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  1. #126
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Imaginationland
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    4,350
    More pics of the homemade ascent plates, please

  2. #127
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    The Trees
    Posts
    809
    Attachment 325081

    Strong to Quite Strong
    That Don't Make No Sense

  3. #128
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,899
    Quote Originally Posted by NW_SKIER View Post
    More pics of the homemade ascent plates, please
    These things changed the game for ascents in specific snow conditions in steep, technical terrain in the forest. Combine using them with employing a ski drag method, you can basically dodge and weave through anything mother nature throws at ya in technical bushwhack scenarios. It's awesome. Only liability I've found is an obvious one: limited surface area for float, so they don't work all that great in deep foot pen snow/deep pow...but for that mostly consolidated semi supportive melt freeze/wet grains spring snow where hiking/bootpacking results in those erratic, annoying, sometimes supportive and sometimes unpredictable, dangerous post holing to the crotch, these things are the right tool for the job.

    Durability wise...milk crate plastic is pretty good but not the best. If the $$$ were unlimited, obviously better materials exist for the purpose...being on ski bum budget, i'm stickin to the yellow plastic for now.

    But hey, milk crates are free, so pretty much unlimited source material and it only takes about 30 minutes to construct a pair. I've tried a few different shapes...each work best in specific conditions. Both feel like technical rock climbing shoes for snow. You can french technique, kick steps straight in, use the little lips of plastic at the tips to get purchase on branches, broken off nubbings on log crossings, rock outcroppings...it's a whole new world of uphilling. One of the latest big surprises was how superior they are to the regular old hiking boot for steep, sinky moss forest floor. Better traction and better float...gonna be great for mushroom picking in the fall.

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    Master of mediocrity.

  4. #129
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    The greatest N. New Mexico resort in Colorado
    Posts
    2,010
    Finally got around to putting away my rock skis, so snapped a pic of my seldom used bench top setup. Cap rail came off the pony wall behind the stove when we remodeled the kitchen, picked up the vise at the Los Alamos ski swap for next to nothing a number of years ago. Held in place with two quick clamps and then it stands up out of the way so I can use the bench.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I do love these SVST vises, though mine is first gen so you can’t stand the ski up for edge work. Don’t mind, I do all that at work anyway.
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  5. #130
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Mt. Baker
    Posts
    1,534
    Well, I decided to re-work the home wax bench this weekend, since we are still waiting for enough snow to get to work.
    Here is an over view of the current setup.
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    At this point, I dont think there is a jig that I dont have. Any time I get a chance. I replace a jig-rex jig with a factory jig as they are more accurate and more reliable. The issue with the Jigarex is it uses plastic on metal for the width adjustment and as that wears the accuracy goes out the window.
    At the end of the workbench is a larger arbor press, that I made an adapter for, so it can serve double duty as a boot press using the SVST boot press tools.
    Here is a my wax and edge tuning drawer
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    After years of having both rotor-brushes and hand brushes, I decided to sell the hand brushes as I have not touched them since getting the root-brushes. Also if you have not tried them yet, the Pro series files by SVST are the best edge files I have used yet. I never touch my ice files now.

    This is my binding mounting drawer
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    I mostly use Binding Freedom inserts when mounting skis these days, but am still fully equipped to do traditional mounts and to fix anything an athlete might F'up while we are out shooting.

    This is my base repair drawer
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    The large black tube is a slide hammer for removing ski pole grips, so we can fine tune them to size. On the left is my general purpose file drawer. They have different file handles on purpose than my ski tuning files to keep everything separate.

    For vises, The SVST vise is hands down the best one that I have see and or used.
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    I machined new custom jaws for it on my Bridgeport that are wider, and have a negative rack on them so it better grips skis, even those with the most slanted or rounded top sheets.

  6. #131
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Somewhere else
    Posts
    4,700
    ^^^ that's some ski workshop porn right there.
    Goal: ski in the 2018/19 season

  7. #132
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    4,154
    This made me weep softly to myself out of joy.

  8. #133
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    116
    How does one get their hands on jigs?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  9. #134
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    461
    Quote Originally Posted by old mexico View Post
    How does one get their hands on jigs?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    ditto

  10. #135
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    7,710
    be a pro photog with years of industry cred and shoot for major ski and binding manufacturers maybe?



    Quote Originally Posted by old mexico View Post
    How does one get their hands on jigs?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  11. #136
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    A LSD Steakhouse somewhere in the Wasatch
    Posts
    12,920
    a lot of my at jigs came from patrol who aquired em so i could mount their skis faster and more efficiently for them
    ive bought jigs from mags, shops, and manufacturers and reps
    im not a jigerex fan
    my home bench is a clusterfuck right now
    mostly cause i do most of my work
    at work
    "When the child was a child it waited patiently for the first snow and it still does"- Van "The Man" Morrison
    "I find I have already had my reward, in the doing of the thing" - Buzz Holmstrom
    "THIS IS WHAT WE DO"-AML -ski on in eternal peace
    "I have posted in here but haven't read it carefully with my trusty PoliAsshat antenna on."-DipshitDanno

  12. #137
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    932
    I identify way more with Swissphic (or the recycling bin guy) than those uppity bridgeport folks! LOL

    I put my bin of waxing tools on top of the recycling bin, and the skis on a pair of sawhorses outside - because my garage is way too cluttered and full of junk to wax skis in it!
    (Hell if I don't come out of the garage in a couple of hours, someone should call S&R.)

    Pics? Nope!

  13. #138
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    4,154
    Quote Originally Posted by gregorys View Post
    I identify way more with Swissphic (or the recycling bin guy) than those uppity bridgeport folks! LOL

    I put my bin of waxing tools on top of the recycling bin, and the skis on a pair of sawhorses outside - because my garage is way too cluttered and full of junk to wax skis in it!
    (Hell if I don't come out of the garage in a couple of hours, someone should call S&R.)

    Pics? Nope!
    Yeah, I've been devolving toward this for a few years now also. The garage has become a gym, zwift room, gear storage, etc, and I don't want wax shavings all over the carpet (yes, it has carpet in it.) So I might drop inside, but scraping and brushing happen outside.

    I need a rotobrush. Badly. But they ain't cheap so I haven't convinced myself to pull the trigger yet.

  14. #139
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    495
    Quote Originally Posted by EWG View Post
    I need a rotobrush. Badly. But they ain't cheap so I haven't convinced myself to pull the trigger yet.
    I need rotobrushes, Swix evo edger, and an electric scraper sharpener - but the need is not strong enough to overcome the cost, so Im still doing it all the old fashioned way like a sucker.

  15. #140
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Location
    Wasatch
    Posts
    326
    Easy bench for us low-space, low-budget folks w/ tech bindings -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80hKie2Onkw

  16. #141
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Somewhere else
    Posts
    4,700
    Quote Originally Posted by CirqueScaler View Post
    Easy bench for us low-space, low-budget folks w/ tech bindings -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80hKie2Onkw
    I've built a similar bench but without the pin grab 2x3... neat idea!
    Goal: ski in the 2018/19 season

  17. #142
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Mt. Baker
    Posts
    1,534
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Barron DeJong View Post
    I need rotobrushes, Swix evo edger, and an electric scraper sharpener - but the need is not strong enough to overcome the cost, so I’m still doing it all the old fashioned way like a sucker.
    I'm often waxing 4-5 pairs of skis at a time, so the time Proto brushes save, has more than paid for themselves. If you are just doing one pair of skis at the time, then they are not worth the cost IMOP.

  18. #143
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,757
    I glamorized the work space a while back and would definitely do it again. The red you see is copper. The old wood you see is very old redwood from a horse coral. It even has a bullet embedded in it. And- the bench has power outlets. And LED lighting.

    I sold this piece to a ski school. They deserved it.

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  19. #144
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    4,154
    Wax shavings suck. If not for that Id have a lot more flexibility on location and layout.

  20. #145
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    The Bull City
    Posts
    7,380
    I've gone minimalist.. Tools, bits, iron, wax etc in a large tackle box. Bench is the washer and dryer tops with a wood device designed to hold the skis steady with brakes down. I also occasionally throw clamps/vises on the porch raining out back if I know it's going to be really messy. But, I don't have a garage or utility room. Washer and dryer are in the kitchen..
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  21. #146
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Bottom feeding
    Posts
    9,419
    Quote Originally Posted by EWG View Post
    Wax shavings suck. If not for that Id have a lot more flexibility on location and layout.
    Yup. I tried waxing in the garage but its not heated so basically it was impossible. Now I do it in the basement and I keep a big sheet on the ground, and every year I scoop up the shavings that way.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  22. #147
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    495
    Yep, Ive used rotobrushes when I worked in a shop, and theyre awesome. So fast and so little effort.

    Right now its just me and young kids skiing in the house, so Im able to keep up doing everything manually for now.

  23. #148
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Almost Mountains
    Posts
    1,194
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Barron DeJong View Post
    Yep, I’ve used rotobrushes when I worked in a shop, and they’re awesome. So fast and so little effort.

    Right now it’s just me and young kids skiing in the house, so I’m able to keep up doing everything manually for now.
    I'd think the young kids would put a premium on time, especially since they (presumably) aren't tuning their own skis yet.

    The Evo (or similar edge tools) is, IMO, a bigger east-coast time saver while also providing consistently excellent results. I can take a pair of dull skis and have them truly sharp in under 15 minutes, so long as the base edges are decent. I can keep mostly sharp skis super-sharp in even less time per pair; setting up and cleaning up takes more time than actually doing the edges if I haven't gotten behind.

    I'll try to remember to grab a photo next time I'm in the newly setup wax room. I keep getting distracted by the home-workshop stuff on the other side of the room, although that's close to organized now.

  24. #149
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    10,033
    Quote Originally Posted by gaijin View Post
    I glamorized the work space a while back and would definitely do it again. The red you see is copper. The old wood you see is very old redwood from a horse coral. It even has a bullet embedded in it. And- the bench has power outlets. And LED lighting.

    I sold this piece to a ski school. They deserved it.

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    This is fantastic.

  25. #150
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    495
    Quote Originally Posted by anotherVTskibum View Post
    I'd think the young kids would put a premium on time, especially since they (presumably) aren't tuning their own skis yet.
    My kids are still in elementary school and skiing only greens, so not too tough on equipment yet. Wish they were further along, but maybe by the time theyre harder on equipment theyll also be old enough to work on it themselves. Took them out for the first time this season last weekend and they seem more excited this year, so hopefully we make some good progression. Maybe offer them some rotobrushes as a potential reward for improvement?

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