyos, so I could see hanging it on the pack if it was longer than that.

    I don't own a full on DH helmet to compare, but I think the main place they're saving weight is on the chinbar (very open) and maybe a little bit thinner outer shell. It's held up great for me though over 2+ years. I just replaced it with a new one out of an abundance of caution after I OTB'd into a tree. There's a faint dent in the shell but otherwise you couldn't tell anything happened.

  23. #6498
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon3 View Post
    Somebody recommend me a full-face helmet for long backcountry rides and other long uphills with spicy downhills (strap the helmet to my pack and ride 5000 ft up a forest road then rip single track down) Maybe 2-3 bike park days a year.

    Kicker is I need a long oval shape and Gigantic size (7-5/8 hat size or 62cm). Lids from Leatt and Smith in XL crush my forehead because theyíre shaped for you round eggheads.

    I wear a Troy Lee A1 normally and have looked at the Stage but a little scared of how lightweight it seems.
    Are all the Leatts similar in fit? I've got a long oval head that's only slightly smaller, and I find the MTB 4.0 in an XL to be comfortable. I thought that at least one of their models offered an XXL, but I may be misremembering.

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  24. #6499
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon3 View Post
    Somebody recommend me a full-face helmet for long backcountry rides and other long uphills with spicy downhills (strap the helmet to my pack and ride 5000 ft up a forest road then rip single track down) Maybe 2-3 bike park days a year.

    Kicker is I need a long oval shape and Gigantic size (7-5/8 hat size or 62cm). Lids from Leatt and Smith in XL crush my forehead because theyíre shaped for you round eggheads.

    I wear a Troy Lee A1 normally and have looked at the Stage but a little scared of how lightweight it seems.
    Long oval head = giro. No idea if their XL sizes will fit your enormous melon. The switchblade might be a good option for you though.

  25. #6500
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon3 View Post
    Somebody recommend me a full-face helmet for long backcountry rides and other long uphills with spicy downhills (strap the helmet to my pack and ride 5000 ft up a forest road then rip single track down) Maybe 2-3 bike park days a year.

    Kicker is I need a long oval shape and Gigantic size (7-5/8 hat size or 62cm). Lids from Leatt and Smith in XL crush my forehead because theyíre shaped for you round eggheads.

    I wear a Troy Lee A1 normally and have looked at the Stage but a little scared of how lightweight it seems.
    Troy Lee makes a full face. But I am not an expert.

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