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  1. #126
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    It’s amazing how much spare time everyone has

  2. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    Perhaps squirrels ate thru the cable?
    My money is on porcupines.

  3. #128
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    The plastic core of the rope would also melt at a much lower temp than the metal braid. I have no idea how much losing the core would compromise the integrity of the rope and how much of the safety rating is based on an intact core.
    Aim for the chopping block. If you aim for the wood, you will have nothing. Aim past the wood, aim through the wood.
    http://tim-kirchoff.pixels.com/

  4. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    I'd choose a ceramic mold for the thermite, personally.
    Me too


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  5. #130
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    I actualy haven't been up there in 20 + yars when you had to hike up and it wasnt so busy in fact there was nobody else up there it was a warm bluebird day, some good exercise got the blood circulating

    so speaking of explosive events the wife was feeling randy

    I assume it would be so busy up there I doubt you could pull that ^^ off now
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  6. #131
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    That cable didn't stand a chance.

    RCMP just posted a picture of the perp.

    Name:  Wanted%u00252Bsquirrel.jpg
Views: 774
Size:  30.2 KB
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  7. #132
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    Apr 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    Those cables have a safety factor of 8? That is stupid crazy high haha. Im not doubting, but IME factors of safety over 2 are typically reserved for situations where the engineer is doing a good amount of guessing as to site and loading conditions and/or there is a serious threat to life safety functions for society eg hospitals, fire stations etc. Hell, even geotech safety factors dont get that high. That is crazy high if true.

    Regardless, the vessel would just need to melt at the same relative speed as the cable would need to weaken. Meaning that the vessel could be a much weaker material than the cable. And heated material doesnt weaken in a linear fashion. IDK, doesnt seem that difficult to execute, but then again ive never tried haha.
    If you Google wire rope safety factors or wire rope inspections, you can really geek out on some of this stuff, including failure modes and how many strands of a wire rope need to be damaged in one area before it must be replaced.

    Regardless, what I was able to find suggests that 8 is a normal minimum safety factor when hoisting people in industrial applications (c.f. Table D-3, https://www.usbr.gov/ssle/safety/RSHS/appD.pdf p. D-7)—that's a U.S. government doc that lists various wire rope safety factors, including "7-12" for "power passenger and freight elevators", 8.9 for the hoist rope on a "rope guided workman hoist", 8-11 for "personnel hoists".

  8. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    Those cables have a safety factor of 8? That is stupid crazy high haha. Im not doubting, but IME factors of safety over 2 are typically reserved for situations where the engineer is doing a good amount of guessing as to site and loading conditions and/or there is a serious threat to life safety functions for society eg hospitals, fire stations etc. Hell, even geotech safety factors dont get that high. That is crazy high if true.
    Normal crane hoisting wire rope has a safety factor of five. In fact, although it doesn't apply here, elevator ropes required safety factor decreases with length because of the gross weight of the rope. This is typically only an issue in places like mines where the drop could approach a mile.

    Safety factor of cranes wire ropes. For example:

    (E) The operating design factor for the boom hoist reeving system must be not less than five.
    https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text...26.1414?page=1

  9. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    I'd choose a ceramic mold for the thermite, personally.
    I’ve seen clay pots for house plants mentioned as a container in a YouTube video.

    I haven’t given much thought as to how feasible this approach is. I know I just wouldn’t want to be right next to that cable when it finally snapped.

  10. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by anotherVTskibum View Post
    If you Google wire rope safety factors or wire rope inspections, you can really geek out on some of this stuff, including failure modes and how many strands of a wire rope need to be damaged in one area before it must be replaced.

    Regardless, what I was able to find suggests that 8 is a normal minimum safety factor when hoisting people in industrial applications (c.f. Table D-3, https://www.usbr.gov/ssle/safety/RSHS/appD.pdf p. D-7)—that's a U.S. government doc that lists various wire rope safety factors, including "7-12" for "power passenger and freight elevators", 8.9 for the hoist rope on a "rope guided workman hoist", 8-11 for "personnel hoists".
    Thats crazy high! Maybe it has to do with the negligible increase in cost for that application that would come with safety factors that high. Good info to know though.

  11. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    That cable didn't stand a chance.

    RCMP just posted a picture of the perp.

    Name:  Wanted%u00252Bsquirrel.jpg
Views: 774
Size:  30.2 KB
    I’ll go out on a limb and say that’s nuts!


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  12. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by t-the-east View Post
    It’s amazing how much spare time everyone has
    That's the vision statement for this forum.

  13. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    Thats crazy high! Maybe it has to do with the negligible increase in cost for that application that would come with safety factors that high. Good info to know though.
    High yes, but you never know when the perfect storm could arise.

    Every gondola loaded to max person capacity. And they’re all fat Americans. And they all have fat skis with Dukes. Gotta plan for that shit.

  14. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by east or bust View Post
    High yes, but you never know when the perfect storm could arise.

    Every gondola loaded to max person capacity. And they’re all fat Americans. And they all have fat skis with Dukes. Gotta plan for that shit.
    Maybe this is what caused the incident at Vail. Max load was probably based on the average European's weight.

  15. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    Thats crazy high! Maybe it has to do with the negligible increase in cost for that application that would come with safety factors that high. Good info to know though.
    Cable and rope systems have high safety factors to account for unanticipated shock loads not usually encountered in buildings. If you build it to stand up to 8x the dynamic loading expected in the worst weather under a full load, then if you have something unpredicted, like the cable coming off the sheaves, the cable doesn't fail, thus you see crazy events where the cable literally holds up failed lift towers.

    I don't engineer lifts. But the principles are similar for professional rope rescue systems.
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  16. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by The AD View Post
    Maybe this is what caused the incident at Vail. Max load was probably based on the average European's weight.
    Your self hatred of your Americanism is showing thru, Kshama

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/li...en-in-speedos/
    Last edited by Rock Knocker; 08-12-2019 at 03:48 PM.

  17. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    Cable and rope systems have high safety factors to account for unanticipated shock loads not usually encountered in buildings. If you build it to stand up to 8x the dynamic loading expected in the worst weather under a full load, then if you have something unpredicted, like the cable coming off the sheaves, the cable doesn't fail, thus you see crazy events where the cable literally holds up failed lift towers.

    I don't engineer lifts. But the principles are similar for professional rope rescue systems.
    Ahhh that makes sense. additional, compounding dynamic loading caused by other failures.

    Ive changed by theory. I am now going with Russian lasers cut the haul cable.

  18. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    That cable didn't stand a chance.

    RCMP just posted a picture of the perp.

    Name:  Wanted%u00252Bsquirrel.jpg
Views: 774
Size:  30.2 KB
    so a squirrel is really just a rat with a good publicist

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/briti...date-1.5244316

    the cops are saying it was defintely cut, the cable & 20 of 30 cars will have to be replaced
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  19. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    That cable didn't stand a chance.

    RCMP just posted a picture of the perp.

    Name:  Wanted%u00252Bsquirrel.jpg
Views: 774
Size:  30.2 KB
    Boris and Natasha were quick to blame moose and squirrel for the incident:

    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  20. #145
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    that is pretty fucked up. You think it was an environmental group? And they must know how it was cut by the cable. I am sure they wont disclose that.

  21. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by skideeppow View Post
    that is pretty fucked up. You think it was an environmental group? And they must know how it was cut by the cable. I am sure they wont disclose that.
    The RCMP have said the cable was definitely cut. They haven’t given details about just how it was cut yet.
    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/briti...alls-1.5242787

    In that article, one of the RCMP inspectors is quoted as saying the perp put himself in extreme danger when cutting the rope, which could imply that they think the rope was cut by someone right there, in which case a cutting disk or torch could be the likely way to do it. Not sure how completely informed this “inspector” is, though. Might be a public relations hack who doesn’t know all the details, or perhaps they are deliberately muddying the waters. Guess we’ll find out eventually.

  22. #147
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    Battery power
    Name:  IMG_0467.JPG
Views: 582
Size:  19.7 KB
    “I have a responsibility to not be intimidated and bullied by low life losers who abuse what little power is granted to them as ski patrollers.”

  23. #148
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    One of the witnesses said the first bang they heard sounded like a gunshot. Then a bunch more louder bangs.

    What would happen if someone shot the cable?

    ... I saw it done once in a western movie when I was a kid.

  24. #149
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    The cable snapping probably made a bang like a gunshot... or a coulda been a cutting charge.

    Gondola cabins hitting the ground make loud bangs.
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  25. #150
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    rumour mill is saying angle grinder, a tower mid span where it trends back down so rope went either direction from tower, and allegedly some very useless video was taken from afar...security apparently heard something happening and then watched it collapse

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