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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
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    A little to the left
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    1,538

    Tell me if Im stupid

    Or rather whether this choice is stupid. I already know Im stupid in general.

    Blog: I grew up riding hard tails. Early ones. Im 42.

    Havent had a real bike for years. My kid is getting old enough to want to start riding trails. I want to get back to it too. With him and otherwise.

    Rode a bunch of stuff at lbs. everything feels amazing compared to what I was on in my past life. I dont have enough skill to tell a big difference. But plan to put in the time to develop those skills.

    I was thinking about something like a 5010 or a Bronson. I dont know yet what kind of mix of terrain Ill be riding. Assume highly variable and more interesting over time. I wont be doing any big drops on purpose.

    Stumbled on a crazy deal on a demo Hightower lt. cant find anyone saying anything bad about it.

    Obviously its WAY more bike than I need. But is there anything about that that would make learning tougher or otherwise be a drawback vs something shorter travel?

    I should add that Im like 205 so not at all worried about shaving a few pounds on the bike....

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    OR
    Posts
    1,326
    i'd go ahead and pull the trigger on a "crazy deal" for that bike in your size. you can over think this to death. you'll at least have a bike to ride while you do the over thinking on the N+1

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Trouserville
    Posts
    14,230
    Where do you live? First instinct says something like a 5010 would be great. But so would a cheapish hightower.

    And for the record I happen to think you're a very handsome young man.
    Besides the comet that killed the dinosaurs nothing has destroyed a species faster than entitled white people.-ajp

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ross Thompson's land
    Posts
    534
    Same question as above.
    Where do you live, the trails you ride and the way you ride them should determine the bike.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    2,612
    Echo.

    If the Hightower is really a crazy deal, just do it, its an aswesome bike, overkill or not.

    If its not such a crazy deal, a 5010, your trails depending, is a perfect ride.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    350
    If youve been off the bike at least a few years then no reason not to jump in full force. Get the best bike style for the trails you want to ride, then start learning how to ride the bike.

    Totally different than riding a hardtail.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    A little to the left
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    1,538
    Yeah I get that.

    Im in the Bay Area.

    But... I suspect that my increasing enjoyment as I pick up skill will probably determine the trails I ride.

    Hopefully the way I ride them a year from now doesnt have a lot to do with how Id ride them now.

    My master plan is for getting rad at this to be my mid life crisis. It was this or MMA...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    A little to the left
    Posts
    1,538
    Quote Originally Posted by kidwoo View Post
    And for the record I happen to think you're a very handsome young man.
    QFT and for the old timers, DPPS

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    350
    Thats the way to deal with your midlife crisis. In my crew just about everyone observed the rule that when you turned 40 you had to spend an entire year riding a single speed. Any style you wanted. Fully, hardtail whatever. Everyone was pretty damn rocked when they turned 41.

    I went a slightly different route. I rode my cross bike for that year. You havent lived till you are in Moab with your ass all the way back on a skinny rear tire gripping cross brakes trying not to fuck up at high speed. It all works fine. As long as you dont make even the tiniest mistake.

    I thought i could could handle a bike pretty damn good at 39. 41 year old me thought 39 year old me sucked.

    Moral of of the story: Im fully in support of your midlife crisis. Buy the Hightower and ride it till its holding you back. More power to you man. Go get em.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Fart Collins
    Posts
    4,180
    Buy the bike that's a year or two old that you can afford and you're not at all stupid.
    I actually think the last think you want to do with your first "new" bike is to spend a dentist's wage on it. You'll be wasting your money since you won't know what you really want and you won't recoup the cost when you realize you need something entirely different.

    If you only ride a little bit, it won't matter what specific bike you buy, it'll still feel amazing and you'll be stoked you bought it. If you end up riding a ton, you can spend the next 6-18 months enjoying riding and deciding what you really want in a bike and you'll start to understand the variables more. Then you can flip the original purchase for a good percentage of your buy in price and turn around and spend some real coin on the bike you know you want.
    Either way, win-win.
    If you want me to take a dump in a box and mark it tubeless, I will. I got spare time.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    A little to the left
    Posts
    1,538
    Thanks, man.

