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  1. #101
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    4,339
    Quote Originally Posted by dcpnz View Post
    So having had our model 3 for about 6 months now I can share some thoughts.

    The car itself is pretty darn amazing, fun to drive, really quiet, and fast.

    Range and range anxiety:
    Quite frankly simply a non-issue for the vast majority of usage. Just plug it in overnight whenever you feel its getting a bit low.
    Now that doesn't mean it's not a very real concern - we live in small mountain town so travel to the big city (Denver), to kids sports tournaments and over mountain passes fairly frequently. Many trips here are just not possible yet because the infrastructure doesn't exist off major highways. And if it's possible its somewhere between a logistical challenge and a huge pain in the a$$. Either plan to stop and wait at superchargers or find hotel with a charger and hope it's available when you need it. So far fast chargers have not been where we've needed to be and the range estimator sucks traveling in the mountains so the anxiety is real. Despite being by far the most efficient vehicle we have I'm rapidly realizing its just not practical for longer trips and will likely take the large gas guzzling ICE SUV most of the time.

    Charging/costs:
    We installed a chargepoint at home instead of the Tesla charger - went that way cos our electric utility gives the charger for free and I could piggy back existing wiring - Tesla charger would charge quicker but would have cost me extra $2k for wiring upgrade and actual charger.

    I get about 30mi range in an hour for about $1 in electricity at home and there's a few free chargers around town. I figure a comparable vehicle might get 30mi/gal in mixed driving and gas is about $3.50/gal here .


    Vehicle specific issues:
    I don't find the seats at all comfortable - yes they're highly adjustable, no it doesn't seem to matter. They're awful compared to recent Audi and Volvo seats we've had and i also prefer seats in our 'merican made vehicles too.

    I fricken hate the huge central touchscreen - it's distracting as heck, shit flashes when you pass something (whether that's another vehicle, a tree, a parked car). Something simple like changing a radio station is downright dangerous and requires taking eyes off road for too long and too many screen taps

    Muted mentioned the wipers - yeah they work fine most of the time but if you got anything on your windshield like pollen or sap (or likely snow/ice but i haven't had it in winter yet) they go bonkers and there's no manual control.

    Visibility is awful - rear view mirror is pretty useless, and the A pillar is really fat which creates a pedestrian and cross traffic blindspot. I guessed that's how they get safety and rigidity with glass roof

    Auto cruise control is scary - frequently jams on brakes for vehicles in adjacent lanes. No way I'm trusting autopilot if that's the best they can do. And makes me think full self driving is a long long way off.


    TLDR:
    Car is (mostly) awesome
    Range is fine for daily use but anxiety is real if you travel longer distances
    Not going to get rid of my gas burner yet but I would buy again in a heartbeat.
    Nice honest review.

    My little monitor died and the thing goes thru the reset mode constantly. Was driving me nuts, so I covered it up. When it gets fixed i might just keep it covered up.

    Had a Pollock and now this -

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Bottom feeding
    Posts
    7,141
    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover View Post
    That's not a factory rack, those are aftermarket feet and bars. They do fit the front to rear rails that are already there though.
    Duh.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Bottom feeding
    Posts
    7,141
    ~350 mile range with the big battery, (3 different batteries available).
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Your Mom's House
    Posts
    6,359
    Quote Originally Posted by plugboots View Post
    ~350 mile range with the big battery, (3 different batteries available).
    Yep - and it's not going to be available in the United States
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    All ye punterz! Leave thine stupid heavy skis in the past, or at least in the resort category, for the age of lightweight pussy sticks is upon us! Behold! Keep up with the randocommandos on their carbon blades of shortness! Break thine tibias into spiral splinters with pintech extravagance!

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    53
    Before I start in; rear wheel drive Model 3 long-range (rated at like 310 or 320 or 330mi, whatever Elon says this week) owner, about 20k miles in 16 months. I live in the bay.

    Quote Originally Posted by plugboots View Post
    Answer: A metric kilowatt shit ton. My 2 friends that have Teslas in the Bay Area do not take them to Tahoe. Typically another car is in all the stations they want to use, so...
    Quote Originally Posted by SkiCougar View Post
    my sisters father in law has a Tesla, he had to wait in no where's ville texas while it recharged on a trip from Houston to Austin and back with my sister and her son waiting with him, Austin is less than 200 miles from Houston.
    Meh. Now, understand, I specifically did NOT buy an AWD 3 because I don't want to get back into the world of having 2 sets of tires like I did with my Golf R, worrying about charging in the mountains where we don't have a garage, worrying about ground clearance, worrying about what the cold does to the range. Instead I bought a used diesel X5 for a ski car

    I have/had no plans to take the 3 to the mountains, although we've actually driven it up 3 times, and drove up a loaner Model S once. Kirkwood happens to have destination chargers so I just charged, for free, overnight, after arrival. Not totally convenient to have to leave the car 3/4mi away at the lodge; OTOH they were always open and worked and it cost $0, so it was worth the tradeoff vs bringing a different vehicle.

    FWIW, the ~190mi net uphill trip from sea level to 8k uses something like 250mi of range. You get it back on the way down, but that doesn't help if you run out of juice 2mi from the summit

    I've only supercharged the 3 like... 6 times? Some of those just for shits and giggles?
    Once or twice on a (summer) trip to Kirkwood, once on a trip to a dirtbike camp way out east of Fresno, ... once on a r/t to Sacto... my memory is failing me beyond that. But I've seen enough chargers and have enough familiarity with them from various family-owned cars that "typically another car is in all the stations they want to use" is hyperbole unless you're talking about some craptacular chargepoint at some restaurant in BFE that you're desperately hoping works. And this is why I think Tesla currently has a huge edge over the competition. Fast, trustworthy, reliable charging network. I wouldn't want to take anything else on an EV roadtrip *today*.

    Tesla: finds the chargers for you, routes to them, tells you when to stop, how many stalls are used, etc. Everyone else: download on app on your phone, good luck, bring a good book.

    I absolutely get that some people don't want to stop for 20 minutes along their route to charge, especially if they're doing it all the time. But I managed, my wife manages, my 80 year old dad manages. It's really not hard or time-consuming, assuming you don't have a crappy charging situation (eg, can't charge at home, take frequent long trips that are nowhere near chargers, whatever). If it doesn't suit you, don't buy an EV. For most of us, you take that trip maybe once or twice a year, it's probably worth the tradeoff.

    Let me put it this way: I've saved more time not stopping at gas stations than I've burned at superchargers. Every time I've had to stop along my route, I got my lunch/hit a grocery store to buy chips and salsa/found a starbucks+pisser, and I RUSHED back to the car because I realized I already had way more charge than I needed. They're bloody fast. It's not like a gas station. You don't charge 0-100. You arrive with something, because you left home with a lot, and you leave with a bit more than you arrived with.

    Quote Originally Posted by SkiCougar View Post
    if they were competitive with gas cars(AND WITHOUT SUBSIDIES); there would already be charging stations all over. Tesla would not be in business if the country wasn't helping to pay for the cars thru subsidies.
    Please, tell us more about the subsidies that the oil companies, refineries, and corn producers don't get. Tell us about how we don't spend trillions in foreign countries largely because of oil. Don't get me wrong, I didn't bring my figures, either. I don't know if ethanol refiners or gas stations get subsidies. And I'm sure power companies get some kinds of subsidies, too, even before you leave aside natural gas powered electric plants that of course benefit from similar subsidies as the oil industry. But your "without subsidies" is a low grade partisan talking point. I think it would be difficult to show that, end-to-end, the ICE car+fuel industry gets fewer subsidies than the electric car+electricity industry., end-to-end.

  6. #106
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Bottom feeding
    Posts
    7,141
    ^^^ Great review/report.
    It's really not hard or time-consuming, assuming you don't have a crappy charging situation (eg, take frequent long trips that are nowhere near chargers,
    Pretty much me. I drive long trips about 40 times/year, maybe more, never adjust my car requirement for weather and mountains, and I would never stop on a 250 mile drive.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    53
    (as a separate post)
    After 16 months and 20,000 miles, quick rundown on the 3. We bought it back in July of last year; we hadn't planned on pulling the trigger on a 3 as a replacement for my wife's 175k mile Subaru that was doing 45mi r/t each day. But then my job unexpectedly moved to be really close to my wife's so we decided to go EV for the shared+carpool vehicle, which meant selling my Golf R that I really loved, but didn't drive much. That made the old Impreza the ski car again, so I bought an X5 this summer and am selling the Subaru.

