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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
    Bad Times at the El Royale vs OUATIHW:


    https://crimereads.com/once-upon-a-t...OX9mkRn3CkjSLM
    I watched both and liked OUATIHW way better. The lady that wrote that review seems upset that there was not a strong female voice in the QT movie. Probably a side discussion but it seems like almost most of the recent movies have made the female protagonists stronger than the men and this is a 60's period piece.
    License to kill gophers by the government of the United Nations

  2. #52
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    Nov 2008
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    4,166
    If I had to pick between the two, I'd probably go with Once Upon a Time, but it's close. Comparison's such as this can easily get lost in the weeds, so I chose to just appreciate the strong points of each movie, and the superficial similarities. One weak point for me with Once Upon a time was DeCaprio; never been a fan of his, although I did like him in the Aviator and Django.

  3. #53
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    Oct 2003
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    Inception and Wolf of Wall Street.

    Let's do some livin'
    After, we die

  4. #54
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    LDC's seminal work was Growing Pains.

    Though I have yet to see this film:
    https://nypost.com/2019/08/12/the-re...ts-you-to-see/
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  5. #55
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    Nov 2008
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    Didn't like Inception, but not because of LDC. Haven't seen WoWS.
    Forgot Revenant - he was excellent in that.

  6. #56
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    His getting into his Lambo and driving on ludes scene in Wolf is worth the full price of admission.

    Let's do some livin'
    After, we die

  7. #57
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    Mar 2006
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    Missoula, MT
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    While the acting was good, Especially DiCaprio and Pitt, I found the movie pointless and about 15 minutes worth of actual story. Wait for it to hit Netflix.
    My dad and I went for the air conditioning, mostly.
    No longer stuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    Just an uneducated guess.

  8. #58
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    Mar 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    His getting into his Lambo and driving on ludes scene in Wolf is worth the full price of admission.
    That was hysterical.
    No longer stuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    Just an uneducated guess.

  9. #59
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    Definitely worth watching, couldnt stop laughing in the last 15 minutes.

    Both actors do their best work without eachother in their scenes. Lots of good drama from Pitts first encounter at the ranch, really didnt know what to expect there.

  10. #60
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    What to Read About ‘Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood’ https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/20/m...-coverage.html

    Let's do some livin'
    After, we die

  11. #61
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    Sep 2006
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    Brandy, you're a fine girl...

    For all the dog lovers:

    https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood...-brandy-ending
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  12. #62
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    Feb 2008
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    watch out for snakes

  13. #63
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    Feb 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Tortoise View Post
    I dunno. ALL of Django was fantastic. And I loved all of Inglorious. Still haven't seen The Hateful 8, based on the reviews.
    Watched it about six times to fully appreciate that one.

  14. #64
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    Sep 2006
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    I finally saw OUATIH the other week.
    Caught it at a Monday matinee at the Grand Lake in Oakland, CA on 35mm.
    I thoroughly enjoyed it, but am still formulating my take on it (have jotted down rough notes).

    When the final credits rolled I actually wanted to go outside and buy a ticket to the next showing.
    I would give it a 4.5 / 5 and felt it was one of QT's better films.

    I am not a fan of LDC, but this role grabbed me from the getgo. I completely believed him as the B/C list actor wrestling with his own cinematic mortality. Pitt is growing into a Redford type actor as he ages. A lot of hype has been ladled on the fact that Margot Robbie had very little dialogue, but I felt her facial expressions and body language conveyed so much emotion and character; I believe it's harder to act without saying anything and she crushed it.
    Still wrapping my mind around many of the layers present, but again, totally dug it.

    Planning to see it next week on digital so I can see if I can tell the difference between it and the 35mm. Rather bummed that QT isn't doing a 70mm Road Show, though. The closest it was showing to me was San Francisco and those shows were almost always sold-out (plus I no longer enjoy making the trek from the mountains into The City due to traffic, lack of parking, etc.). Hateful 8 made it to Sacramento in 70mm, which was cool...oh well.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  15. #65
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    watch out for snakes

  16. #66
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    Went to Reno to see OUATIH for a second go-around, this time on digital.
    The 35mm film print I saw intitially was "warmer" and grainier and just a tad grungier, but the differences are subtle (would probably have noticed much more differences had I seen the film version back-to-back with the digital, rather than a month apart).

    I really dig this film.
    I also think all the hullabloo over the Bruce Lee bit and the "limited" screen time of Margot Robbie is just that, hullabaloo.
    On second viewing (and after reading a number of editorials on the Bruce Lee "controversy") it's blatantly obvious that the Bruce Lee scene is a flashback/memory of Cliff's, so it's "truthfullness" can easily be questioned; it's Cliff's fucking memory of the event, not meant to be "historical fact".
    In terms of Robbie's Sharon Tate, she is a supporting character. The entire film is from the viewpoint of Rick and Cliff, two white, 1950s era men living in the Hollywood maelstrom. They are antiquated, casual racists, macho, and chauvinistic. Sure, not characteristics that are valued/praised in 2019, but the film takes place in 1969, post-Summer of Love, when the Hollywood system (and America as a whole) was changing.
    In many ways this film reminds me of The Wild Bunch, another great, yet sad film about men past their prime.
    And I know a lot of folks have remarked that the film isn't about anything.
    Again, it's about 2 men coming to terms with their Hollywood mortality.
    There are so many grreat scenes in this film, so much great, natural dialogue, and lots of subtle digs (the commentary about what kind of men Sharon Tate is attracted to was a nice dig at Polanski's pedophilic history; playing "Mrs Robinson" when Cliff first sees Pussy Cat was a nice flip on the script that the song is about).
    I plan to snag a DVD or at least watch it again when it streams as I am curious about all the films that are playing in the cinemas in the background and all the real films that are name dropped.
    BTW, Sergio Corbucci, whom the Al Pacino character calls the "second greatest director of Spaghetti Westerns", was a real dude and he directed some bonafide classics of the genre. Totally worth checking out if you have never seen his stuff.

    He directed the original DJANGO with Franco Nero. A MUST SEE.

    His other notable classic is THE GREAT SILENCE.

    And COMPANEROS, again starring Franco Nero.

    And he directed Burt Reynolds in NAVAJO JOE (worth seeing just for the kitsch factor of Reynolds as a Native American, but other than that it's not that great and, sadly, an example of how even the Italians used white actors in face paint to portray Native Americans and Mexicans).

    The Mercenary, the poster of which is all over background scenes in OUATIH, is also his (I have not seen this one, though).
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

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