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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Extending the life of an older bike

    Was hoping to pickup a replacement for my gen 2 Nomad this fall, but unexpected home repairs, car repairs etc have made that a no go. Going to have to stretch it’s life out for another year. Built this up in 2011, Fox 36 Float RC2 fork, RP2 Shock, Sun Ringle Charger Pro Rims, 2x10 Sram X0 drive train, Hayes Stroker Trail brakes. Everything is getting worn, fork and shock have been serviced each year, but just fluid and seals if required.

    Thinking I will send both the Fork and shock into Fox for a full rebuild. I usually build up my own bike from a frame, so maybe replace drivetrain with a 1x12 as I could use it on a new bike. I can get an XD driver for the rims if I go SRAM, no Shimano option available as of yet. Brakes are fine, a bleed and new pads/rotors. Rims, I have broken 1/2 dozen spokes over the years, but the wheels are still round, so maybe just have it serviced and trued. Biggest issue is that when I built this bike up, it was so it could do double duty in the Whistler Bike park, and for trail riding, I no longer spend summers in Whistler, our local trails don’t need that kind of burly, so it is robust and heavier than I need now. I don’t think I can really do much to lighten it as the obvious things, rims, fork etc won’t be transferable to a new bike. So probably limited to carbon handlebar, lighter tires and seat.

    Any other suggestions or comments on my options?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Can/USA
    Posts
    757
    I'd say forsure going Eagle 1x12 would be a good upgrade. Maybe GX or X01? Like you said i wouldn't drop a ton into it if you don't plan on keeping it for more then another year.

    i'm somewhat in the same boat with a first gen Bronson... only adding parts i can transfer to a gen 3 in a year or 2

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    583
    tbh i would go 1x11 rather than eagle unless you really feel like you would need the gearing. Save a bunch of weight, cost and shifting issues with eagle. Just run a 26 or 28 tooth front ring if necessary. You'd also be able to pull this off when you sold the bike and put the old setup back on.

    I would probably replace the brakes too, but thats just me. I think the weight savings from a carbon bar are pretty negligible, same goes with the seat.

    You might also be able to upgrade fork internals from somewhere like Vorsprung if you feel like your fork isn't working well, though not sure if they work with that old of a fork.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    8,571
    By the time you pay for a full rebuild on the fork and shock and buy some sort of new drivetrain, you're at least $800 into it. Probably more. That seems like a lot of money to throw at a bike that old that isn't perfect for what you want.

    I bet for $1k-ish you can buy a used hardtail that's in good working order. Sounds like the trails you're riding aren't super rowdy, so a hardtail would work ok. And down the line when it's time to buy something new, having a hardtail in the garage is never a bad thing.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Creekside
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    1,277
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    By the time you pay for a full rebuild on the fork and shock and buy some sort of new drivetrain, you're at least $800 into it. Probably more. That seems like a lot of money to throw at a bike that old that isn't perfect for what you want.

    I bet for $1k-ish you can buy a used hardtail that's in good working order. Sounds like the trails you're riding aren't super rowdy, so a hardtail would work ok. And down the line when it's time to buy something new, having a hardtail in the garage is never a bad thing.
    A lot of our trails can include some pretty rooty/rocky sections, hard tail might be a little sketchy at anything other than a slow crawl.

    I might have to just settle for a fork/shock rebuild, and minimal replacements in the drive train to get thru to next fall.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    583
    You can get an 11 speed XT drivetrain on tbsbikeparts.com for around 300CAD. 11-46 cassette
    I find i notice the fork more than the shock so would def opt for that before a shock service. I've often had shock services and not noticed the difference. Never happens with a fork.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Creekside
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    1,277
    Currently running 24/38 x 11-36. Could use slightly lower gearing for grinding up steep stuff. What would be a good 1x11 combo?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    583
    on 26 inch wheels i would say 28 tooth. It depends on your cranks, because i don't think you can go smaller than 28 or even 30 on the non cinch style cranks.

    edit. Do you mean you want lower gearing than you currently have? I don't know if any 1x11 would be easier pedalling than 24/36 though im no good at math. You would likely need to get into eagle territory there.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Creekside
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    Well easier would be nice, but I’d settle for not worse. Actually I think a 30/46 would be a tiny bit lower. A 28/42 would be exactly the same as what I have, so 28/46 would be enough of a change to be noticeable. Obviously I am going to lose a lot in the high gear either way, but I seldom get there unless I am on a road. 46 tooth need the long cage Shimano?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,512
    This has been really helpful for me:

    http://gears.mtbcrosscountry.com/

    Does not work well on mobile.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
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    8,254
    I agree with toast. However, if you're intent on a drivetrain upgrade, my suggestion would be to go with 12 speed.

    While it probably doesn't matter as much on your old Nomad, that 28 tooth will change the way a newer, 1x specific bike pedals. I ran a 28t on a bike designed for a 32 for a few months, and it very obviously had a negative effect on the way the bike pedaled. The lack of high gearing also sucked, though we have a good bit of gravel connectors here where it's easy to spin out.

    I haven't ridden Shimano's 12 speed stuff yet, but I've had no issues with Eagle, nor have folks I ride with.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Well, I think I am going to just do the minimum to keep the bike going. To many possible issues with buying parts I ‘might’ be able to use on a future bike. So I guess fork rebuild, new 10 speed cassette and try to ignore all the new bikes for another year.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    2,809

    Extending the life of an older bike

    Might be able to find a working used fork for less than the cost of factory rebuild. Perhaps it’s less high performance than your fox 36, but I doubt you’ll see a worthy ROi on the rebuild when you sell the bike. And you can sell the 36 as is and potentially almost break even.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,512
    This year I transitioned from a 1x10 drivetrain with a 32 in front and an 11-46 in the back to a 1x11 with a 30 / 11-50 combo. The bike is heavier and high gear shifting (11 - 13t cog on the cassette) is worse. It is nice to have the smaller heavy, but if I could go back and save the $$, I probably would.

    I'm in the same spot - probably going to have to ride this bike for another year. I've had a lot of fun on this bike and trying to stay positive.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Eugenio Oregón
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    7,045

    Extending the life of an older bike

    Quote Originally Posted by eldereldo View Post
    Well, I think I am going to just do the minimum to keep the bike going. To many possible issues with buying parts I ‘might’ be able to use on a future bike. So I guess fork rebuild, new 10 speed cassette and try to ignore all the new bikes for another year.
    Do that ... then get a good low-deductible insurance policy and the cheapest bike lock you can find, park in unscrupulous neighborhoods after your rides ... you’ll have yourself a new bike before not too long!

    When I lived in downtown Oakland CA, that’s how I found myself going from a beat up 2x9 old ass Norco with heavy crappy components, to a used Yeti SB-66, to a brand new Santa Cruz in the span of 6 months ... I think the same asshole that stole my Norco came back to steal my Yeti a few months later. I had a low deductible renters policy and they didn’t drop me or raise my rates! Thank goodness I had pics and serial numbers, so the insurance company issued the claim payout ASAP once the police reports were registered.
    _______________________________________________
    "Strapping myself to a sitski built with 30lb of metal and fibreglass then trying to water ski in it sounds like a stupid idea to me.

    I'll be there."
    ... Andy Campbell

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
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    17,965
    insted of spending money on something you are already planning to sell just wait and see what breaks
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    727
    Get the biggest 10-spd Sunrace cassette that will work with your RD.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Trouserville
    Posts
    14,446
    Should probably just buy a new sled and forget about the bike. You'll get at least a week of non-awareness.
    Besides the comet that killed the dinosaurs nothing has destroyed a species faster than entitled white people.-ajp

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