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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
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    9

    Pushing my limits

    I've plateaued a bit with skiing and I'm looking for some trips next year to push my limits, and due to some nice circumstances I'll have a little money to play around with next year. I'm looking for some advice on where I should spend my time (and money) in order to see the most improvement in my skiing and I see a couple of different things I can do:

    (1) Inbounds ski clinics in the US, like the JH steep and deep program, or the ski clinic run out of big sky. Would have loved to do the gordy camps but seems like they're done

    (2) "Steep ski camps international" run out of La Grave in France, with more of a ski mountaineering focus

    (3) Few days to 1 week cat or heli trip somewhere

    Goals for the trip are: learn to ski super steep stuff confidently and at speed (50 - 65 degree stuff), straight line some chutes and up my hucking game from the dumb 5ft rocks I'm comfortable with now.

    I get about 50 days/year around Tahoe and I have a bit of mountaineering and BC experience already.

    What are your thoughts on what trips/experiences are best to push your limits, learn good technique, and ski some sick lines.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    31
    Where is your limit at right now and what is your home mountain? What your current ability level is highly impacts what you need to do to improve.

    If you are wanting to get the best bang for your buck avoid doing something like a heli/cat trip. Those trips have to cater to the worst skier in the group and there is no guarantee you will get to ski the terrain you want. Also when you are trying to improve you need to get in a lot of reps and that won't happen on a cat/heli trip.

    I found an instructor I liked a lot at a steeps clinic that helped me out a lot. One thing she emphasized is to practice skiing in shitty snow. Especially practice skiing difficult terrain in shitty snow. If you get your technique where you handle shitty snow comfortably, you will rip the shit out of it on a good day.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,552
    A week at JH, Alta or Snowbird with private instruction would be money well spent. Call up their ski schools and tell them what youíre after.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Sandy
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    1,063
    Quote Originally Posted by PNW-skier78 View Post
    One thing she emphasized is to practice skiing in shitty snow. Especially practice skiing difficult terrain in shitty snow. If you get your technique where you handle shitty snow comfortably, you will rip the shit out of it on a good day.
    This is true. I find that if I really focus on my technique and fundamentals in techy terrain on bad days, it helps immensely when the snow is good.

    I've also thought of doing one of these camps, will follow this thread along for advice.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    A LSD Steakhouse somewhere in the Wasatch
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    10,792
    id bbi it
    them fuckos will push your limits
    "When the child was a child it waited patiently for the first snow and it still does"- Van "The Man" Morrison
    "I find I have already had my reward, in the doing of the thing" - Buzz Holmstrom
    "THIS IS WHAT WE DO"-AML -
    ski on in eternal peace

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
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    5,968
    Goals for the trip are: learn to ski super steep stuff confidently and at speed (50 - 65 degree stuff)
    The first thing I suggest you do in purchase an inclinometer for change your name to Pierre or Anselme.

    Second, be honest with yourself about your current skills. Many skiers these days have a poor technical foundation. Really good skiers have really good fundamentals.

    Third, backcountry and mountaineering no not equal freeride. Figure out what your objective is and focus on that.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8,972
    Move to the east for two years, buy a pair of unrockered skis and ski every hard trail on the hill. You'll get instant feedback if you're doing anything wrong. The hero snow out west won't help you progress. I have a pair of 191cm unrockered Mantras you can borrow.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    PNWET
    Posts
    3,635
    Internet has tons of technical drills to refine your foundation of basic movements. Video of your skiing is humbling and a way to isolate your counter productive movements. Skiing steeps and variable conditions only help when you have a strong foundation first.
    https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=3982&dateline=1279375  363

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    4,845
    Push it to the limit

    https://youtu.be/3-3Yok5D3Aw

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Wet and Mild
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    4,635
    This thread is soy as fuck.
    Doesn't mean that much to me, to mean that much to you.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Roadtrippin': to Summit County
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    1,891
    Quote Originally Posted by soyboy80 View Post
    I've plateaued a bit....
    To cure that, sometimes all you need is to mix up your ski partners. If you try skiing with new friends that you don't usually ski with, that might re-spark your motivation to keep progressing and working on new skills, whether self-taught or accepting tips from others.

    Quote Originally Posted by soyboy80 View Post
    Goals for the trip are: learn to ski super steep stuff confidently and at speed (50 - 65 degree stuff), straight line some chutes and up my hucking game from the dumb 5ft rocks I'm comfortable with now.

    I get about 50 days/year around Tahoe...
    I'm not an instructor, but if you want to ski Squaw with me next year, I will give you some structure to actually "work" on your goals at Squaw, instead of just following your heart all day for unstructured fun on the mountain. My main approach is just start small, and work your way up in small increments...5ft rock, then 8ft, then 12, 15, 20, etc. Heck, there's even a Squallywood book that makes it easy to know where to go to step it up incrementally. Sometimes my friends quit skiing at 2pm, then I continue skiing solo to "work" on my progression from 2pm-4pm. (NOTE: I don't think I can teach you to ski at speed at 65-degrees and then stop on a dime...but maybe you can work on trying to stick slow pedal hop turns on it, or straight-line it.)

    After working on it and getting on top of your game at your home mountain, you'll be in better position to choose which exotic trip you want next.

    .
    - TRADE your heavy BILLYGOATS or PROTESTS for my lightweight versions at this thread

    "My biggest goal in life has always been to pursue passion and to make dreams a reality. I love my daughter, but if I had to quit my passions for her, then I would be setting the wrong example for her, and I would not be myself anymore. " -Shane

    "I'm gonna go SO OFF that NO ONE's ever gonna see what I'm gonna do!" -Saucerboy

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    9
    answering some questions asked up thread:

    1) Home mountain is squaw & alpine, split time evenly between the two of them.

    2) Runs that are just beyond my range: keyhole/idiots delight at alpine, The level 4+ difficulty squallywood lines (have done a few l3s), or the squallywood lines that require airs more than 5ft, which is almost all of them lol. Below this level, i feel confident and things seem "easy", but at this level, I feel like im going to shit my pants and die.

    3) I learned to ski out east, have plenty of experience on 30 degree ice rinks.

    Thanks for the input so far. Sounds like a few days of regular old lessons at squaw/alpine would help refine my base technique, and a steep clinic somewhere would help me push myself further. Anyone have any advice on a specific clinic they attended that they thought was awesome?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    8,169
    Quote Originally Posted by soyboy80 View Post
    (3) Few days to 1 week cat or heli trip somewhere.
    As fun as it would be, this ain't the answer. A guide's job is not really to push the limits of his clients in steep terrain. Lowest common denominator of the group will set the pace.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    slc
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    10,286
    Quote Originally Posted by soyboy80 View Post
    Goals for the trip are: learn to ski super steep stuff confidently and at speed (50 - 65 degree stuff)
    LOFL

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    17,643
    come north where yer dollar goes further, if you have a DUI maybe not

    http://capow.ca/

    maybe these guys ?
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    DownEast
    Posts
    192
    Find a race program and run gates. Seriously. A 15meter slalom ski on hardback with gates in the snow will expose your weaknesses and tighten your shit up real fast.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    38
    Definitely go to a "Steep Skiing Camp" . It will blow you away. Looks like they run camps in Chamonix and La Grave. When I went to La Grave in '98 I stayed at "la Chaumine" - the skiers lodge" where they also based out of although I believe they utilize a town hotel now. I also stayed at the Hotel Edelweiss. There is so much skiing in the region you should plan on staying longer then just the week. I suppose that there is still a large expat community in La Grave. Hook up with some of them when the camp concludes. Within a short drive there are Alpe d'Huez, Briancon and Montegenevra with endless off piste possibilities.

    Caution alert:. You seem young and ambitious. Stay safe over there. People die, even the experienced ones.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    480
    Quote Originally Posted by soyboy80 View Post
    Goals for the trip are: learn to ski super steep stuff confidently and at speed (50 - 65 degree stuff)...
    If you're going to ski 65 degrees at speed, I suggest you practice your tomahawk. WTF?

    Anyhow, my advice: ski a bunch of tight trees, and find some ski partners who are better than you - nothing makes you better faster, than trying to keep up with better skiers.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Walpole NH
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    7,843
    You guys are so easily trolled, I mean really, itís just embarrassing.
    crab in my shoe mouth

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,039
    Quote Originally Posted by PNW-skier78 View Post
    One thing she emphasized is to practice skiing in shitty snow. Especially practice skiing difficult terrain in shitty snow. If you get your technique where you handle shitty snow comfortably, you will rip the shit out of it on a good day.
    Bingo. Don't cost you nuthin', and you can hotlap because there arent lift lines on shit snow days. Plus, itll get your legs in really good shape... if you don't blow a knee first haha.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    DownEast
    Posts
    192
    Quote Originally Posted by buttahflake View Post
    You guys are so easily trolled, I mean really, it’s just embarrassing.
    I was just trying to start a racer vs. nonracer, East vs. west, whomever vs. whatever good ol' rock fight that would devolve into a shitshow. Whose trolling who?

    Go on now

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    29,762
    You're probably just going to have to wait for the new techtalk landscape.
    Quote Originally Posted by Downbound Train View Post
    And there will come a day when our ancestors look back...........

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    9
    not trolling tbh, looking for advice and have got some good stuff already (EX: don't do cat/heli trip, they have a diff purpose than pushing limits)

    I mean, yea not many people are straightlining 60 degree runs, but "at speed" on 60 degree slopes to me means linking turns, not just doing jump turns to get down.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Midgaard
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    2,692
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    The first thing I suggest you do in purchase an inclinometer for change your name to Pierre or Anselme.
    This.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    20
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LIfhbMVN3fY&t=380s

    Watch this and you will see what 60 degree looks like. Vivian Bruchez, one of the world's top steep skiers, says it's the absolute limit of what is possible to ski, and it is definitely not done at speed.

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