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  1. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Eburg
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    12,900
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    you gona tell me that ^^ was done by a moth ?
    Unless those holes resulted from a scrape or puncture, it's quite possible those holes propagated from moth holes and/or the fabric was weakened by moths. Or maybe they are shit fabric.

    Anyway, my comment about moth holes was about woven flannel -- specifically, Pendleton -- shirts, which are woven flannel, not knit merino wool. My bud shops thrift stores for Pendleton shirts. He has scored some 20 and 30 y.o. shirts, all well worn but all remarkably intact, except for some moth holes. I've patched several moth holes for him.

    ETA: There are some very tough wool weaves, e.g., gabardine and whipcord. A pair of Filson whipcord pants can last a lifetime -- IF you keep moths away from it.

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Vinyl Valley
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    1,037
    Quote Originally Posted by whyturn View Post
    So the merino 400 weight I have are Minus 33 Katmai expedition and they are probably the warmest I currently have from the 15 I’ve tried


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    The Minus 33 is what I was going to recommend. Nano air pants sound good, but is there a fly for your junk or do you need to drop trou?

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
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    17,987
    Quote Originally Posted by GeezerSteve View Post
    Unless those holes resulted from a scrape or puncture, it's quite possible those holes propagated from moth holes and/or the fabric was weakened by moths. Or maybe they are shit fabric.

    Anyway, my comment about moth holes was about woven flannel -.
    I'm talkin about all the most popular brands yer smart wool yer icebreaker and some obscure brands in lighter base layer weights that any dentist would be caught dead wearing

    A hole in the cuff of a 200 weight icebreaker from a watch which didn't happen with any other shirts for fucks sake ...gimme a break
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Shuswap Highlands
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    2,336
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    I'm talkin about all the most popular brands yer smart wool yer icebreaker and some obscure brands in lighter base layer weights that any dentist would be caught dead wearing , a hole in the cuff of a 200 weight icebreaker from a watch for fucks sake ...gimme a break
    No idea if moths are your issue, or if you have some kind of acid sweat, but I wear 200weight merino for work and play, and it takes about 2yrs of regular wear to start getting wear holes and runs in the fabric. Polypro does last much longer, but 3yrs of no stink wear out of merino is fine by me.
    Now that LL Bean has an outlet in Canada, I really want to get a couple pairs of nice medium weight whipcord wool pants. My military surplus wool pants are too heavy for all but the coldest days. Filson pants are great, but with the exchange, the cost just doesn't justify the wear.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
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    17,987
    my good man I do not sweat ... I perspire
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Aloft
    Posts
    3,347
    I agree with xxx. Wool is great and all but does not hold up as a baselayer. Every piece I have from underwear to shirts (besides my pendelton fannels) has wear holes in it. Many different brands too.

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Shuswap Highlands
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    2,336
    Are you guys washing your wool with the carharts on brutal cycle, then throwing into the drier? I'm no handwasher, but merino goes with the stanfield, on the gentle cycle, then line dry. I've got baselayer merino pants that are 4 cold seasons old and not a single run yet.

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Golden B.C.
    Posts
    258
    Check out arxteryx axiom knicker. Got a pair for my lady and she uses them on cold ski hill days.

    I got a pair of the orthovox piz boe shorts. Weird euro name but they have been awesome. Merino wool insulated shorts with full side zips. Make cold days at the hill, starts of ski tours and ripping down logging roads on sleds much more enjoyable. Easy to remove when your warmed up and pack very small.

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    559
    Quote Originally Posted by Undertow View Post
    Why, this is a different direction but I ended up with Haglofs Barrier knee pant... I ski in either Strafe bibs or Patty Untracked which are both uninsulated... I tried everything from fleece pants to polar base layers and for those really cold resort days the Haglofs have been an absolute home run...


    Sent from my SM-G955U using TGR Forums mobile app
    I'm totally down with the shorts-layer thing. In my case, these:

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    These are wool, with a little lycra in the weave. They come down to just above my knees.

    I bought those on a whim, thinking I'd only pull them out for super cold days. Much to my surprise, I quickly found myself wearing them pretty much every in-area skiing day for the last 2 seasons (with the exception of hot, sunny spring days). So far they are holding up perfectly well (they are not super thin, like merino layers I've had).

    They are freaking magic - super comfortable and non-bulky (slightly stretchy: form-fitting but not at all tight), to the point where I instantly forget I have them on. And they never, ever make me feel overheated (and I am sensitive to overheating whilst skiing - I'd rather be a little cold on the lifts all day than overheated at any point when hammering hard and sucking wind, which gets me all freaked out and claustrophobic). But they extend my comfort range dramatically if the day turns cold/windy (and snowy/icy charlift seats are utterly a non-issue).

    Best ski-clothing purchase I've made in a decade or two.

    So my lower-half rig these days is: capilene boxer briefs (to keep my junk from flopping around, and so I don't have to wash the wool shorts as often). Then the wool shorts. Then whatever weight, full-length long underwear is indicated for the day (I have like 5 different weights). Then shell pants (I can't imagine ever buying insulated pants, but obviously they work for some).

    So yeah, I highly recommend going the shorts route (I think > 1 layer of full-length lower base-layer would be totally sucky, bulk/movement/comfort/overheating-wise).

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    559
    Quote Originally Posted by skisurfmirth View Post
    Check out arxteryx axiom knicker. Got a pair for my lady and she uses them on cold ski hill days.

    I got a pair of the orthovox piz boe shorts. Weird euro name but they have been awesome. Merino wool insulated shorts with full side zips. Make cold days at the hill, starts of ski tours and ripping down logging roads on sleds much more enjoyable. Easy to remove when your warmed up and pack very small.
    Those axiom knickers look kind of bulky, as a mid-layer. And the price made me throw up a little in my mouth.

    But yeah...a shorts layer is surprisingly amazing.

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    norcal
    Posts
    1,255
    My ski bud who gets very cold despite being very in shape and strong skier swears by axioms knickers
    Life of a repo man is always intense.

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    NCW
    Posts
    2,062

    Fleece pant or other for skiing layer

    My thighs eat smart wool for breakfast.

    Patagonia nano-air-light pants and hooded pullover are my go-to midlayer these days. Warm when it’s cold, they breathe great, and have a heavier face fabric than the standard nano-air to resist pilling.


    Quote Originally Posted by WhetherMan View Post
    The nano air pants seem like exactly what you want.
    Assuming you hate money

    Don’t even wait for a sale on the pants, seriously that good. My only nitpick is that the OG pair I have had very tight cuffs, which I’ve pretty much stretched out at this point. Not sure if they’ve changed that design on the new ones.

    I also really like my expedition weight capilene onesie, but not as much as the nano-air-light pieces.

  13. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Rossland BC
    Posts
    1,091
    I’m still wearing Taiga fleece pants from the 90s. They’re going to outlast me. Taiga has always made simple, functional, absurdly durable gear without the slightest concession to current style/fashion.

  14. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    160
    I get cold fast when not moving, and my hill is short with slow lifts. I know the op was asking about layers under shell, but I’ve gone to wearing some old wool pants over my usual base layer(s)/shell. Think army surplus/duck hunting/telemarking. They’re big and heavy (suspenders needed) but I don’t really notice them skiing. On the lift they’re warmer than more/heavier layers under shell which get bulky and leave me with cold legs and swampy balls. Too hot for hike laps, but for short runs and slow lifts they work for me. And cheap.

  15. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Hokkaido
    Posts
    1,251
    I don't run as warm as I used to but not in your category. But on really cold ski days what I've been wearing is Uniqlo (Japanese clothing company) HeatTech mid length underwear as an additional layer on top of merino long underwear in various weights. Some HeatTech is available in US stores but not this particular product. Maybe you can order it...

    https://www.uniqlo.com/jp/store/goods/418794-08

    Another Uniqlo product that I own but is too warm for skiing is HeatTech fleece pants. Again, I don't see them on the US web site but my plan was to cut them off to just below the knee. Decided not to because I wouldn't wear them skiing. When I wear them out on a cold day in town I sweat. Really really warm.

    https://www.uniqlo.com/jp/store/goods/418930-32

    Uniqlo is very inexpensive, basic clothing that works. Their HeatTech fabric is significantly warmer than any other fabric I have worn. Too warm for me in most cases.

    I boiled my thermometer, and sure enough, this spot, which purported to be two thousand feet higher than the locality of the hotel, turned out to be nine thousand feet LOWER. Thus the fact was clearly demonstrated that, ABOVE A CERTAIN POINT, THE HIGHER A POINT SEEMS TO BE, THE LOWER IT ACTUALLY IS. Our ascent itself was a great achievement, but this contribution to science was an inconceivably greater matter.

    --MT--

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    5,548
    ^^^ive only seen cheap “fashion” uniqlo so it’s good to hear they have some sporting options.

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    7B Idaho
    Posts
    293
    I've been really impressed with the warmth and versatility of simple Polartec Powerstretch fleece tops (have 3 different Patagonia Piton tops). I think they would work great as a pants baselayer or midlayer, and looks like you can get some for $30 or less on Sierra Trading Post.

  18. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kilpisjärvi, Finland
    Posts
    805
    I work and skitour lots in very cold temps. -20c to -30c is quite normal here during mid winter. Coldest day I was working last winter was -38c (luckily not skiing).

    I first put on the good baselayer. I have underarmor, Helly Hansen etc.

    Then these https://www.svala.com/en/products/10...bottoms-black/ these are the best! These create much airpockets and let moisture escape to next layers. These are also kick ass things in warm spring and summer skiing, nice and cool under the shells. Looks bit dirty though

    After those two bottom layers I put one or some times two layers of fleece pants. Depends if I'm going to ski or do something less active.

    Then if I'm skiing, softshell pants without shell. If not skiing and sweating, then shell pants.

    Same applies to upper body. If do activities on cold, ditch the hard shells. If it's cold, it's not raining. Enough layers and no plastic bag on top, that will keep you warm.

    Lähetetty minun FIG-LX1 laitteesta Tapatalkilla

  19. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    47
    Quote Originally Posted by skis_the_trees View Post
    I've been really impressed with the warmth and versatility of simple Polartec Powerstretch fleece tops (have 3 different Patagonia Piton tops). I think they would work great as a pants baselayer or midlayer, and looks like you can get some for $30 or less on Sierra Trading Post.
    Same here. I have been using 3/4 Polartec Powerstretch base layer pants for several years and could not been happier.

  20. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Among Greatness All Around
    Posts
    5,161
    I don't know the weight (300??) of the "Exhibition" weight fleece pants I have. One pair like mentioned above by someone else came from STP. Kenyon, Terramar, and some others for brands Another pair came from a close out store (Polar brand) that are not quite as heavy. I also know that Russell has in the last few years had fleece heavy weight tops and bottoms that they have sold at Walmart. Sometimes you may also want to experiment with a thin very good wicking base layer (silk even maybe or wool) first and then the fleece or heavier layer over top of the thin layer.

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    in the shadow of the white rocks
    Posts
    1,494

  22. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    DownEast
    Posts
    260
    Maine Guide insulated wool pants... from the ski hill under shell pants to the suppah table with a few stops at the general store for "supplies" and to check in with the Bubs. Never out of place. Suspenders recommended a'la the Red Green Show. Treat yourself to a nice Chamois shirt as well. Done.

    https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/1117...rValue_0=Loden
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  23. #48
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    voting in seattle
    Posts
    4,036
    I don’t have a history of cold injury but generally agree with everyone calling for layering. I use capaline base layer, an equivalent to an R1 pant, and Arc’teryx atom LT pants, under shell bibs or pants. I can layer all three which will keep me comfortable down around -10F, if I’m not moving or it’s down in the -20F or colder I have some heavy weight puffy pants I put over everything.

  24. #49
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Sun Valley, ID
    Posts
    1,595
    Arcteryx atom lt pants. Or the military versions you can sometime find cheap called leaf I believe.

  25. #50
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,787
    arcteryx axino insulated knickers if not freezing is more important than some loss of movability (not a lot but some)
    what's orange and looks good on hippies?

    fire

    rails are for trains
    If I had a dollar for every time capitalism was blamed for problems caused by the government I'd be a rich fat film maker in a baseball hat.

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