    Currently we've got 4 cars until I can get rid of the Subaru, but the only way to 'justify' the price of the 3 was as a do-it-all car. At the time, you could get an i3 for $20k brand new after incentives, so in order to justify the $40k Tesla (after incentives), it needs to be a *nice* do-it-all car. A quasi-luxury car. The kind of car you can roadtrip virtually anywhere. It can't just be a commuter appliance. There's nothing wrong with that, but somehow it would feel more painful to spend $20k on a brand new i3 that I could only drive to work and back, and had to remember to charge every day, and so on. That just sounds so much more limited. If I wanted a commute appliance EV, and to save money, I'd buy a used Leaf like everyone else

    Model 3 low points, in order:
    * The visibility sucks balls. You can't see the headlights of the car behind you, because the trunklid is so high. The rear 3/4 vis sucks, too. I can rely on the mirrors on the passenger side, however the shitty US-spec driver's side mirror means all you see is a grille, and there's a huge blind spot (yes, no matter how you adjust your mirrors). I'm a euro mirror sackrider, I'm desperately trying to source a convex driver's side mirror. The B-pillar somehow manages to hide cars -- I've almost merged into people several times even after a shoulder check. A euro mirror would solve all of this. Agree with another poster that the A-pillars hide pedestrians. Most of these visibility problems are common on newer cars; every year they get worse, and even stepping back to a 2016 or a 2008 model year car I notice how much the sightlines improve, let alone stepping back into the 90s or earlier where you can actually see without blind spot monitoring and rearview cameras and so on. But at least the vis out the front rocks! I love the low hood and low dash, it's like driving a Porsche. The road is RIGHT in front of your feet.

    * Wipers, yeah. Actually the auto wipers work really well but they were a bit sketchy at first and a physical control would be nice (you can always press the left stalk 'wipe/wash' button as you scramble to find the touchscreen control). Could use a few more physical controls, in general, but most touch controls are good/great/fine.

    * Trunk lid. I hate sedans. I always thought auto-close trunklids were silly, but damn, it would be convenient. It's high up, and really stiff, particularly in those hot summer months.


    Model 3 highest point:
    * (truly) Keyless entry. You just walk up to it and get in and drive away. No pressing buttons or swiping your hand on the door handle, or holding your phone up to the door handle (WTF, BMW). It remembers who has what phone, unlocks via bluetooth the instant you open the door, .. it moves your seats for the right driver (this is the first car I've shared with my wife). It's truly bloody amazing and perfect. Any time I drive anything else, I either try to open the door without pressing the button on the fob, or forget to lock it, or leave the keys in the ignition, or get confused as to why the motor is still running when I've opened the door. I can't overemphasize this. We share the car, and often go for a run after work (or whatever) and you never have to think/wonder who has the keys, or who will get back to the car first after the run. Do your thing, when you're done, get in the car.

    Okay, I realized I'm not going to make a full list of high points. It's my first EV, but it's really a fantastic car. Having a car that's just ready to go whenever you get to it is really hard to get your head around. I postpone washing the windshield and think "I'll just hit it with the squeegee next time I stop for gas" before I realize I never have to stop for gas. You don't have to wait for the engine to warm up for the heating system to blow warm air. Hell, you can pre-heat or pre-cool it from the app. Everything just works in a way that is often much better than a conventional car, but you don't really understand until you live with one, because you take for granted a lot of ICE flaws, where the EV flaws are advertised on car forums everywhere.

    I've driven a handful of Teslas, but no other EVs. My in-laws have a 3, my parents have an S, I had an S loaner once, my aunt and uncle have a 3 and an S. Hell just 2 weeks ago I was over in Idaho; drove the S home from the airport and then we roadtripped the 3 from Moscow to Seattle with 4 people and a trunk full of luggage. It actually would have made the 280mi drive without issue, but we brought lunch with us so we stopped at the charger in Cle Elum to top up, stretch our legs, have a quick lunch, and give them enough juice to get back to Cle Elum on the way home. I'm getting old enough that a 20min stop after 3-4 hours driving actually sounds nice. But obviously it's not nice in all circumstances -- not wanting to add even a 10-15min stop on our way up to the mountains after work, when you're arriving at 11pm already, plus the aforementioned not wanting to deal with charging at a house with no garage, was the reason we got the RWD 3 and are not going EV ski car at this point in time.

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