Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    344

    Question for any Arborists or super smart tree people

    A car smashed into a very large corkscrew willow tree on my property. Tree is at least 40 years old. See here for reference, the tree in question is in the second picture.

    https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...ost+got+smoked

    The tree has a significant crack at the base, at most about two inches thick, roughly two feet high but possibly longer if it continues underground:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20190824_113521.jpg 
Views:	96 
Size:	1.56 MB 
ID:	294639


    My insurer sent a certified Arborist to inspect and report, and they say the crack "will cause rot and decay to the tree, leading to subsequent failure in the future."

    I assuming the arborist works for the same company that would get the job to take down the tree but could be mistaken.

    I really don't want to just chop this tree down. 6 years ago we had to take down three poplars, last summer we lost our Chinese Elm, and this is the last big tree we have. It survived two massive ice storms an the last ten years, the first reduced the entire thing down to about 6 - 8 feet high (from roughly 60 feet). Both times we were told (one guy was an arborist, the other I don't think was really an expert) that the tree wouldn't make it and here it is. Also without sounding dramatic I credit my being here to it, if this tree wasn't there, exactly in that spot, that night would have much much different.

    1 - Am I crazy to want to keep it up and monitor it a couple years?

    2 - can I assume I'll have visual indicators when the tree is dying / weakening ei leaves die, limbs start drying out etc, as opposed to a sudden catastrophic break?

    3 - is there anything I can do to help mitigate the damage ei fill the crack with something to slow down rot?

    Any help is greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    4,259
    Ask to get a second opinion on the tree because youíre interested in keeping it. See if the insurance will cover a second opinion consultation $$, ask how much $$ theyíll cover for the consultation and if you can independently solicit for the consultation, and see what you can find locally. Be present and ask a lot of questions when you have a visit for the second opinion.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    46,928
    Well they basically condemned/totaled the tree, which means they'll pay you for it. I doubt it means you have to cut it down. Get the check and see how it goes. Tree's probably toast but it might last a few years as it goes out. Maybe it'll make it if you get a smart tree guy trying to save it. In the meantime plant some new trees.

    edit: if for some wack reason they insist on cutting it down make sure they at least grind the stump way the fuck down, if not pull it. Make sure stump mitigation is in what they pay you, as well as replacement. Also there must be some recourse for loss in property value (I'd think).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    344
    Quote Originally Posted by bodywhomper View Post
    Ask to get a second opinion on the tree because you’re interested in keeping it. See if the insurance will cover a second opinion consultation $$, ask how much $$ they’ll cover for the consultation and if you can independently solicit for the consultation, and see what you can find locally. Be present and ask a lot of questions when you have a visit for the second opinion.
    That makes a lot of sense, and frankly I'm embarrassed I didn't think of that. Thank you, this is why I ask these questions.

    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    Well they basically condemned/totaled the tree, which means they'll pay you for it. I doubt it means you have to cut it down. Get the check and see how it goes. Tree's probably toast but it might last a few years as it goes out. Maybe it'll make it if you get a smart tree guy trying to save it. In the meantime plant some new trees.

    edit: if for some wack reason they insist on cutting it down make sure they at least grind the stump way the fuck down, if not pull it. editedit: make sure stump mitigation is in what they pay you. It's not enough for them to pay to cut it down, they have to deal with the stump (and any loss in property value I'd think).
    Yeah I've asked them to expand on 'tree removal' in regards to pulling out roots (doubt it) or grinding the stump down. As for the $$ they don't cut me a check, but would pay for their arborists people to remove the tree directly.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    46,928
    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    As for the $$ they don't cut me a check, but would pay for their arborists people to remove the tree directly.
    Why, though? Seems like a reasonable question to ask. You had a tree. Their customer killed it. You want the value of the tree. Why not?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    OREYGUN!
    Posts
    12,282
    Seems to me they should cut you the check to pay a arborist of your choice.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    11,813
    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    It survived two massive ice storms an the last ten years, the first reduced the entire thing down to about 6 - 8 feet high (from roughly 60 feet).
    despite your fondness for it, it sounds like a shit tree at this point

    plant some new ones along your fence line

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    OREYGUN!
    Posts
    12,282
    Sometimes trees heal, sometimes the rot. Is there anything it could fall on?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    10,811
    It sounds like you're dealing with your insurer, not the driver's insurer. Beyond the cost to remove a tree has significant value and you should be compensated for that by the driver or the driver's insurance, unless your insurer wants to pay you for the loss of the tree and then subrogate the claim to the driver's insurer.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    4,259
    Ask to replace the tree.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    709
    Trees are pretty resilient although it is a willow. My experience with arborists is the recommendation is always to cut down because they want to get paid for that.

    Get the insurance money (from the driver) of what it would cost to cut it down and then leave it...unless it could fall on the house, driveway, etc but I doubt it since willows need it really wet and thatís probably not where your house is built.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Big Sky/Moonlight Basin
    Posts
    9,559
    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    Well they basically condemned/totaled the tree, which means they'll pay you for it. I doubt it means you have to cut it down. Get the check and see how it goes.
    I just dealt with this exact issue last month. I am a joint owner of several family properties back in Wisconsin. 2 months ago a tornado flattened one of our houses, and another we own next door was damaged by a large tree limb. Said tree is an over 400 year old white pine. It is huge. Insurance adjuster said it has to come down. My cousins objected because we used to have a tire swing on it when we were kids. Adjuster pointed that now they have identified it as deficient, they won't cover any liability from the tree. So if another big branch lands on our roof, zero coverage. And more importantly, because it is so huge, if it actually fell it is easily in range of a neighbor's $1.5 mill home. And zero coverage from us. We would be screwed. Tree came down the next day.



    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    "Zee damn fat skis are ruining zee piste !" -Oscar Schevlin

    "Hike up your skirt and grow a dick you fucking crybaby" -what Bunion said to Harry at the top of The Headwaters

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    46,928
    400 years old is doubtful but whatever. Do something cool with the wood if you can.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Big Sky/Moonlight Basin
    Posts
    9,559

    Question for any Arborists or super smart tree people

    Google says white pines can live to 450. My granddaddy told me 400. He was a Methodist preacher.

    Update: wiki sez "some in Wisconsin are approximately 500 years old."
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinus_strobus


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    "Zee damn fat skis are ruining zee piste !" -Oscar Schevlin

    "Hike up your skirt and grow a dick you fucking crybaby" -what Bunion said to Harry at the top of The Headwaters

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    10,116
    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    A car smashed into a very large corkscrew willow tree on my property. Tree is at least 40 years old. See here for reference, the tree in question is in the second picture.

    https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...ost+got+smoked

    The tree has a significant crack at the base, at most about two inches thick, roughly two feet high but possibly longer if it continues underground:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20190824_113521.jpg 
Views:	96 
Size:	1.56 MB 
ID:	294639


    My insurer sent a certified Arborist to inspect and report, and they say the crack "will cause rot and decay to the tree, leading to subsequent failure in the future."

    I assuming the arborist works for the same company that would get the job to take down the tree but could be mistaken.

    I really don't want to just chop this tree down. 6 years ago we had to take down three poplars, last summer we lost our Chinese Elm, and this is the last big tree we have. It survived two massive ice storms an the last ten years, the first reduced the entire thing down to about 6 - 8 feet high (from roughly 60 feet). Both times we were told (one guy was an arborist, the other I don't think was really an expert) that the tree wouldn't make it and here it is. Also without sounding dramatic I credit my being here to it, if this tree wasn't there, exactly in that spot, that night would have much much different.

    1 - Am I crazy to want to keep it up and monitor it a couple years?

    2 - can I assume I'll have visual indicators when the tree is dying / weakening ei leaves die, limbs start drying out etc, as opposed to a sudden catastrophic break?

    3 - is there anything I can do to help mitigate the damage ei fill the crack with something to slow down rot?

    Any help is greatly appreciated.

    Not arborist or super smart or even a Tree Person, but....You can seal up as much of the wound as possible with tree tar, then pack it with concrete, or cement grout that will not swell and is not toxic. But you're likely past your window for that if this was the Bentley a couple months ago... But that crack can't heal itself.

    As for $$, in most places in the States court awards would be capped at 3x, possibly 5x "stumpage", the market value for the tree or a similar tree. It's likely entirely different in your town, in your province, in your country.
    A rational agent would come to terms with the fact that BentlyBoi killed the tree, and seek to not leave any $$ on the table as some compensation. You can't really be made whole in any subjective sense for "the tree that saved your ass"... Courts and attorneys know this, and tend to stick with objective criteria in these cases.

    Sorry mate. It looks like a friendly tree. But if it's a hazard your insurance won't cover anymore, you have good reason to do what you likely have to do.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Big in Japan
    Posts
    36,235
    I had a rambling rose of sharon tree split almost in half in my backyard about eight years ago after a pretty wet and heavy snowstorm. Loved that thing when in bloomed in August/ September. So, strapped it together and covered the exposed/ damaged surface with a rubbery sealant, forget the brand, and it's still alive today. Try something like that, nothing to lose.

    Let's do some livin'
    After, we die

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    valley of the heart's delight
    Posts
    624
    teh reddit has a section on tree law. Destroying large trees ain't cheap. ianal, but "stumpage" or the cost of a similar tree is often high (10k-100k or more). ... if a reddit circlejerk is believable.
    10/01/2012 Site was upgraded to 300 baud.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Big in Japan
    Posts
    36,235
    Yeah, when buying a house, one should pay serious attention to the trees on the property, and negotiate costs for care or removal, because most are shocked at the cost when they have to fork it out, and that's usually in an emergency.

    Let's do some livin'
    After, we die

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    none
    Posts
    6,301
    Corkscrew Willows and all willows in general, suck. Very messy, they break frequently, rot and the wood doesnít burn very well. They get so large and can be really expensive to remove.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •