Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 81
  1. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    The Bull City
    Posts
    4,043
    Quote Originally Posted by Conundrum View Post
    Serious question. Would earning an MBA help more for owning a small business, immersing in big corporate culture or either/both?
    If studying actual real world examples of similar business ventures that either took off or failed miserably and why seems like useful info maybe. If at some point you might want to bring in investors or business partners, maybe. If there are things you pay accountants to do or other operational or finance expertise you might be a little lacking in maybe..
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by teleee View Post
    I am going to be the voice of dissent apparently. I would agree on the keep getting experience part of the advice if you want to stay in the construction world. An MBA has certainly been beneficial to me in my career though. Several of the mid size to large companies in Salt Lake will send employees to Westminster College who happens to have an excellent after hours program set up to where you can keep your day job and earn your MBA with real life examples. That paired with my engineering degree has given me a pretty fucking cool career. Just my $0.02, I am sure the dentists on here know better than me though.
    Thanks for the input!

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by TBS View Post
    If you want to go into civil engineering “management”, don’t get an MBA, do the following:

    Work for current employer for two years
    Work for another employer for two years
    And another for two years

    Then start your own business - if you are observant, by then you will have figured out the business aspects of civil engineering - what works and what doesn’t - without dropping $100k. You can then get a PHD in business from the school of hard knocks.
    I like this.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by Tamburello Rouge View Post
    LO-Fucking-L. Nothing like a manager that has no idea what his (or her) subordinates do or how to do it. And since when is being a corporate manager (AKA babysitter) fucking sane? You like sitting in meetings most the day? You like spending the rest of your time sitting at a desk forwarding emails?

    Not to be too harsh, just echoing what others have already said. A good manager is proficient at the jobs of his or her subordinates. If you skip the step of learning how to do what the "technical" people do, good luck with that.
    Wasn't planning on being the prick at the top. Planning on working in my field for a bit before thinking about an MBA program. It doesn't buy you a position to the top but I'd say it's an easier ladder to climb

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by schuss View Post
    Teleee has it right if you're going non Corp exec MBA. You want inexpensive and at night/your schedule. Then again I'm just a filthy ba/bs holder, but I work with many more degreed folk
    Exactly. Not trying to be some big wig at the top of some mega corp. Looking at applying it elsewhere - all conjecture, this was simply a day time thought

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    8,106
    Quote Originally Posted by SumJongGuy View Post
    If studying actual real world examples of similar business ventures that either took off or failed miserably and why seems like useful info maybe. If at some point you might want to bring in investors or business partners, maybe. If there are things you pay accountants to do or other operational or finance expertise you might be a little lacking in maybe..
    That’s a few maybes.

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    706
    Quote Originally Posted by J_Berg View Post
    Exactly. Not trying to be some big wig at the top of some mega corp. Looking at applying it elsewhere - all conjecture, this was simply a day time thought
    This...if you aren’t going to a B school then CU, Regis or DU are plenty fine for your general MBA needs If you want to stay in Denver


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    395
    Apply for a Masters in Real Estate from MIT. One year program. Quicker than an MBA start making money sooner.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    PRB
    Posts
    21,088
    I don't know much but I know this: pay very close attention to the cost of the program and your expected total debt. Pick a cheap program! Having to service a large debt will force certain employment decisions down the road, and it's much better to leave your options open.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    3,993
    FWIW, my brother in law is a principal civil/geotechnical engineer at a large company in SoCal and hates the management side. He just wants to do the work. Makes good scratch tho, so there’s that.

    No MBA; just a solid head for how to manage a business gained by experience and having some good mentors.

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    West Coast of the East Coast
    Posts
    6,448
    Quote Originally Posted by 54-46 View Post
    FWIW, my brother in law is a principal civil/geotechnical engineer at a large company in SoCal and hates the management side. He just wants to do the work. Makes good scratch tho, so there’s that.

    No MBA; just a solid head for how to manage a business gained by experience and having some good mentors.
    Project management, especially at the contractor level, is a nightmare sometimes. You get to deal with a barely skilled workforce, workers not showing, tripping over other trades all the time, GC monkeys that just don't understand how things are actually built, and horrible plans that are cut and paste from old jobs, and have barely any relevance to the job you are working on. Aside from the plans part, because that would be your job, I would say most of this is relevant at the EE firms I call on. I can't imagine civil is much better.

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Three-O-Three
    Posts
    13,909
    Quote Originally Posted by J_Berg View Post
    We've talked before about the Ripmo! I'd love to talk more about your experience in CU's MBA program if you don't mind I'll probably drop you a PM
    Sure thing man, I'm happy to help.

  13. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    The Bull City
    Posts
    4,043
    If you could just land a job building/rebuilding ski resort infrastructure you could have it all.. Solid higher level education, good paying and interesting job, and location and even work related excuse to rack up a lot of ski days..
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  14. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    10,072
    Quote Originally Posted by J_Berg View Post
    Thanks. I haven't even gotten that far as I'm fresh out of school. But the owner of my company went the same route and now owns his own business so that's my motivation. Good points - thank you!

    If you want to start your own engineering firm (we call them "firms" or "professional practices" rather than "Our own businesses"), you need core engineering competencies.
    If you're going to be a civil engineer, you have to have a PE in at least one state. That's not a little thing. It's not something you can skip on your way to "Starting your own business". You ought to know that.

    So much of civil engineering involves assumption and reduction of liability...you going on about your inspirational "boss" in the language of entrepreneurship and sales is weird for an engineering grad. And speaking of "Product development" like a major career track of civil engineering is also odd.



    Civil engineering on the whole is one of the more lucrative branches of engineering, but probably the most staid and conservative. Real engineering talent seems to gravitate more towards EE and ME in school. Civil students are analogous to orthopedics in med school...

    But starting a civil engineering practice that pays is one of the more difficult propositions in engineering. Everyone essentially uses the same software and conforms to similar standards of practice. It often takes years to get paid. It's as much about who you know as what you know, but you have to know how to be one of the best at something technical if you want to get your own work.

  15. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    10,072
    Quote Originally Posted by riser3 View Post
    I can't say I really respect anyone that gets out if technical and into management. Those are usually the worst people to work for.
    Fuckup officers get more people killed, faster, than any other kind.

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    OOTAH
    Posts
    2,447
    Quote Originally Posted by highangle View Post
    If you want to start your own engineering firm (we call them "firms" or "professional practices" rather than "Our own businesses"), you need core engineering competencies.
    .
    Pretty sure he said he is working for a construction company. Completely different requirements than a design firm. I graduated with a civil degree knowing absolutely nothing about the money side of the world, the MBA gave me a huge leg up in the construction side of the business, and despite what we technical nerds like to think, the world doesn't revolve around the laws of gravity but money.
    I am probably different than a lot of engineers though, I cant imaging staring at a computer cranking out design day after day so this avenue worked well for me. I have several registered engineers who work for me that would rather kill themselves than deal with the business side of our company. So really to each their own.
    I would say if you ever dream of starting your own construction firm an MBA will pay off in spades, especially if you can find an employer who is willing to help pay for it.
    Last edited by teleee; 03-13-2019 at 01:06 PM.
    Samuel L. Jackson as Jules Winnfield: Oh, I'm sorry. Did I break your concentration?

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    champlain valley
    Posts
    4,741
    Seattle


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  18. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    10,072
    Quote Originally Posted by teleee View Post
    Pretty sure he said he is working for a construction company. Completely different requirements than a design firm. I graduated with a civil degree knowing absolutely nothing about the money side of the world, the MBA gave me a huge leg up in the construction side of the business, and despite what we technical nerds like to think, the world doesn't revolve around the laws of gravity but money.
    I am probably different than a lot of engineers though, I can imaging staring at a computer cranking out design day after day so this avenue worked well for me. I have several registered engineers who work for me that would rather kill themselves than deal with the business side of our company. So really to each their own.
    I would say if you ever dream of starting your own construction firm an MBA will pay off in spades, especially if you can find an employer who is willing to help pay for it.
    That employer will want a PE first from a civil engineering grad. ($0.10/12) / PE = MBA

  19. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    livin the dream
    Posts
    3,491
    The executives at at my ENR top 10 employer worked their ass off in operations for 15 years, were superstars, then the company paid for their MBA programs.

