Page 7 of 10 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 LastLast
Results 151 to 175 of 226
  1. #151
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Gaperville, CO
    Posts
    3,599
    My job isn't my passion. But it is something I can feel good most days about donating a huge portion of my life to because I believe in the mission, the work is often interesting, the people are rarely assholes, the pay/benefits is sufficient, most weeks I don't need to go over 40hr, and job security is ridiculous. And frankly given I entered the job market during the Great Recession I feel pretty damn lucky to be in such a position.

    Fuck if I know what my "passion" is after I left academia. I now like skiing, biking, hiking with the pup, reading, gardening and traveling. Wouldn't want to work in any of those, and what I saw in academia made me nope out of there.

    Upside is my partners passion is computer science. She's teaching at a local university now while finishing the Ph.D. Already has much higher earning potential than I ever will but hasn't felt need to cash out on it...yet.

  2. #152
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by ncskier View Post
    I think some of you live in horribly depressed job markets. My nephew just graduated from unc charlotte. A good but not great school. Starting salary at BofA 75k. 20k sign on bonus. Puts his 40 hours in and goes home. He will have to get mba at some point, but for now fuck passion. Heís 22 pays $800 month in rent and is saving a ton of money.
    My other niece is a nurse anesthetist. 25 makes $150k a year. Works 3 12 hour days. Picks up prn days at an outpatient surgery center for extra money. Bought a nice house with big down payment.
    This is all in poor old North Carolina. Maybe some here should have skipped English degrees and fly tying classes.
    You seem to be angry being poor.
    I know a ton of pharma reps making 150k plus who barely work 25 hours a week.
    Virtue signalling.

  3. #153
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    5,980
    Quote Originally Posted by fastfred View Post
    I have other places picked out, can't tell you cause I don't want everyone to move there and "ruin it" like they did to the town I live in now
    I'm just bent out of shape because simple beat me to one of the spots I picked
    Ha...I'm actually down to only one place that in Colorado that fits the appropriately in the "Awesome/Affordable/Quiet/Still Pay Your Bills" matrix. I should know within the next year what the options are depending on the wife's employment situations. If you snaps, says "fuck it" and quits then the future in uncertain for better or for worse.

  4. #154
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Before
    Posts
    20,456
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    I don't know. What I do know is we need an educated society and we need our young people to learn marketable job skills.
    The thrust of higher education for some time has been morphing a trade school philosophy, one based on developing marketable skills.

    I think that's a mistake. I think the objective of education should be a lot broader than that, to expose people to history, to the philosophies on which the Constitution is based. To exercise scientific methods in a variety of mediums, to put people in a position to react to changes in scientific paradigms, to changes in markets, to develop new markets.

    The US has been a technical leader, creating markets for infra red technologies, solid state devices, computers and solar energy because of focus on scientific liberal arts like chemistry, physics and math in the 50s and 60s. The thing that concerns me is that a drift away from liberal arts and science in US education will have us yielding that leadership.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  5. #155
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Ogden
    Posts
    5,511
    Quote Originally Posted by Buster Highmen View Post
    So do you think this morphing is good?
    Overall for the health of society? No. But for the individual? Maybe in the short term. I know what my capacity was as a twenty-something.

  6. #156
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Posts
    4,903
    Quote Originally Posted by Buster Highmen View Post
    The thing that concerns me is that a drift away from liberal arts and science in US education will have us yielding that leadership.
    Just sell name brand drugs and make bank, bro. The rent-seeking economy is where it's at.

  7. #157
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Under the bridge, down by the river
    Posts
    4,611
    My job is caring for dying people. As part of that work there is a lot of life review, reflecting on experiences, thinking about family and making meaning, etc. Certain themes emerge from folksó the importance of family, being kind, service, etcóbut no one says they wish they made more money, or they wish they worked more. No one talks about materials that they value, while the joy of experiences comes up frequently. Iíve cared for some seriously impressive people who have changed their corner of the world, but the themes are always the same.

    That being said, I love my work and what I do. Maybe on my deathbed it wonít matter, but it matters now.

  8. #158
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Before
    Posts
    20,456
    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    Overall for the health of society? No. But for the individual? Maybe in the short term. I know what my capacity was as a twenty-something.
    Regarding the individual, given your current career, do you think your life would have been more enriched by a liberal arts education, with all the attendant flakiness, skirt chasing, drug consumption and nose thumbing at convention or by a vocational school teaching you stuff about your current position? What impact would that have had on the community?
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  9. #159
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Before
    Posts
    20,456
    Quote Originally Posted by Bromontane View Post
    Just sell name brand drugs and make bank, bro. The rent-seeking economy is where it's at.
    Your sarcastic veneer is thin, my man.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  10. #160
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    1,841
    Quote Originally Posted by Buster Highmen View Post
    So do you think this morphing is good?
    bad/good is somewhat irrelevant; as long as the middle class in the US stagnates and declines the market for the effective luxury that is 4-6 years of general purpose college education will decline. like most other things in this country a classical education will become concentrated in the wealthy and they will take further ownership of things like history and historical thought. Yes, life can be better with luxury.

  11. #161
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    17,794
    Quote Originally Posted by Harry View Post
    I'm one of those. I am in my 60's and I tried being retired, then tried being semi-retired (consultant for my former company) and I found I did not enjoy it. I went back to work in a totally different field, started at the bottom and now run the show. I found that the social aspect of work is what I enjoy. Interacting with my coworkers and the public is why I keep working.
    this ^^ is fairly common from retired guys I have talked to, it would seem the qualities that get someone retired (showing up & working hard) are not good for staying retired and the people who havent worked long enough to retire can always tell you what they would do but they have no clue ... so alot of folks just go back to work

    after getting the full package at 49 I took a year to just be man

    To answer the big questions like what do i do now & how the fuck am I gona survive on 1/2 the $ they were paying me?

    turns out the money was never a problem cuz I have always been frugal enough, after moving west to the mountains i realized being a ski bum might be a good job except terms and conditions were not apparent, cuz when all them college boys were out balling frat girls I was working ... it took 4 years to figure out how to be a ski bum
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  12. #162
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Posts
    10,760
    I feel lucky as shit, especially after reading this thread. If I were giving advice, Iíd repeat this, itís basically my story coupled with some real good fortune on my part:
    Quote Originally Posted by ACH View Post
    Pffft, every job comes with a shit sammich.
    I think the key is in finding something that you can actually do well, that holds a modicum of interest, with people you like and can get along with.
    I did manage to stumble into a college major that was a perfect ticket punch. Now Iíve moved into a post-employment phase of my life. Itís cool for me.
    Jesus rides beside me, he never buys any smokes.

  13. #163
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Before
    Posts
    20,456
    Quote Originally Posted by dunfree View Post
    bad/good is somewhat irrelevant; as long as the middle class in the US stagnates and declines the market for the effective luxury that is 4-6 years of general purpose college education will decline. like most other things in this country a classical education will become concentrated in the wealthy and they will take further ownership of things like history and historical thought. Yes, life can be better with luxury.
    Your sarcastic veneer is thicker.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  14. #164
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    5,980
    Regarding the individual, given your current career, do you think your life would have been more enriched by a liberal arts education, with all the attendant flakiness, skirt chasing, drug consumption and nose thumbing at convention or by a vocational school teaching you stuff about your current position? What impact would that have had on the community?
    I value my education by that is the perspective of a of someone that was fortunate no graduate with minimal loans into an economy where being self-sufficient and paying my bills as a young 20 something was relatively easy compared to today.

    That is part of the challenge that has been created for young people. It is becoming so difficult to be working class that it is hard to take the time to figure out what you want to be.

  15. #165
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Wet and Mild
    Posts
    4,653
    Quote Originally Posted by Buster Highmen View Post
    The thrust of higher education for some time has been morphing a trade school philosophy, one based on developing marketable skills.

    I think that's a mistake. I think the objective of education should be a lot broader than that, to expose people to history, to the philosophies on which the Constitution is based. To exercise scientific methods in a variety of mediums, to put people in a position to react to changes in scientific paradigms, to changes in markets, to develop new markets.

    The US has been a technical leader, creating markets for infra red technologies, solid state devices, computers and solar energy because of focus on scientific liberal arts like chemistry, physics and math in the 50s and 60s. The thing that concerns me is that a drift away from liberal arts and science in US education will have us yielding that leadership.
    Thanks for doing a better job articulating the point I was trying to make several posts earlier.
    Doesn't mean that much to me, to mean that much to you.