    That was exactly my logic going in...then the new bike option showed up at a price that's right in line with a good used option, and at a price where potentially selling it in 12 months when I have preferences more dialed might actually yield a profit.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Eugenio Oregn
    Posts
    6,958

    Tell me if Im stupid

    Hightower LT is great for Bay Area. Extremely versatile bike that will do very well at Annadel, Skyline, Rockville, China Camp, JMP, Skeggs, Nisene, Demo, UCSC. If you can, build it with 27 plus wheels and tires if you and your kid want to get out to Tahoe and the foothills a lot during dry season.

    Cant go wrong either way. In my opinion,5010 with a dual position fork (120/150mm) is probably the best do it all ride for the Bay. But Hightower is going to be faster over most terrain with the bigger wheels. Slightly less nimble and playful from 5010 - but we are talking really really minute differences.
    _______________________________________________
    "Strapping myself to a sitski built with 30lb of metal and fibreglass then trying to water ski in it sounds like a stupid idea to me.

    I'll be there."
    ... Andy Campbell

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Carbondale
    Posts
    10,120
    Pull the trigger on Hightower LT, don't look back.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    7,914
    +1 on you won't go wrong with a great deal on a HT LT.

    That said, new bikes handle a lot differently than old bikes. If you want to re-teach yourself how to ride "actively," you'll have a slightly easier time doing it on a smaller wheeled bike with a bit less travel (i.e. a 5010). But if the Hightower deal is legitimately good, I'd still go for that.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    44
    Used is a fantastic option - if the frame is NOT carbon. (warranties do not transfer).

    I ride exclusively hardtails in New England - where the terrain is rocks, more rocks, and more fucking rocks. Carbon hardtail with good wheels/tires/seatpost have been good for me. Improves riding technique.

    It all depends on you're budget. If you only have $1-2k to spend, find a hardtail - you will get better components for the money. If you have $2-3k - you can buy a brand new full suspension bike that should fit you're needs. If you have 3K plus - get a carbon softail.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    7
    Get the hightower. And if I might add, have your kid learn on a hardtail. I feel like going right to the full suspension when youre learning skips over some important bike handling.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Fart Collins
    Posts
    4,180
    I gotta say, all this talk of hardtails is misguided in my opinion. The best thing about getting back into riding after a decade or so was full fucking squish that works. Get something that feels new and modern. If you eventually end up back on a hardtail then at least you'll have some perspective.
    Think of it this way, you're 42 and presumably have been with 42 year old woman (women) who's "technology" has aged right along with you. Now lets say all of a sudden said woman is out of the picture (god forbid). Don't tell me there isn't going to be a big part of you interested in some of this newer, younger "technology" you've been "reading" about on Facebook and Instagram. So of course you're going to take it for a ride if you can get your hands on it. In the end you might find you still prefer the "older models", but ya gotta find out for yourself or you'll always be wondering.
    If you want me to take a dump in a box and mark it tubeless, I will. I got spare time.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    44
    It all depends.. I ride a SS hardtail and have more fun on it than any other bike (you do realize today's modern hardtails are light years ahead of ones from 10 years ago, right?). Plus, with good wheels and a seapost, a carbon 29er hardtail can feel pretty darn comfy. And -- less crap that can break.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    12
    Im 40 with 15 years off from mtbs. Two years ago received an old (01) Santa Cruz Superlite medium frame, did a 650b conversion to get me back in the game. It sparked an old obsession for riding but with the new trails being built I quickly outgrew the bike. Did some research and setup a demo on the HT LT. As much as the down is fun the climb is just as enjoyable. Bought the bike and have loved every minute sense. It climbs like a goat and soaks up the down well enough for my skill set. With new technology in the industry it blew me away with what these bikes can do.

    Not it sure if that helps you but I say buy and make some memories with your son.

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