    Experience is key in the construction industry. Plenty of success stories with zero education and decades of experience.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  20. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    OOTAH
    Posts
    2,447
    Quote Originally Posted by highangle View Post
    That employer will want a PE first from a civil engineering grad. ($0.10/12) / PE = MBA
    I dont think I said they wouldnt. Some construction firms like to have their engineering grads get PE's and others could care less. A PE in the construction world carries a certain level of risk with it. I prefer my engineering grads get their PE, it gives them a certain amount of credibility when dealing with designers. The company I started with out of college (a top 10 ENR employer as well) actively discouraged us from getting our PE. I can honestly say in my 20 some year career I have never once wished I had spent the time to get the PE.

    I completely agree with nickwm21 experience is key in the construction world. Pretty much the path I took, worked my ass off for 10 years and then my employer sent me off to get an MBA. Im not saying its the only path or even the right path, but it worked out well for me. I get to work on some amazing projects with people I like and respect. I get to travel when I want, get to serve on some pretty cool national committees and ski, fish and bike more than ever.
    Samuel L. Jackson as Jules Winnfield: Oh, I'm sorry. Did I break your concentration?

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    A LSD Steakhouse somewhere in the Wasatch
    Posts
    10,723
    I bets Tellee would ski a bunch
    If it weren't for the fishing addiction thing
    Just saying
    "When the child was a child it waited patiently for the first snow and it still does"- Van "The Man" Morrison
    "I find I have already had my reward, in the doing of the thing" - Buzz Holmstrom
    "THIS IS WHAT WE DO"-AML -
    ski on in eternal peace

  22. #47
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    OOTAH
    Posts
    2,447
    Quote Originally Posted by skifishbum View Post
    I bets Tellee would ski a bunch
    If it weren't for the fishing addiction thing
    Just saying
    Ha! Truer words have never been spoken.
    Samuel L. Jackson as Jules Winnfield: Oh, I'm sorry. Did I break your concentration?

  23. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    10,072
    Quote Originally Posted by teleee View Post

    I completely agree with nickwm21 experience is key in the construction world. Pretty much the path I took, worked my ass off for 10 years and then my employer sent me off to get an MBA.
    But you aren't recommending OP spend 10 years developing competency before he shoehorns a MBA and gets to be responsible for a big budget and scope of services. You are pretending he can pull it off with a statics class and some MBAspeak.
    Technical bosses have to rise up the ranks to discern and get the skills and attitudes to build a good team, and inspire and commit them to shit green cucumbers.
    MBAs have to fire enough of the right people to result in a team that costs x for every y produced.

  24. #49
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    OOTAH
    Posts
    2,447
    Not sure where I ever said that he wouldn't have to work hard. I am saying there is a path to success with an MBA. The MBA gave me a good understanding of the working of the financial world that an engineering degree hadnt provided me. The same way the engineering degree has allowed me to discuss designs, building codes, etc with engineers and architects, the business degree lets me discuss revenue projections, gain and loss calculations, deprecation schedules, etc.
    I have had the same team of engineers, estimators, project managers and drafters that have been the number 1 producing team in a billion dollar company filled with other teams for the last 8 years, and I haven't fired one person and have only lost people to promotion. I am guessing my formula works. I am not sure exactly why you have a problem with what I am saying? I also said my path wasn't for everyone and it inst the only one, but it worked for me and it has worked for many people I work with in the industry...
    Samuel L. Jackson as Jules Winnfield: Oh, I'm sorry. Did I break your concentration?

  25. #50
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    10,072
    My "problem" is that your path is not what you are recommending. Your path was to work 10 years to establish core construction and orgizational competencies, then get an MBA and stay at work for the same company.
    OP wants to skip the engineering "technicals" he's supposedly learned in school, and get that MBA so he can learn the ins and outs of running his own company and so get in on the big bux - and you're trying to be supportive and tell him that's a valid approach, and he doesn't need your 10 years of nuts and bolts appreciation after college to effectively run his own billion-dollar concern - Yes he does, and you are proof of that.

    Moreover, the guys who have been under you for years and years are guys who have been under you for years and years at the same place you've been for years and years. It evidently suits them and you just fine.
    What if OP bought your division/fifedom and put a person with 2 degrees and some internships over you? Think she would have a learning curve? How long do you think it would take before you rely on her to keep your team busy and successful and clear of distractions as they are now?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •