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Thread: Ask the experts

  1. #4926
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Evergreen Co
    Posts
    613
    I have not ridden all of the recent crop of forks and I’m looking for 140-150mm travel 29’er fork to replace my wife’s Fox 34 (2018 spec, grip damper). I’m wondering what people like for lighter riders these days that will be most conducive to good small bump compliance and hopefully linear enough she can use mos rod the travel. Kitted she’s probably 115lbs.

    I’m wondering about a pike ultimate or getting a fox 36 and sending it off to Push. Any thoughts on what seems to work well for lighter riders in this class?

    Ideally looking used if someone has something hanging out…

  2. #4927
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    NorCal coast
    Posts
    1,069
    The last couple rides, my rear MT7 started suddenly deteriorating until it would randomly pull to the bar, despite being bled a week prior. I did a full bleed again, and didn't observe any bubbles (used a very large bottom syringe and probably pushed ~40cc worth of oil through the system). However, the oil was dark black, and I also noticed that half the caliper pistons are very sticky. The brake is a couple years old, and I'm the second owner.

    I did some searching, and it doesn't look like there are any service kits or service manuals for replacing piston seals at both the caliper and MC. Is that correct? Basically, once they deteriorate to a certain point, they're done?

  3. #4928
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Central VT
    Posts
    4,581

    Ask the experts

    Full confession: Iíve been using Park Tool grease on my XT 12 speed der. clutch and itís always shifted like a champ.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  4. #4929
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    6,122
    Quote Originally Posted by HankScorpio View Post
    Full confession: Iíve been using Park Tool grease on my XT 12 speed der. clutch and itís always shifted like a champ.
    Most of the time the biggest reason to use the "right" grease is to avoid mixing incompatible greases. Match the viscosity and maybe the temperature range and you will usually get similar performance. But if you happen to put the wrong two greases together you might get reactions. Some combos make a horrible sticky paste.

    Did you clean out the original stuff super well? If you know for sure you didn't, that would be a nice endorsement for the Park stuff.
    A woman came up to me and said "I'd like to poison your mind
    with wrong ideas that appeal to you, though I am not unkind."

  5. #4930
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    240
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    One could read the specs and see what type of grease it is
    SDS:
    https://si.shimano.com/api/publish/s...06-ENG-CLP.pdf

    https://si.shimano.com/api/publish/s...08-ENG-GHS.pdf

    It’s a Calcium Sulfonate Complex grease, synthetic base oils, and additives. Doesn’t sound like a run of the mill grease, and I’m sure they must have had a reason to spec that grease instead of using something like their ‘Shimano Special Grease’ which is a more run of the mill Calcium Sulfonate grease.

    ETA: This is most definitely not the same grease as the current ‘internal hub’ grease

  6. #4931
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    NorCal coast
    Posts
    1,069
    FYI, for the 6 months or so that I owned an XTR 12, I mistakenly used the "Shimano Special Grease." The original grease was wearing thin after like 100 miles. The Special Grease seemed to last about as long.

  7. #4932
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Central VT
    Posts
    4,581
    Quote Originally Posted by jono View Post
    Most of the time the biggest reason to use the "right" grease is to avoid mixing incompatible greases. Match the viscosity and maybe the temperature range and you will usually get similar performance. But if you happen to put the wrong two greases together you might get reactions. Some combos make a horrible sticky paste.

    Did you clean out the original stuff super well? If you know for sure you didn't, that would be a nice endorsement for the Park stuff.
    Yeah. Every time I service the clutch it comes completely apart and it gets a good clean before grease and reassembly. The Park grease seems last a while in there.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  8. #4933
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Pagosa Springs CO
    Posts
    773
    When the valve gets goobied up w/ sealant do you clean it or just replace the core when you revive the sealant?

  9. #4934
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    BC to CO
    Posts
    3,629
    I like to replace valve cores often. They are less than a dollar a piece when you buy a 10+ pack.
    If you have them on hand you'll use them often, or be less likely to break a valve head off if you actually have spares.

