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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    Improve Skins Grip (G3 Alpinists)

    Was wondering if there is any methods to (slightly) improve your skins grip. Was skinning a steep track with some G3 alpinists (about 2 years old) and was slipping more than i would have liked

  2. #2
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    Sep 2006
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    Better form/technique? Thatís the only thing thatís helped me get better grip.

  3. #3
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    Mar 2008
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    Trimming wall 2 wall makes a big difference

    I think a softer ski allows the skin to conform/grip better than a stiffer ski

    don't lean forward, instead stand up straight & dig in your heels
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  4. #4
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    A little pop with your heel at the end of a stride will cause the skins to grip a better on some snow types.

    If you're side hilling, roll your ankles downhill to increase ski contact. Sometimes it also helps to exert sideways pressure into the hill (this can get you an extra centimeter of skin contact that will make all the difference) then pop/stomp your heel at the end of your stride.

    And, yeah, stand up straight and weight your heel like others mentioned.

  5. #5
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    Sep 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by I've seen black diamonds! View Post
    Sometimes it also helps to exert sideways pressure into the hill (this can get you an extra centimeter of skin contact that will make all the difference) then pop/stomp your heel at the end of your stride.
    This a big one for me. Iím usually the bigger/heavier guy on the track, and often the downhill track sloughs away under my weight. So I push my uphill ski sideways into the slope to set my stride further into the hill. This also helps move a bit of fresh snow onto the track to improve the traction of the downhill ski.

  6. #6
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    Feb 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    Trimming wall 2 wall makes a big difference

    I think a softer ski allows the skin to conform/grip better than a stiffer ski

    don't lean forward, instead stand up straight & dig in your heels
    It probably was technique as much as anything. It was happening on some steep switchbacks and i will try to dig my heels in more as i was leaning forward and putting pressure on my toes to try to get up them.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    254
    Quote Originally Posted by Pacman922 View Post
    as i was leaning forward and putting pressure on my toes to try to get up them.
    helps to do exactly the opposite with your toes - try and feel them pushing up against the top of your boot , it can be a better more subtle way of ensuring your heels are weighted. just stomping on your heels is counter productive - stomping can smash down the nap of the skin thats giving you the grip and make it let go. when its slippy you need to be smooth, not aggressive.

  8. #8
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    Jan 2005
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    After 25 yrs of touring my technique is so dialed I don’t even need skins.

    Srsly though, I’ve accumulated 20+ pairs of skins and there are differences in grip, glide, compactness, etc. For example I recently skinned a steep cold snow uptrack on orange BD skins and then on G3 Alpinists on similar skis...and agreed with my touring buddy that the orange BD skins have slightly better grip. But regardless, the Alpinists are fine so work on these technique tips.

  9. #9
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    Dec 2010
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    西 雅 圖
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    Quote Originally Posted by TG View Post
    helps to do exactly the opposite with your toes - try and feel them pushing up against the top of your boot , it can be a better more subtle way of ensuring your heels are weighted.
    This is the key. Pull your toes up, drive you heels down, try to put your weight just behind your heelpieces. Also helps to shorten your stride and make sure your climbing aids are up. If it's a sidehill and there is a hard surface underneath, try setting a track about 1" uphill from the existing track.

  10. #10
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    Nov 2008
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    5,397
    Chest out, chin up.

  11. #11
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    Nov 2014
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    As others have said, it's like slab climbing, you want to be perfectly upright, and stomping your skin into the snow can engage a little better when things get steeper. It does take more balance / core exertion than casual skinning, which is why absolute maximum angle skintracks are so irritating. If it were me I'd just set a new one. Even if you're skinning a 38ļ slope there is no reason to make the actual skintrack angle so high that the followers are losing skin grip IMHO... an extra switchback or two won't make your dick fall off fellas.

  12. #12
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    Oct 2003
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    Ogden
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    Quote Originally Posted by mall walker View Post
    ... an extra switchback or two won't make your dick fall off fellas.
    Yeah, but if you can't make subsequent parties afraid of a slide for life on the Flagstaff skinner...where is the fun in that?

    Another thing I've found that helps is if you slide the ski forward, keeping as much of the skin in contact with the snow as possible, vs picking the ski up.

  13. #13
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    Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    Another thing I've found that helps is if you slide the ski forward, keeping as much of the skin in contact with the snow as possible, vs picking the ski up.
    Yup, that's an important detail. Slide ski, then pop your heel on the ski/lifter as it comes to rest. This will maximize the engagement between the plush and the snow. You generally don't need to use much force with the "pop," just the momentum of your leg coming to rest firmly on the ski, although sometimes a real stomp to break through a crust helps.

  14. #14
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    Mar 2008
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    northern BC
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    sometimes you are stuck with the skin track that is set like at rogers pass where its steep/lots fo scrub trees, the track as set was ok but then it gets all iced up and yer back sliding into a tree well

    i went to rogers pass one year with 90mm skins on a 98mm ski and suffered, I returned the next year same ski with a full w2w trimmed skin, no more tree hugging, base coverage not the place to take a short cut ... literaly

    the W2W trim is key IME

    i've noticed a tendancy at ski swaps for people to sell the used skis with the skins that were trimmed for that ski instead of trying to re-use them on a ski that is less than perfect which is probbaly a good thing
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ross Thompson's land
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    615
    On existing skin tracks that are set up and become very slick and icy there are a few little tricks. Drag your skis wide to rub the side of the skin track, this will knock down softer snow that is more faceted and willgive better grip on the ice .

    In a steep icy switchback take the time to use your poles and knock down some fresh snow to cover the ice.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Western MT
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    1,179
    Lots of good advice here but just wanted to add that the G3 Alpinist skins are the second worst I have ever used on icy skin tracks. The worst was Voile snakeskins back in the day. Never had this issue with BD Asensions which I used for years.

    Alpinist is great for fresh touring and the glide is among the best I have used (including BD mohair mix), but I'm now realizing there are far better options for steep icy tracks. I'm sure that's why they developed the high traction version. I don't follow preset tracks very often and the Alpinist is a great option for that.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    Gonna try an experimental mod for increasing grip on specifically icy skin trails and loose facets/facets over crust. Think fishscale xc base pattern meets tractor tire chevron treads.

    And yeah, imo/ime Alpinists were next to useless on slippy glazed over skin trails or more challenging trail breaking snow like facets, hard crusts, windboard and facets or preserved stellers over all varieties of hard crusts. I use the G3 High Traction skins and they're mo betta; the glue still sux but they've proven to be durable and pretty damn reliable...but, i wanna take mo betta to 11 'cause 7.5 ain't good enough.
    Last edited by swissiphic; 02-23-2019 at 06:46 PM.
    What if the hokey pokey really is what it's all about?

  18. #18
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    Nov 2014
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    Third on being unimpressed with Alpinist grip. I have trab mohair mix skins (nearly full rando) that grip as well / better on icy skinners.

  19. #19
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    Jan 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peruvian View Post
    Chest out, chin up.
    You gotta open your throat, relax your jaw. Ďand donít forget to cup the balls.

  20. #20
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    Nov 2002
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    Eagle River Alaska
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    crampons.

    Salomon thinks everything I skin up is too steep anyway, so I'm thinking you should skin less steep things.
    Its not that I suck at spelling, its that I just don't care

  21. #21
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    the gach
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    crampons.

    Salomon thinks everything I skin up is too steep anyway, so I'm thinking you should skin less steep things.
    Number one reason I didnít get shifts. I was skinning up sunburst last week on a icy gnar skintrack with sketchy switchbacks on the high risers of my dynafits and I felt like I made the right choice.


    But yea slide your skis weight your heels make your poles longer so you donít try and bend over and sometimes youíve gotta kinda French technique it to keep your skins flat for maximum contact patch.
    But Ellen kicks ass - if she had a beard it would be much more haggard. -Jer

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    37
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    Trimming wall 2 wall makes a big difference

    I think a softer ski allows the skin to conform/grip better than a stiffer ski

    don't lean forward, instead stand up straight & dig in your heels
    That sounds a good trick. Gonna try that.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,412
    In my experience(vast), avoiding the lifters makes a huge difference in grip. I rarely use the medium lifter. The high lifter has a serious negative impact on grip.

  24. #24
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    the gach
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    lol wat? You must have way more flexible ankles than I do. I canít weight my heels at all without lifters on the skintracks around here.
    But Ellen kicks ass - if she had a beard it would be much more haggard. -Jer

  25. #25
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    Sep 2010
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    Zurich, Switzerland
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    Improve Skins Grip (G3 Alpinists)

    Quote Originally Posted by Chugachjed View Post
    lol wat? You must have way more flexible ankles than I do. I canít weight my heels at all without lifters on the skintracks around here.
    +1 way more grip using heel lifters here too. Had the same lol reaction.

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