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  1. #1
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    Great Boeing 737 max analysis

    I've watched lots of this guy's videos, and he is smart as hell. But check this video out around the cause of 737max crashes.

    sigless.

  2. #2
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    dude's hilarious.

  3. #3
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    I smell poutine!!!
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    The hangle of the dangle.

  4. #4
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    Yeah, he's hilarious. I posted one of his videos in another thread where he takes apart a magic wand "personal massager" thats designed to chooch at a certain rate. Funny as hell.

    sent from Utah.
    sigless.

  5. #5
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    Unfortunately his videos are a huge rabbit hole. You just try and watch only one of them.

  6. #6
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    Couldn't watch the whole thing - too many things wrong.

    But I do enjoy his Canadian Cockney.

  7. #7
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    Just curious what you found wrong. I know the planes had two sensors where he says they had 1, but my understanding is it only took one to fail to cause the condition, so having 2 effectively doubled the possibility of trouble rather than halving it as you might think. Beyond that I don't know what was wrong with it but I am far from an expert.

  8. #8
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    "Like a shit brick house." I love that guy's nonsense. His handiwork and opinions barely register, I could listen to him all day.

    The relevant analysis goes by "FMEA"(Failure Mode Effects Analysis) and it's fundamentally systemic. Looking at things like redundancy and anti-redundancy and every weird thing that shows up when any specific part fails. But tearing apart a component is a better backdrop for that accent. No one takes FMEA people seriously if they end with "keep your dick in a vise!" Maybe that's what's wrong with the world.

  9. #9
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    I believe that he is taken seriously (and did correct his single AoA sesor with text on the video).
    Check out his analysis of the FIU bridge collapse.
    Dude a smart fuckin canuck.
    https://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/f...tuber-10186504
    sigless.

  10. #10
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    Ok maybe I should have said "no one who matters..." I mean he definitely is taken seriously by a lot of people who know a lot of stuff and I have a lot of respect for his expertise myself...as long as I'm watching YouTube (aka as long as I don't matter!)

    But while I'm being critical: what's his beef with skateboard bearings? If they're stronger than what's needed that size is always cheapest--even if you skip the local board shop and go for some high tolerance version.

  11. #11
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    He was happy they used skateboard bearings, but surprised they weren't identifiable (i.e. stamped with a brand name and part #) is the way I saw it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by basinbeater View Post
    I believe that he is taken seriously (and did correct his single AoA sesor with text on the video).
    Check out his analysis of the FIU bridge collapse.
    Dude a smart fuckin canuck.
    https://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/f...tuber-10186504
    fuck yer hat

    you get an inch of wood...

  13. #13
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    Dude is hilarious. I was working on the truck one day and actually fixed something based on one of his vids. Can’t remember at the moment what it was.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    He was happy they used skateboard bearings, but surprised they weren't identifiable (i.e. stamped with a brand name and part #) is the way I saw it.
    You're right. I guess what caught me odd about it was the assumption that small parts would necessarily be marked on the part--expecting that on bolts? Shirley knows 20 years ago the part number went on a little bag and maybe some record sheet. Trail of tears, indeed.

  15. #15
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    Skateboard bearings are so reliable that they also use them for fidget spinners.. So, they got that going for them too..
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  16. #16
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    I'll do this in two parts.

    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    I know the planes had two sensors where he says they had 1, but my understanding is it only took one to fail to cause the condition, so having 2 effectively doubled the possibility of trouble rather than halving it as you might think. Beyond that I don't know what was wrong with it but I am far from an expert.
    There's an old saying in aviation WRT single vs twin engine airplanes that goes along the lines of 'another engine just doubles your chance of an engine failure'.

    But even if that's true, the outcomes will be vastly different.

    I'm not an engineer, but IMO the MCAS should require both AoAs to agree that the critical angle of attack is being approached before intervening.

    When one AoA is malfunctioning, one pilot is seeing garbage information, but the other is seeing it right. To add to the shit-show, one of the stick shakers is likely activated (def a crap your pants moment). In all previous versions of the 737 it was the pilots' jobs to decipher which side was right.

    A simple equation for that is Attitude + Power = Performance. The guy who sees the performance (climbing/descending, accelerating/slowing) that agrees with his pitch indication and the power setting has the good info. That pilot can take (or retain) control, and fly the airplane back to the airport. Remember, in this scenario (without mcas intervening) there's nothing wrong with the aircraft other than one pilot's indications.

    With the mcas only getting info from one AoA sensor, there's a chance its intervention will be wrong.
    Last edited by Ted Striker; 06-25-2019 at 04:27 PM. Reason: clarity

  17. #17
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    part duex

    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    Just curious what you found wrong.
    So I watched the whole thing.

    I know he’s just using it as a prop, but he missed the crux of the matter: the AoA sensor itself isn’t the problem. The problem is that the whole point of the doomsday machine is lost if you keep it a secret.

    Let’s say Audi put imbedded software into the new version of your wagon that sensed lane departures, and corrected them via automated steering input, but decided not to publish any info about it. The dealership doesn’t know. There’s nothing in the owner’s manual. The online forums haven’t caught wind of it. And most of all, you don’t know because you have decades of experience keeping your car between the lines, so you never trigger it. Except there’s a little flaw in the implementation… if the right signal light burns out, the car will suddenly - inexplicably to you - turn left. And when you correct via steering input, it seems like you have regained control, but then it does it again.

    Boeing committed two sins. The first is the obvious lack of redundancy (there were already two AoA vanes on the aircraft), and the second is not getting the information out to the people who needed it.

    He almost gets it with his comments on training, but it’s a near miss because it has nothing to do with airlines being cheap. It’s that what are they going to train? There was no info in the FCOM, FCTM or QRH (pilot manuals), no info provided to training depts and check pilots for addition to the regular syllabus, and none of the simulators had the software anyway.

    Getting back to AoA sensor, he also missed what’s on the other end. The reason the “super” Herc has four is that it has all sorts of upgraded state of the art avionics. Each of those four feeds a different system/display/computer. The “regular” C130 with it’s old-school steam-powered dials only has two.

    You could put ten of them on a 737, but eight wouldn’t have anything to connect to.

    He gets a lot of technical stuff wrong too (like the engines aren’t made by Rolls Royce, they’re CFM LEAPs) but I’m not going to rewatch it for the sake of quibbles.

  18. #18
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    Keep your dick in a vice.

  19. #19
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    His videos are definitely addictive. And informative. I now know that I'd buy a Harbor Freight grinder instead of a decent one for my uses. Surprising.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by riser3 View Post
    Keep your dick in a vice.

    yer advice sucks....



  21. #21
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    Seems to me the lawyers have quite a few sins for Boeing. From the Max development, release and management to the whistleblowers on other programs like the SC Dreamliners there seems to be a pattern of unethical - maybe illegal - conduct. It'll take a decade to know where we stand today on those things though.

  22. #22
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    Great Boeing 737 max analysis

    my seattle info is really dated but a running joke with the locals (south of Seattle) that it was a wonder planes didnít fall out of the sky given the shape of the employees on any given Monday morning


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    Last edited by DBdude; 06-26-2019 at 02:22 PM. Reason: ADD

  23. #23
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    https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/faa...risk-1.5191416

    they are not sayinh what the new problem is but it will have to be fixed in addition to
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  24. #24
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    Could existing units be turned into cargo planes if production stops and not used for commercial passenger?


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  25. #25
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    If they solve the problem (or problems), I'm sure they could, but if they solve the problems they'd still be used for passengers I would imagine.

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