  10. #4935
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,068
    I replace the core each year. Like others had said, cheap and easy.

    My OCD also makes me store my bike with the stem down. I told myself that if it was at the top of the tire (in storage), it would allow Stans to drip to the core as the low point and contribute to blockage.

  11. #4936
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    3,770
    Don't fall for this bullshit when buying them like 100s of buyers did

    https://www.amazon.com/Stans-No-Tube...dp/B0026B52MW/

    You get one valve not 50

  12. #4937
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    10,950
    What the hell are you guys doing that requires replacing valve cores so often?

    I think I've replaced like 5 in my whole life.

  13. #4938
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    3,770
    The same reason people have massive Stan's boogers in their tires. Too much sealant. The tubulars on my CX bike probably suffer from that as well.

  14. #4939
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Park City
    Posts
    1,571
    Some clutch grease education.
    Slick honey rated to 250’F
    Most high temp water proof grease. Rated to 560’ F.
    Some synthetic grease 1000’f.

    I think as long as your hitting 560 or above, and not mixing you’re good. I put on 1000’ this service.

    Yes, I reviewed and looked at this after this issue. I had all three types of my grease in the garage already do to car shit.

  15. #4940
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    25,042
    well how often are you servicing spragg clutches and what grease does a spragg clutch need ?
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  16. #4941
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    In a van... down by the river
    Posts
    8,303
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    What the hell are you guys doing that requires replacing valve cores so often?

    I think I've replaced like 5 in my whole life.
    Name:  imwithstupid.jpg
Views: 361
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  17. #4942
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    6,438
    Is this a reason to go with Sram? I've never had to do anything to my derailleurs. Well, adjust the B-gap screw.

  18. #4943
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    3,770
    Shimano don't care about mountain biking. Ebikes and gravel are their focus. If you buy one of their high end clutch derailleurs, chains or pedals don't expect it to last very long. You are paying for weight reduction not Durability.

  19. #4944
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    BC to CO
    Posts
    3,629
    Quote Originally Posted by Canada1 View Post
    Some clutch grease education.
    Slick honey rated to 250’F
    Most high temp water proof grease. Rated to 560’ F.
    Some synthetic grease 1000’f.
    I think as long as your hitting 560 or above, and not mixing you’re good. I put on 1000’ this service.
    Yes, I reviewed and looked at this after this issue. I had all three types of my grease in the garage already do to car shit.
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    well how often are you servicing spragg clutches and what grease does a spragg clutch need ?
    The actual spragg clutch mechanism is not what needs to be serviced/lubricated. The internals of the spragg clutch are lubricated in the factory with a light oil, it's the outer housing of the clutch and the tension band that encompasses the clutch housing that needs to be lubed.
    The spragg clutch controls the speed of the derailleur arm pivoting backwards. This is not adjustable, the clutch is set to a predetermined value to control the speed of the pivot, and is fixed.
    The tension band controls the movement of the derailleur arm pivoting forward. When the arm wants to move forward, the derailleur arm pivot and clutch housing rotates forward within the tension band. This tension band can be adjusted to increase or reduce the friction/speed of the derailleur arm pivoting forward, it's this interface between the tension band and clutch housing where the lubrication is needed.
    Another way to picture it, its like a freehub, the inner clutch spins in one direction, and the whole housing spins in the opposite direction.
    Also the tension band pressure can also be reduced by turning off the switch on the the outside of the derailleur.

  20. #4945
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Donner Summit
    Posts
    1,047
    Quote Originally Posted by Cocximus View Post
    My rear dropouts have these rear facing threaded holes. What are they for? Bike is a litespeed t5g.
    Mounts for a fender or a light rack. Should fit something like this: https://www.modernbike.com/product-2126260362

  21. #4946
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,844
    Thanks. I found Trek also has those. So no saddle bags with my electrician tools. My full toolkit weights under 50lbs. I don't haul it everyday, but I get the occasional service call or location change. Hopefully Milwaukee will come out with a carbon fiber edition.

