Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 47

Thread: Firewood length

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    423

    Firewood length

    So the new fireplace is 48" in the front and about 38" in the back. Thinking about getting 30" logs? Any reason not to do that? Should I be using standard 16" or 22"?

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Driving2VT
    Posts
    3,120

    Firewood length

    Ease of stacking, storing, drying, moving them around all makes me a 16 fan.
    Uno mas

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    47,025
    Well if you're buying wood 18" or 24" makes the math easier on a cord. Carrying a load of of 24" or 30" logs is gonna be heavy

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Driving2VT
    Posts
    3,120

    Firewood length

    Hand splitting for kindling another factor.
    I need to splice for a wood stove and a smaller sauna stove too.
    Id be intimidated by 24+
    Uno mas

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    14,884
    Propane logs.

    or use what ever they use at Burny man.
    watch out for snakes

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Driving2VT
    Posts
    3,120

    Firewood length

    Also sometimes its getting later in the evening and fire started to die but you want that inevitable one last beer and you want to extend the fire a bit. That 30 going to turn 1 more into 3 more.....
    Uno mas

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    on the banks of Fish Creek
    Posts
    1,382
    Log is sweet.....



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    10,842
    Sounds like you're buying not cutting your own. In which case buy whatever you get the best deal on. I've never used long logs but I wonder if the the longer pieces burn as completely, especially if you don't take pains to kindle the whole length.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    North,NorthEast
    Posts
    2,515
    Its really the girth that makes the difference

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,194
    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    Well if you're buying wood 18" or 24" makes the math easier on a cord. Carrying a load of of 24" or 30" logs is gonna be heavy
    12", 16", 24", and 48" all make the math easy on a cord.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    10,243

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Mostly the Elks, mostly.
    Posts
    381
    I buck at 18"
    burns fully, fits in my stack/shed the best, easy to work with. for my application 18 best use of hand-splitting efforts. unbucked math good for for my truck and trailer (though i did once smash a 54" log off the side of my truck. different story).


    If buying, +1 for best value.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    47,025
    Quote Originally Posted by SKIP IN7RO View Post
    12", 16", 24", and 48" all make the math easy on a cord.
    none of it's exactly hard. But when you're standing there and the guy still has it on the truck wanting to dump it I'd rather do 18 in my head than 16 and 24 rather than 30.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    18,034
    I knew a guy who used to do that but he was stuffing long pieces into a stove made from an oildrum, probably a waste of wood cuz an oil drum stove isnt so efficent

    a 30" piece of wood is gona weight almost twice as much as a 16" piece when you try and move it around to put on or deal with in the fire, for a fireplace its gona be a 2 hand job while bending over

    you are seeking a solution to a problem that does not exist
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,194
    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    I'd rather do 18 in my head than 16 and 24 rather than 30.
    What? Show me this math with a Sharpie so I know it's legit. 12, 16, 24, 48 inchers need 4, 3, 2, 1 rows respectively of 8 feet by 4 feet to make a cord. 18 and 30 complicate the maths.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    5,003
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    the situation strikes me as WAY too much drama at this point

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    5,003
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    the situation strikes me as WAY too much drama at this point

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    423
    So the consensus is to buy standard size and run it double wide?

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    47,025
    Quote Originally Posted by SKIP IN7RO View Post
    18 and 30 complicate the maths.
    30 does for sure. For wood I think in foot units since a cord is 128 cubes so 18 is easier than 16 because 18 is 1.5 when I multiply. Not sure that's clear but whatever I tried.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,194
    I follow your math....18" log by 21.33' long row at a 4' height equals a cord. OR 3 rows at 4' height but only 7.11' long per row works, too.

    Wood buying tip- do the same maths as your wood guy.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    47,025
    128 is the only number that really matters

    I don't know about decimals beyond .5 in my head though. But say a stacked row of 18" logs is 10 feet long by 5 feet high, that's 10 x 5 x 1.5 (18") = 75 cubic feet. If they were a foot it'd be 50 and if they were 2 feet it would be 100. That's how I've always thought about it at least. I mean the math works.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    on the banks of Fish Creek
    Posts
    1,382
    how many cubits is that?

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Verdi NV
    Posts
    7,910
    Quote Originally Posted by VTeton View Post
    So the new fireplace is 48" in the front and about 38" in the back. Thinking about getting 30" logs? Any reason not to do that? Should I be using standard 16" or 22"?

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
    You would want 22 inch.
    Own your fail. ~Jer~

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    47,025
    Quote Originally Posted by m2711c View Post
    how many cubits is that?
    rrrriiiighhhht


    oooh, a Cosby bit. Edgy.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    10,842
    The guys who sell firewood around here don't do math. If they were good at math they would have easier jobs. They throw a bunch of wood in a truck until it looks like a cord. Somehow when I get it all stacked and measure it, it comes out to a cord, or sometimes a little more.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •