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  1. #1001
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    [a] Van [down by the river]
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    1,307
    Quote Originally Posted by huckbucket View Post
    My Gravelking SKs are living up to their great reputation. I ride a mix of road, gravel and single track at between 35 and 40 psi tubeless. 700x37
    this.

    I run them as my everything tire (road/cx/whatever) all fall/winter. They roll fast on concrete which is a huge plus.

    also:
    Quote Originally Posted by chaka View Post
    Let's talk leg warmers... I've tried Pearl Izumi, Endura, and Gore. I've been impressed by the Gore wind stoppers for the last several years (commuting, xc, cx etc) but am looking for something with a bit more wet weather resistance. I know nothing will survive full on downpours.
    What are you trying to accomplish? For me, let warmers are to break the wind off the legs. So either it's cold and dry, and they break the wind, keeping your legs warm... or it's windy and wet, in which case, probably no leg warmers are going to keep your legs dry, but at least they stay warm.

    If it's raining, I'm generally in the mindset that I'm going to get wet regardless, so I layer with that in mind and focus on keeping myself warm, not necessarily dry. That said, I'm especially sweaty when riding a bike, so I'm wet normally anyway?

    That all said, the nano flex castelli stuff has been great. I've had a pair of leg warmers forever which have served me well. A bit of water resistance to keep the puddle splashed away. If it's raining, I usually just go 3/4 length tights under the bibs (or knee warmers or 3/4 thermals), velotoze (they are fiddly, but great), and just embrace the wet.

  2. #1002
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Missoula
    Posts
    1,540
    I try to avoid riding in the rain, but if it happens I mostly just accept that I'm going to be wet. I have some thermal PI knee warmers and leg warmers plus some gore knee warmers that are a thinner, more windproof material. Not sure there's much you can do outside of full fenders and rain gear and riding slow enough to not become too much of a sweaty mess. I do pack a light rain jacket (OR helium) if the weather is looking iffy and I'll be out for awhile. Last year I did do a thing where I wore a gore tex shell the whole time, and despite it being like 40 and raining that kept me fairly comfortable along with ski glove shells over my light gloves. Then I just had leg warmers and thermal shoe covers.

    Recently got some PI full bib tights that are very nice on the cold days. They have some sort of a dwr coating but I assume they'll wind up pretty saturated if I try riding in a full downpour. I suppose that castelli ros, or gore cycling stuff might be worth checking out for better weather resistance.

    Speaking of those cold days, nice to not just ride the trainer all the time

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  3. #1003
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    2,187
    Am I the only one here who had trouble getting leg warmers to stay up on the leg? Mine would always slide down. Pearl izumi's. Returned them. I've had no issue with their arm warmers or sun sleeves. Try different brands? Hold them up with hockey garters? I don't recall specifically but I'm sure I tried tucking them under the legs of my spandex shorts.

  4. #1004
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Missoula
    Posts
    1,540
    Leg/knee warmers go on first and under the shorts/bibs, and you've got to get them way up. And even then if the warmers and your shorts aren't tight enough they could slide down.

  5. #1005
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Cuntecticut
    Posts
    1,650
    Quote Originally Posted by jamal View Post
    Leg/knee warmers go on first and under the shorts/bibs, and you've got to get them way up. And even then if the warmers and your shorts aren't tight enough they could slide down.


    this. i dearly wish ibex was still the ibex that was, and was still making the el fito knickers. sigh.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  6. #1006
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    the most beautiful place in the whole wide world
    Posts
    1,822
    yeah, I hear the 'embrace the wet' mantra. when it's wet... its wet. I'd like a little DWR on the Gore Windstopper pair, just to delay the saturation when its not pouring just road spray, light sprinkles. I'll check out the nanoflex. Or maybe I'll just spray treat my Gores...

  7. #1007
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,874
    Quote Originally Posted by jamal View Post
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    This road looks amazing and very Missoula-esque. Still looking for more of these in the Kalispell area - there appear to be a ton of great gravel up north of Whitefish. Speaking of which, are you coming this direction to ride "The Last Best Ride" next year?

  8. #1008
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,011
    Just hopping in - that Last Best Ride sounds fun and could be a faster/racier compliment to the Pancake Ride earlier in the summer. Any idea what the route is for the Last Best Ride?

  9. #1009
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    703
    I thought it sounded good, until I saw it was $175 (IIRC). I think the route is gravel from Whitefish to Polebridge (can't remember the creek, think Haskill road to north of CF). Then return via Tour Divide Route into Whitefish (Red Meadow to Upper WF Lake and back).

    I'm all for supporting local ride/races, but that is $50-75 too much.

  10. #1010
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,874
    It's pricey for sure. I signed up with a co-worker and am looking forward to having something to train for. If nothing else I'm excited to see some gravel in my neck of the woods - will likely give me some ideas for future rides.

    If anybody does sign up let me know - I'd be interested in putting some faces to names.

    Seth

    Sent from my SM-N970U using Tapatalk

  11. #1011
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,011
    It's def pricey, but if there's good food during and after, race support, and I get to learn a new zone I can kind of talk myself into it. Will def let you know if I sign up.

  12. #1012
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Missoula
    Posts
    1,540
    I'm aware of it but haven't looked at the details. Have been meaning to do the pancake ride and also get up that way more often. I usually go up to Polson for the speedwagon race in the spring, that one is great.

  13. #1013
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    6,554
    Quote Originally Posted by chaka View Post
    yeah, I hear the 'embrace the wet' mantra. when it's wet... its wet. I'd like a little DWR on the Gore Windstopper pair, just to delay the saturation when its not pouring just road spray, light sprinkles. I'll check out the nanoflex. Or maybe I'll just spray treat my Gores...
    Technically, it would be asking a lot for rain gear to keep anyone dry on a bike. I mean there's the sweat aspect to consider and I can't imagine even the most breathable material working well on a climb or at speed. I think about rain gear as "slowing" the cold creep. In other words, it should ward off the intrusion of cold water enough to keep the water next to your skin warm. Good materials slow it more. It's harder at the extremities of course.

  14. #1014
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    the most beautiful place in the whole wide world
    Posts
    1,822
    Quote Originally Posted by huckbucket View Post
    Technically, it would be asking a lot for rain gear to keep anyone dry on a bike. I mean there's the sweat aspect to consider and I can't imagine even the most breathable material working well on a climb or at speed. I think about rain gear as "slowing" the cold creep. In other words, it should ward off the intrusion of cold water enough to keep the water next to your skin warm. Good materials slow it more. It's harder at the extremities of course.
    yep. Agree. I rarely expect/hope to stay actually dry... unless I'm puttering over to the pub and back.

    Last Best Ride looks sweet. I love WF and would love to check out some of the local backroads there.... hmmm....

  15. #1015
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    home
    Posts
    995
    Quote Originally Posted by scrublover View Post
    this. i dearly wish ibex was still the ibex that was, and was still making the el fito knickers. sigh.
    I feel you. My stockpile from the old ibex garage sales is down to my final pair of el fitos (had 3 to start) and the seams around the chamois are blowing apart. Wearing shorts over them keeps the wind out for now, but I made need grief counciling when they finally fall apart.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Perfer et obdura, hic dolor olim utior tibi. -Ovid

  16. #1016
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    6,554

  17. #1017
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Squaw valley
    Posts
    3,124
    So you guys riding gravel bikes, do you ride mostly on fire roads?

    And why a gravel bike instead of a mountain bike?

    Sent from my Redmi Note 8 Pro using Tapatalk

  18. #1018
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Missoula
    Posts
    1,540
    Why would I ride a mountain bike on roads? The cx/gravel bike is lighter, faster, more efficient.

    Plus you have to get to that dirt, my gravel ride the other day was probably 20 miles of pavement for a 35mi ride, the rest forest road with a little bit of singletrack thrown in.

  19. #1019
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,011
    Yep, you use them all over. It’s overly simplistic but think of it this way: they’re nearly as fast as road bikes on pavement, faster than road and mtn bikes on gravel and forest service roads, and make mellow singletrack fun as hell. If your ride can have some or all those elements on it then a gravel bike is the most efficient option. If your ride is almost all pavement or just singletrack then a road or mtn bike probably makes more sense.

  20. #1020
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    6,554
    Quote Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post
    So you guys riding gravel bikes, do you ride mostly on fire roads?

    And why a gravel bike instead of a mountain bike?

    Sent from my Redmi Note 8 Pro using Tapatalk
    I came from road riding exclusively. So my gravel bike opens up new roads (gravel) without sacrificing that road experience. Has kept my love of biking fresh and safe (obvs gravel and dirt roads get less traffic). I do still like to use it on single track every once in a while to keep my skills sharp. If you're wondering about the opportunities for exploration near you, just fire up gravelmaps

  21. #1021
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Missoula
    Posts
    1,540
    Bike season's still going, might even see what the trails look like

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