    I am trying to figure out why it is so hard to find thru-axles with M5 threads at the end. Robert axle has one for a specific rack that is way too overbuilt for my needs. Specialized makes a simple axle with M5 threads. I am waiting for them to get back to me with details on what thread the axle has. Other option I considered is just using a hex key axle and running a qr skewer through it. That might be the best since I could use my pinhead locking skewers.

  22. #4947
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,138
    Quote Originally Posted by Tailwind View Post
    I have not ridden all of the recent crop of forks and Iím looking for 140-150mm travel 29íer fork to replace my wifeís Fox 34 (2018 spec, grip damper). Iím wondering what people like for lighter riders these days that will be most conducive to good small bump compliance and hopefully linear enough she can use mos rod the travel. Kitted sheís probably 115lbs.

    Iím wondering about a pike ultimate or getting a fox 36 and sending it off to Push. Any thoughts on what seems to work well for lighter riders in this class?

    Ideally looking used if someone has something hanging outÖ
    I really liked the Manitou Mattoc MY21 that preceded my Mezzer. Small bump compliance was excellent. It topped out at 140mm and I needed a little more to balance out my bike (hence the Mezzer).

    A friend of mine locally has highly recommended the MRP ribbon coil - especially for lighter riders. His wife is light and she really benefited from the coil due to the almost non-existent striction of the seals. I think that fork is a little heavier than an air fork like the pike, but as with everything, there is probably a trade-off.

    If it were me I would buy the Mattoc (if 140mm is sufficient) but I really like all of the suspension I've bought from Manitou (and all of the Hayes bicycle group). They produce excellent products and if there is an issue, their support is excellent.

    Seth

    Sent from my SM-N986U using Tapatalk

  23. #4948
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    slc
    Posts
    14,639
    Quote Originally Posted by sethschmautz View Post
    I think that fork is a little heavier than an air fork like the pike, but as with everything, there is probably a trade-off.
    Ribbon Coil 29 is ~300 g heavier than a Pike Ultimate 29.

    Agreed on the Mattoc recommendation. The Dorado IRT spring should be great for light riders. My kid's fork with IRT is awesome and he only weighs 60 lbs.

  24. #4949
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Evergreen Co
    Posts
    613
    I hadnít thought to look into Manitou but Iíll do some digging for sure. Iíve read enough good things in recent years. One thing I do like about the pike is that Iím really comfortable doing basic service. That being said, I canít imagine it would be much to learn. Iíll look into the Mattoc.

    I actually had a Ribbon Coil that I really liked. The only concern I have there is that the Ďextra softí spring may not be soft enough. I am 155 lbs and found that the soft spring felt pretty dialed. They recommend the extra soft for anyone under 145lbs so Iíve wondered if being on the light side of that would mitigate some of the coil benefit. Strong recommendation for anyone looking to check out the Ribbon though.

    Quote Originally Posted by sethschmautz View Post
    I really liked the Manitou Mattoc MY21 that preceded my Mezzer. Small bump compliance was excellent. It topped out at 140mm and I needed a little more to balance out my bike (hence the Mezzer).

    A friend of mine locally has highly recommended the MRP ribbon coil - especially for lighter riders. His wife is light and she really benefited from the coil due to the almost non-existent striction of the seals. I think that fork is a little heavier than an air fork like the pike, but as with everything, there is probably a trade-off.

    If it were me I would buy the Mattoc (if 140mm is sufficient) but I really like all of the suspension I've bought from Manitou (and all of the Hayes bicycle group). They produce excellent products and if there is an issue, their support is excellent.

    Seth

    Sent from my SM-N986U using Tapatalk

  25. #4950
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Mid-tomahawk
    Posts
    1,322
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    There's a 95% chance it'll be fine because the various tire sealants aren't really all that different.

    But there's a 5% chance it'll form mustard gas and your whole neighborhood will have to evacuate.
    Having tried this a couple of days ago (in Toast's house, to avoid mustard gassing my own place) I can confirm that nothing happened and it worked fine.

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