  16. #166
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    a poop plant
    Posts
    2,913
    Interesting thread. I think the job/passion thing is very rare. Might even be that only certain personality types can ever truly achieve that. I know a mag who skis for a living. Skis on his days off. Then skis until the last patch of snow is gone after the job is over. I love to ski, but that's too much of one thing for me. So maybe most people just don't have anything in their life that they are truly that "passionate" about? I think most people are lucky if they just get a "my work is ok and no one's yelling at me" kind of job.

    I've had two very different careers. One in public sector IT and one in land development. In both, I've only ever felt good about my work when I was in a team environment interacting with people to meet a common goal. It doesn't seem to matter what the subject matter is. I'm like Harry. I need the interaction.

    As far as education, I told both of my kids: you can be a fashion designer or mow lawns or whatever else it is you want to do, but you'll do it with a degree. To me, an education makes you better at critical thinking. And life's just more interesting when you know more about the world. If you end up loving business and get an MBA and make a bunch of money, great, but that's pretty meaningless to me. I know some miserable rich people.

  17. #167
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Before
    Posts
    20,456
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    I value my education by that is the perspective of a of someone that was fortunate no graduate with minimal loans into an economy where being self-sufficient and paying my bills as a young 20 something was relatively easy compared to today.

    That is part of the challenge that has been created for young people. It is becoming so difficult to be working class that it is hard to take the time to figure out what you want to be.
    Yeah, kollledge is ridiculously expensive now, but I'm not going to be convinced that the trade school approach so one can get a job is really the path to more wealth let alone a better life or society. At the root, the issue is cost of education and poorly distributed wealth density.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  18. #168
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    4,148
    Quote Originally Posted by GiBo View Post
    I know some miserable rich people.
    I know a bunch. It's definitely not the answer to being happy. It may relieve one aspect of stress in your life and in some cases it actually may add to it. Keepin' up with the Joneses an all creates stress and they don't even realize it's happening.

  19. #169
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    2,239
    Quote Originally Posted by CantDog View Post
    but no one says they wish they made more money, or they wish they worked more.
    There are lots of people who wish they had more money (sure, duh) but there are only a few who wish they made more money.

    Subtle but very true in my experience. Thatís all I can add to this discussion.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  20. #170
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    General Sherman's Favorite City
    Posts
    18,181
    Quote Originally Posted by Carl_Mega View Post
    Virtue signalling.
    No, virtue signalling is telling everyone you will be in the office billing hours on Christmas morning if anyone needs you.
    I still call it The Jake.

  21. #171
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    17,794
    At some point you got enough money but the bigger issue with retirement is Validation ... suddenly you don't have any
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  22. #172
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    79
    Quote Originally Posted by jackstraw View Post
    I know a bunch. It's definitely not the answer to being happy. It may relieve one aspect of stress in your life and in some cases it actually may add to it. Keepin' up with the Joneses an all creates stress and they don't even realize it's happening.

    When I was married, my wife and I made very good money. Every year, 8 weekends at the beach and 8 weekends skiing. Fought like crazy. I was overweight and unhappy.

    Divorced now for 4 years. Have an even better relationship with my son. I am having a rough patch in my career. Living life. Smiling. Doing great with keeping weight off. Much happier.

    My lesson- stop chasing money. Does money buy material things? Sure it does. Is it the end all of be all? Not a chance.

    Happiness....it's an inside job. (I stole that from Online Ceramics)
    I ski the east.

  23. #173
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the ham
    Posts
    6,169
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    At some point you got enough money but the bigger issue with retirement is Validation ... suddenly you don't have any
    That's interesting. What exactly do you mean by that?

  24. #174
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    9,994
    "If External Validation is wrong - I don't wanna be right"



    Does anything feel better?

  25. #175
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    underground
    Posts
    597
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    At some point you got enough money but the bigger issue with retirement is Validation ... suddenly you don't have any
    Unless you use your free time for something useful, applying those skills you once did for fun or money to something else--SAR, the local ambulance, helping rebuild the orphanage at Manzanar. People who need but cannot find validation seem to lack imagination more than anything.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •