Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    26

    Touring in Alpine Boots with a "Hike Mode"?

    So I'm a relatively new skier trying to get into a super budget friendly Alpine Touring setup. I recently acquired some Volkl ski's with Tyrolia Aaambition 10 bindings super cheap. I need new Alpine boots and I'd like to find a boot that can both be skied at the resort or on the skin track. I won't be doing any heavy ski mountaineering or multi-day trips. This is mainly just to get my feet wet going uphill on a skin track for some cardio before coming back downhill. My bindings work with or without tech inserts so I've been looking at various models.

    I stopped by the local boot shop and tried out a few of the options they had including the Technica Cochise and the Scarpa Freedom. These are EXPENSIVE boots even on clearance sales. They also fit quite narrow on my relatlively wide foot.

    THE QUESTION: I was wondering if there's any huge issues with using a straight up alpine boot with a generous "Hike Mode"? The Salomon QST Access 90 fit my foot quite well and the ankle mobility seemed pretty comparable to something like the Technica Cochise? Is anyone touring on an alpine boot with a walk mode? Will I hate my life?

    I know I'd be much happier with real tech bindings and boots but like I said, I'm just trying to see if I like it and want to take it further. Thanks for the advice!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    8,416
    I wouldn't call the QST Access a straight up alpine boot - true alpine boots don't have a walk mode. But to answer your question, yes, a boot like that will be fine for moderate tours. Is it as good as a more dedicated touring boot? No. Will it be better than a true alpine boot? Yes. And plenty of people tour around in true alpine boots that don't have any sort of walk mode.

    No opinions on whether the QST Access 90 is an appropriate boot for you otherwise. That's for your bootfitter to answer.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    17,794
    Besides restricted range of motion it mostly comes down to weight

    Alpine boots probably will weigh 1/2 to 1/3 more than an AT boot,

    any frame style AT binding will weigh twice as much as a tech binding

    the thing is you don't know if you will want to tour or if your situation will allow you to ... been there done that
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    196
    It's hard to hate your life when you're out walking around in the mountains. Get a boot that fits your foot and budget and give touring a try. Lots of vert has been achieved in full alpine boots clicked into some horrendous contraptions over the years, so it's certainly possible. If you find that you like touring you'll probably be looking for different skis, bindings etc anyhow, so current boot choice likely won't have much of a long term influence beyond serving as a gateway.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Spokane/Schweitzer
    Posts
    5,106
    I tour both in my fixed Lange RX 120 (no walk mode) and an older pair of Rossignol Alltrack 120 with a walk mode. I only do a couple of afternoon runs in the Langes at any given time but don't have any issues. With the Rossignols, I've done a three-day hut trip hiking all day for two of the days and other than one hot-spot that I put some moleskin on, no issues. Right now I use these primarily for a one-run trip during the week in the early morning before work but I'm going to S. Idaho for two days of touring at the end of the week and will be using the Rossis for that without any concern. Buy what you want and try it a little and if you really get hooked and want to invest more in back country, then get a full set-up with tech bindings and complimentary boots. In the meantime, you should be fine with whatever alpine boots you choose.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    26
    Thanks everyone! I wish boot manufacturers would list the "range of motion" in the specs. Some touring boots do this but it seems like none of the "walk to ride" boots do this. I went to the Boot Shop and sat there flexing every boot they had on the wall. Oddly enough I found that the Salomon QST and Rossignol Alltrack/Track boots had the most range of motion even compared to some touring dedicated boots. Sure they're heavy, but they seem like they'd fit the bill. Appreciate everyone's advice!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    西 雅 圖
    Posts
    3,197
    Quote Originally Posted by dills84 View Post
    I wish boot manufacturers would list the "range of motion" in the specs. Some touring boots do this but it seems like none of the "walk to ride" boots do this. I went to the Boot Shop and sat there flexing every boot they had on the wall. Oddly enough I found that the Salomon QST and Rossignol Alltrack/Track boots had the most range of motion even compared to some touring dedicated boots.
    Be careful about analyzing range of motion without your foot in the boot. The size and shape of your ankle and lower leg can make a huge difference in "real" range of motion. FWIW, when manufacturers do list ROM, they usually measure total range with no liner or foot in the boot, reefing on the cuff at room temperature. Usable range is less.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •