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Thread: Garden 2019

  1. #26
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    Iím a garden jong this year and planted a bunch of stuff early April, our nice March tricked me. Strawberries, cabbage, broccoli, cherry tomatoes, chard, spinach and most of the Romaine survived the drenching deluge that was early April. Last night got down to 35 degrees too.

    The zucchiniís and cucumbers didnít make it.

    I bought those already started plants from Home Depot.

    Next year wonít plant so early.

  2. #27
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    What zone are you in?

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK47bp View Post
    I’m a garden jong this year and planted a bunch of stuff early April, our nice March tricked me. Strawberries, cabbage, broccoli, cherry tomatoes, chard, spinach and most of the Romaine survived the drenching deluge that was early April. Last night got down to 35 degrees too.

    The zucchini’s and cucumbers didn’t make it.

    I bought those already started plants from Home Depot.

    Next year won’t plant so early.
    Grow you some daikon.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyoverland Captive View Post
    What zone are you in?
    Western Washington, cascade foothills

  5. #30
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    What zone though? 6? 7?

    https://garden.org/nga/zipzone/

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyoverland Captive View Post
    What zone though? 6? 7?

    https://garden.org/nga/zipzone/
    Zone 8b.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK47bp View Post
    Zone 8b.
    Yup. Definitely planted the cucumbers and zucchiniís too early.

    Good info. Thanks.

  8. #33
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    Ah. Iím in 6/7; nothing gets planted until Memorial Day. Gotta be conservative. And get a cold frame.

  9. #34
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    Sep 2006
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    Did DD come up with this zone method?
    Zone 5b checking in.

    But
    Gardening in the fall can be much more challenging than spring planting, because you are in a race to get your crops mature and harvested before the winter frosts begin, around October 1. .
    I see nothing about horrendous fucking hail storms mentioned.

  10. #35
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    Not a food garden, but

    Click image for larger version. 

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    45 down, 6 to go.

  11. #36
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    Jul 2002
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    Got tomatoes, 2 cukes, Japanese eggplant, ONE zucchini, several peppers in the ground, along with some herbs. Dino Kale I planted in the winter is still producing. Every couple of days I cull a few leaves and it keeps growing. Iíll see, Gardner newbie here. Red Sox suck
    Quando paramucho mi amore de felice carathon.
    Mundo paparazzi mi amore cicce verdi parasol.
    Questo abrigado tantamucho que canite carousel.


  12. #37
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    Left town for 7 days during a dry heat wave. My watering system in a timer seemed to have kept everything alive luckily, carrots are sprouting . Click image for larger version. 

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  13. #38
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    That rock looks like it will soak up and radiate a ton of heat. Great for mud seasons not sure about August.

    Anyone growing tomatillos? I'm thinking of giving them a shot this year.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rideski View Post
    Anyone growing tomatillos? I'm thinking of giving them a shot this year.
    My wife grew tomatillos a few years ago, we put in 3 plants = WAY too many. Unless you're going to be making a ton of tomatillo salsa I wouldn't bother with more than one.
    They seemed like they grew into a big bush and were really hard to harvest and a lot of them went to waste.

  15. #40
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    Interesting. Yeah I've been really geeking out on tomatillo serrano salsa, I've made about a dozen batches in the last month. I read that you have to have two plants to pollinate? Not sure why they pollinate differently than a tomato plant, but that's what I read from Burpee.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnjam View Post
    My wife grew tomatillos a few years ago, we put in 3 plants = WAY too many. Unless you're going to be making a ton of tomatillo salsa I wouldn't bother with more than one.
    They seemed like they grew into a big bush and were really hard to harvest and a lot of them went to waste.
    Bonus is they will come up on their own for a couple of years if you leave them. Less is more with tomatillos.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rideski View Post
    Interesting. Yeah I've been really geeking out on tomatillo serrano salsa, I've made about a dozen batches in the last month. I read that you have to have two plants to pollinate? Not sure why they pollinate differently than a tomato plant, but that's what I read from Burpee.
    I did purple tomatillos a few years ago. Only one plant and it did great, I had way more of the fuckers than I could handle and ended up making a couple batches of tomatillo-only salsa which was quite interesting. The plant ended up over 2' tall and fairly thick. Starting it from seed is a completely different story, I've lost 4 already this season. They sprout very fast and grow to 2" then wither away, not sure what's happening.
    Interesting fact: a tomatillo plant left in the ground over the winter will come back in the spring with a vengeance. At least in UT.

  18. #43
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    Sounds awesome on the fast growing big bounty. Sorry to hear the seeds aren't working. With our short growing season I'm totally planning on buying starter plants from a nursery. Now if I could figure out why my peppers and basil did so poorly last year right next to my tomato plant that did really well I'll be in salsa business. Thinking I may have over watered or over fertilized them. Might try a different location this year.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rideski View Post
    With our short growing season I'm totally planning on buying starter plants from a nursery. Now if I could figure out why my peppers and basil did so poorly last year..
    Struggled with same issues.

    a quick soil test might give some insight. cow manure to put beds to sleep and mature compost at planting seems to keep me dialed. Maybe some ash here and there.

    We have short season too .. a lot of crops seed inside end of feb in happy frog, they sit in S facing radiant heat floors in the sun .. graduate to larger pots, harden and go outside around 1st week of june +/-
    my peppers have done way better this way. I gave up on outside basil and pot it inside now, with great success.

    elevation, all day southern sun exposure, short season, and high winds, rocky soil.. sigh

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boissal View Post
    I did purple tomatillos a few years ago. Only one plant and it did great, I had way more of the fuckers than I could handle and ended up making a couple batches of tomatillo-only salsa which was quite interesting. The plant ended up over 2' tall and fairly thick. Starting it from seed is a completely different story, I've lost 4 already this season. They sprout very fast and grow to 2" then wither away, not sure what's happening.
    Could it be Damping Off? Too much water has killed many a seedling...
    Most seedlings can only take up something close to their mass in water in a day. After that little half-teaspoon, the primary thing water does for a seedling is displace and replace air in the soil.
    Roots need oxygen [leaves need CO2 for photosynthesis in the daytime, and oxygen for the Dark Reaction at night - roots need oxygen all the time].
    H2O2 [aka hydrogen peroxide] degrades into O2+H2O over 24-48hrs. Adding H2O2 to your water adds dissolved oxygen and pure gaseous oxygen to root zones.

    So if you suspect your seedlings are damping off - water less, and use a good shot of 3% USP hydrogen peroxide in the water when you do.


    Interesting fact: a tomatillo plant left in the ground over the winter will come back in the spring with a vengeance. At least in UT.

    Roots, man. The plant has an established root system. Rule of thumb: A plant has as much mass below ground as above.
    Under normal conditions of an outdoor garden in soil, a plant can only grow in direct proportion to its root mass. Your over-wintered tomatillos start growing more roots as soon as soil temps allow, and start snowballing with more capacity than your younger starts. Critical mass.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by highangle View Post
    Could it be Damping Off? Too much water has killed many a seedling...
    Most seedlings can only take up something close to their mass in water in a day. After that little half-teaspoon, the primary thing water does for a seedling is displace and replace air in the soil.
    Roots need oxygen [leaves need CO2 for photosynthesis in the daytime, and oxygen for the Dark Reaction at night - roots need oxygen all the time].
    H2O2 [aka hydrogen peroxide] degrades into O2+H2O over 24-48hrs. Adding H2O2 to your water adds dissolved oxygen and pure gaseous oxygen to root zones.

    So if you suspect your seedlings are damping off - water less, and use a good shot of 3% USP hydrogen peroxide in the water when you do.





    Roots, man. The plant has an established root system. Rule of thumb: A plant has as much mass below ground as above.
    Under normal conditions of an outdoor garden in soil, a plant can only grow in direct proportion to its root mass. Your over-wintered tomatillos start growing more roots as soon as soil temps allow, and start snowballing with more capacity than your younger starts. Critical mass.
    Good info here ^^^
    I would add that water in soil comes in three forms, free water slowly moving through the soil matrix, water held to particles by surface tension, and water that is chemically bound to the soil particles. Plants roots can not uptake free water, and can only uptake chemically bound water if they have symbiotic relationships with fungi. Itís the water hold to the soil by surface tension that is what most plants are able to access.

  22. #47
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    checking in from zone 1A here
    But I live in the "banana belt of Jackson" so I figure that gives me like another 1/2 zone up and then I've got an enclosed courtyard which I think gives me another 1/2 to 1 zone up
    Got lots of nice perennials coming up though- Dicentra/ Bleeding heart from my grandmother's plants in Vermont that loove it here with our coolness and stay lush all summer long

    I've given up on growing veggies though- just too much work for the miniature vegetables that I usually harvest after a summer long of daily watering/ laboring
    skid luxury

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCMtnHound View Post
    Good info here ^^^
    I would add that water in soil comes in three forms, free water slowly moving through the soil matrix, water held to particles by surface tension, and water that is chemically bound to the soil particles. Plants roots can not uptake free water, and can only uptake chemically bound water if they have symbiotic relationships with fungi. It’s the water hold to the soil by surface tension that is what most plants are able to access.

    Thanks the kind word, but I think you're off on a few things...

    Roots (leaves and stems too) absorb water and water vapor and nutrients via osmosis. No fungus required. Surface tension is important, but surface area is even more so, hence root hairs...

    There is fungus family famously involved in fixing atmospheric nitrogen to the soil in a state that plants can take up (though some plants, like legumes, can do this with and without symbiotics). And pretty much everything else a plant eats in the organic wild has to pass through a critter or two or undergo some chemical process (chelation, etc) to become "available". But anyone who uses Miracle Gro or any other non-organic or inorganic fertilizer is giving plants NPK and other elements in a form directly available to the plant. Plants can be grown in a sterile and fungus-free environment with roots completely submerged in water and fertilizer 24/7.

  24. #49
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    We've had an exceptionally wet spring here and everything I put in from seed is gone. Even the tomatoes and strawberries from last year started to come back but are gone now too. I'm going to clean up, refertilize and start over today. Hopefully it's not too late.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by highangle View Post
    Thanks the kind word, but I think you're off on a few things...

    Roots (leaves and stems too) absorb water and water vapor and nutrients via osmosis. No fungus required. Surface tension is important, but surface area is even more so, hence root hairs...

    There is fungus family famously involved in fixing atmospheric nitrogen to the soil in a state that plants can take up (though some plants, like legumes, can do this with and without symbiotics). And pretty much everything else a plant eats in the organic wild has to pass through a critter or two or undergo some chemical process (chelation, etc) to become "available". But anyone who uses Miracle Gro or any other non-organic or inorganic fertilizer is giving plants NPK and other elements in a form directly available to the plant. Plants can be grown in a sterile and fungus-free environment with roots completely submerged in water and fertilizer 24/7.
    Nothing what you said invalidates my statement. And we were talking about plants in a soil matrix, not hydroponics.

    "Three soil moisture states, saturation, field capacity and permanent wilting point are used to describe water content across different water potentials in soil and are related to the energy required to move water (or extract water from soil). When the soil is at or near saturation the direction of the potential energy gradient is downward through the soil profile or laterally down slope. This mechanism of flow by the force of gravity occurs mainly in macropores. As the soil dries, field capacity is reached after free drainage of macropores has occurred. Field capacity represents the soil water content retained against the force of gravity by matric forces (in micropores and mesopores) at tension of -0.033 MPa. As water content decreases, soil matric potential decreases, becoming more negative, and as a result, water is held more strongly to mineral surfaces due to cohesive forces between water molecules and adhesive forces associated with water and mineral particles (capillary forces). Water held between saturation and field capacity is transitory, subject to free drainage over short time periods, hence is it is generally considered unavailable to plants. This free water is termed drainable porosity. In contrast, much of the water held at field capacity is available for plant uptake and use through evapotranspiration. The point at which matric forces hold water too tightly for plant extraction (-1.5 MPa) is termed the permanent wilting point. The amount of water held between field capacity and permanent wilting point is considered plant available water (PAW). Water held between these two states is retained against the force of gravity, but not so tightly that it cannot be extracted by plants. Mesopores and micropores supply most plant available water. Water held at potentials below permanent wilting point (< -1.5 MPa) is not available for use by most plants because it strongly adheres to mineral particles. Water held at permanent wilting point is associated with partially filled micropores and hydrated surfaces of soil particles"
    Citation: O'Geen, A. T. (2012) Soil Water Dynamics. Nature Education Knowledge 3(6):12

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