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  1. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    West Coast of the East Coast
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    6,503
    Quote Originally Posted by AK47bp View Post
    Not sure why big companies would want to keep healthcare in house.

    It’s the 2nd biggest cost for an employer and it’s expected, so it’s now a cost of doing business. The plus side of eliminating the 2nd biggest expense (behind payroll) would seem to outweigh the employee retention benefits.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Stop it with the logic. People are bitching about corporate 'Merica.

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    1,970
    The right time is yesterday.

    As it's Herman Melville's birthday
    "Now, in general, STICK TO THE BOAT, is your true motto in whaling; but cases will sometimes happen when LEAP FROM THE BOAT, is still better."

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    4,875
    Quote Originally Posted by Bromontane View Post
    Answer: employer HC is an externality that sprung up to get around price controls
    Attachment 289906

    The opacity of the current structure is such that individuals don't appreciate how much wages are now suppressed by runaway costs of Employer-Provided HC, which gives a false sense of 'success' in using EPHC plans. And business innovation is limited materially by the higher barrier to entry that accompanies having to invest in relatively high-end plans & HR depts to manage all the benefits. And beyond that, competition within the EPHC market is largely dulled by the degrees of separation between employees and end-providers. The market feedback is distorted through so many intermediaries you just get ever-increasing costs as both HR & business leaders "don't want another headache" beyond their core businesses, leading them to pay up year after year & pass costs to employees.
    There it is.


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  4. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    LV-426
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    15,758
    Quote Originally Posted by dunfree View Post
    The right time is yesterday.

    As it's Herman Melville's birthday
    [/FONT][/COLOR]
    If you don't do it this year, you'll be another year older when you do.

    Some wise person once said that.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Access to Granlibakken
    Posts
    7,123
    Quote Originally Posted by AK47bp View Post
    Not sure why big companies would want to keep healthcare in house.

    Itís the 2nd biggest cost for an employer and itís expected, so itís now a cost of doing business. The plus side of eliminating the 2nd biggest expense (behind payroll) would seem to outweigh the employee retention benefits.


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    https://www.google.com/amp/s/khn.org...ll-debate/amp/

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    14,673



    On this day in 1921, the Canadian Merchant Marine freighter "Canadian Exporter" was en route from Vancouver B.C. to Portland, Oregon, to pick up a cargo of lumber bound for Asia. She got caught in one of those notorious late summer fogs we have around here on the Long Beach peninsula, and ran aground on the sands at the entrance to Willapa Bay, near Leadbetter Point. Unable to back off on her own, the ship had to wait for the fog to clear and engage the assistance of the salvage tugs "Wallula" and "Algerine", neither of which was able to free her. All hands were removed without incident.

    The following day it was apparent that the "Exporter" was beginning to break up in the swells. The tug "Algerine" prepared to depart when her crew was chilled to the bone by the sudden wail of the freighters' horn. In spite of the fact that no one remained aboard the doomed ship, her horn continued to blast away. The salvage skipper took a boat and some skittish crewmen to investigate, and they found a large crack travelling down the aft side of the freighter near the bridge. The mysterious whistle blasts occurred as the ship's severed front section, rocking with the wave action, tightened and released the whistle cord.

    One final whistle blast came at 7:30 a.m. as the "Canadian Exporter" gave its last breath of life. With the sound of popping rivets and cracking steel, the ship broke in two within minutes. Further salvage attempts were made, but the "Canadian Exporter" was lost forever.
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkiní Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Mostly the Elks, mostly.
    Posts
    368
    OP if you bail do you stay in the same trade? apples to apples?

    loyalty vs repeat business.

    Jobs pay dollarz and bene's to do work. And so long as I (and they) get fair value, it continues. The simple kind of retention that has to be paid for: aka repeat business.

    But in the true sense of loyalty? As in, passing up better $ offers due to some intangible commitment to the company? emotional connection or feeling of family and trust etc ...

    Based on what you described, sounds like the former. So if that's the case, I say bail for greener pastures. Doesn't sound like 'loyalty' exists or has the potential to benefit in the future. But line something new up first

    I have taken other jobs for less $ because I didn't agree with management's treatment of people. Like, inverse loyalty. The negative impact the company's ideology had on headspace wasn't worth higher wage.
    Money is just money, and I've never been paid enough to be miserable.

    Do what's best for you. Bad work situation can spill into your time away from work, which is never worth the brain damage.

    Oh, and someone (benny?) said pension. Not a factor for me - but it might be for you.


    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post

    Maybe large companies are against healthcare reform because they know they can trap you in your job and pay you shit because of most people's need for some kind of adequate healthcare plan. Huh, don't know why I just realized that.
    The ol' golden handcuffs. I know it all too well.

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    12,014
    I have taken other jobs for less $ because I didn't agree with management's treatment of people. Like, inverse loyalty. The negative impact the company's ideology had on headspace wasn't worth higher wage.
    Money is just money, and I've never been paid enough to be miserable.
    Thanks I needed to read that. I am mulling over termination of work for a large company that I contract for. It will likely cost me > 25K a year but I know it is the right thing to do.

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    14,848
    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post



    On this day in 1921, the Canadian Merchant Marine freighter "Canadian Exporter" was en route from Vancouver B.C. to Portland, Oregon, to pick up a cargo of lumber bound for Asia. She got caught in one of those notorious late summer fogs we have around here on the Long Beach peninsula, and ran aground on the sands at the entrance to Willapa Bay, near Leadbetter Point. Unable to back off on her own, the ship had to wait for the fog to clear and engage the assistance of the salvage tugs "Wallula" and "Algerine", neither of which was able to free her. All hands were removed without incident.

    The following day it was apparent that the "Exporter" was beginning to break up in the swells. The tug "Algerine" prepared to depart when her crew was chilled to the bone by the sudden wail of the freighters' horn. In spite of the fact that no one remained aboard the doomed ship, her horn continued to blast away. The salvage skipper took a boat and some skittish crewmen to investigate, and they found a large crack travelling down the aft side of the freighter near the bridge. The mysterious whistle blasts occurred as the ship's severed front section, rocking with the wave action, tightened and released the whistle cord.

    One final whistle blast came at 7:30 a.m. as the "Canadian Exporter" gave its last breath of life. With the sound of popping rivets and cracking steel, the ship broke in two within minutes. Further salvage attempts were made, but the "Canadian Exporter" was lost forever.
    Ships die in pain. A friend who was on board a USN fast attack sub that collided with a Russian sub heard the sounds of the other vessel breaking apart as it hit crush depth. Chilling.
    watch out for snakes

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    10,823
    Working in a steel mill I cast off the Edmund Fitzgerald. It went down 3 months later. I guess I pushed too hard.

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Posts
    5,128
    ^^bill brasky lives on

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