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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrenalated View Post

    6.5lb is a full pound lighter than a Transition carbon frame (a company with a similar suspension design and similarly known for being burly frames).
    Frame weights on Transition's website include the shock, IIRC, while GG's frame weights don't, so take that into consideration. Still, they're claiming 29 lbs for the mid-level Megatrail build which is damn impressive.

    This is definitely pretty rad. It also mentions that because of the higher temp process they can powder coat these instead of painting which is sweet.

    I don't think any one is going to be rearranging their bike on a daily basis, but I could see the swappable rear triangles being a nice feature in certain circumstances. Say, if you buy a Megatrail then move somewhere where it makes more sense to have a 120 mm 29er as your DD. You could buy the kit and still have the Megatrail for trips, etc.

  2. #27
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    Nov 2005
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    2,870
    Main advantage of a shared front triangle is that it lets them build one mold for a carbon part that goes on more bikes so they can pay off the investment faster (ever?). So whether anyone swaps the rear or not is almost moot: they'd want to do it either way, so any other benefit is kind of a freebie.

  3. #28
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    Jan 2008
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    I'm impressed and very tempted to get the Trail Pistol, I'm not really the type to be an early adopter.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    467
    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Frame weights on Transition's website include the shock, IIRC, while GG's frame weights don't, so take that into consideration. Still, they're claiming 29 lbs for the mid-level Megatrail build which is damn impressive.

    This is definitely pretty rad. It also mentions that because of the higher temp process they can powder coat these instead of painting which is sweet.

    I don't think any one is going to be rearranging their bike on a daily basis, but I could see the swappable rear triangles being a nice feature in certain circumstances. Say, if you buy a Megatrail then move somewhere where it makes more sense to have a 120 mm 29er as your DD. You could buy the kit and still have the Megatrail for trips, etc.
    These are good points. I just got a Sentinel after seriously considering a Smash, and probably the thing I like least about it is how easily the paint chips. If I'd waited 3 weeks, it would have been nice to get the Smash now, and an option to convert to a Trail Pistol if I moved somewhere flatter.

    According to their build calc, their size 2 with DPX2 weighs about 100g more than a medium carbon Sentinel, which is no delicate snowflake. So while they're lighter than before, they're still going to be very stout bikes.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Magically whisked away to...Delaware
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    Quote Originally Posted by kidwoo View Post
    Really? Like you can switch triangles or links between a stumpjumper and enduro?

    Bout damn time.
    Nope....but you can switch SJ and SJ-ST...and previously the SJ and Camber. Not that it's advertised as a feature, but they use the same front.
    It makes perfect sense...until you think about it.

    No thanks. I'll stick with porn. - Benny

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Eugenio Oregón
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    7,025
    The bikes are already awesome pedaling bikes as is .... I think the weight savings may not be as noticeable as damping of high-frequency chatter transmitted into the headset and bottom bracket. I complained to Will at GG that with 35mm diameter bars and ultra-stiff stems on the 2017 demo fleet, the front ends were so stiff and locked in that they really needed carbon bars on the demos to make the bikes feel less harsh and more user friendly up front - at least on the trail configurations for more typical riders. I also wonder if they changed lateral frame compliance or not going to carbon front triangles. Knowing their engineering background I'm sure they tested this before committing to the line changes.

    I'm also really curious how the new triangle changes the feel of the moment of inertia around the bottom bracket and rear hub. With short chainstays the new frames might feel like manual-city! Hopefully they go back on the road with more demo days with the new lineup this summer ...
    _______________________________________________
    "Strapping myself to a sitski built with 30lb of metal and fibreglass then trying to water ski in it sounds like a stupid idea to me.

    I'll be there."
    ... Andy Campbell

  7. #32
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    Sep 2009
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    in the trench
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    8,712
    Been looking around at fork options for a new #eeb. The RS yari dpa 29+ would cover any build of this new gg. Internals look good . 150-180

    https://www.sram.com/rockshox/produc...osition-air-29

  8. #33
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    Mar 2007
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    Eugenio Oregón
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    Ooooooohhhh - adjustable reach headsets and stack spacers as well. Smart move to make their carbon investment pay off with fewer molds.

    And I read a 78 degree STA on the Trail Pistol. Man I would love to try the new Shredd Dogg!
    _______________________________________________
    "Strapping myself to a sitski built with 30lb of metal and fibreglass then trying to water ski in it sounds like a stupid idea to me.

    I'll be there."
    ... Andy Campbell

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Snowmass
    Posts
    352
    Even if people don't take advantage of the swappable stays it still seems like a pretty killer value.

    The carbon megatrail frame is only .3 lbs lighter than the alu, but GG has never been about building light bikes. I just picked up an aluminum model 2 weeks ago (lightly used), but even buying new I'm not sure the $800-$1k premium for the carbon model would have been worth it. Looking forward to demoing one to feel the difference.

  10. #35
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    Oct 2003
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    Ogden
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    So I'm sure it's somewhere on their site, but I can't find any info, where do you demo these?

  11. #36
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    Dec 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    So I'm sure it's somewhere on their site, but I can't find any info, where do you demo these?
    Since they're mostly factory direct it's a little tougher than most. You can demo directly from the factory in Denver. They used to have a list of other places on the website but I don't see it now.
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    All ye punterz! Leave thine stupid heavy skis in the past, or at least in the resort category, for the age of lightweight pussy sticks is upon us! Behold! Keep up with the randocommandos on their carbon blades of shortness! Break thine tibias into spiral splinters with pintech extravagance!

  12. #37
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    Oct 2007
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    8,241
    Quote Originally Posted by adrenalated View Post
    Since they're mostly factory direct it's a little tougher than most. You can demo directly from the factory in Denver. They used to have a list of other places on the website but I don't see it now.
    They had a list of ambassadors (BAMF's) which were located around the US and had small fleets of a few bikes in a few sizes. They also have demo's during the season.

    Probably best to ask them directly with an email or on mtbr.com as they seem to be pretty responsive.

  13. #38
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    Nov 2008
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    5,361

  14. #39
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    Sep 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by SchralphMacchio View Post

    And I read a 78 degree STA on the Trail Pistol. Man I would love to try the new Shredd Dogg!
    So does there come a time when mountain bikes are basically time trial bikes with suspension?
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  15. #40
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    Oct 2002
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    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
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    @jm2e, looks like you'll have some demos nearby.

    https://www.facebook.com/roanokeadve...73072882705563
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  16. #41
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    Oct 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    So does there come a time when mountain bikes are basically time trial bikes with suspension?
    I've wondered what is too steep. For most of my riding, I ride all uphill and then all downhill, so I think a steep seat tube angle would work fine. But what about those trails that are flatter and more pedally, that are neither really up or down, and you're just doing a lot of flattish pedaling?

  17. #42
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    Mar 2007
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    Eugenio Oregón
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    One word:
    Thudbuster



    _______________________________________________
    "Strapping myself to a sitski built with 30lb of metal and fibreglass then trying to water ski in it sounds like a stupid idea to me.

    I'll be there."
    ... Andy Campbell

  18. #43
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    2,870
    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    I've wondered what is too steep. For most of my riding, I ride all uphill and then all downhill, so I think a steep seat tube angle would work fine. But what about those trails that are flatter and more pedally, that are neither really up or down, and you're just doing a lot of flattish pedaling?
    The Yeti SB130 and Spot Mayhem are running a similar angle. I took them each out on back to back days last year in Moab and found that I was using the dropper to go down <10 mm a lot more often than I usually do. It started unconsciously, but by the end of the ride on the Mayhem it was pretty pronounced, especially on little sections with a lot of steps up and down.

    I think droppers are a big part of why these STA's work on trail bikes. Pedaling over something techie while seated at full height is less ideal above some angle (maybe 75/76?). But at the same time, that steeper angle makes it a little easier to pedal with the seat just a little bit down from max.

    It's worth noting that like a really high maximum seat height, though, so YRMV. I do kind of like a crazy steep angle on a TT bike, too, but above about 79-80 the effort required to keep from sliding forward is a bit much.

    Tl/dr: I think we're close to max STA.

  19. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    8
    GG is hype. Definitely looking at them for my next bike.

  20. #45
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    Oct 2002
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    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
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    Anybody seriously considering one of these should take advantage of the fully refundable deposit to mark their spot in line. Sounds like the orders are piling up.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    953
    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    I've wondered what is too steep. For most of my riding, I ride all uphill and then all downhill, so I think a steep seat tube angle would work fine. But what about those trails that are flatter and more pedally, that are neither really up or down, and you're just doing a lot of flattish pedaling?
    The steep seat angle does make it awkward to corner with the seat all the way up, so If it's flat but twisty I'll just ride with the seat down an inch or so. I find I stand up more to pedal as well, which I like doing anyway. Some place like Gooseberry the seats down almost all the time and I just stand to pedal. But like you most of our riding is longer climbs/descents, so the steep STA/dropper post combo really is a win/win.

  22. #47
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    Oct 2003
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    ^^^I was thinking of St. George area trails when I posted that. I think you're right though, drop the seat a couple of inches and stand more. Either way, I'm looking forward to demoing some of these bikes.

  23. #48
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    Oct 2003
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    slc
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    I'd pretty happily give up some flat pedaling comfort in exchange for improved steep climbing since I do a lot more of the latter.

    I'm leaning toward a Shred Dogg as my next bike (though probably not carbon), with the SBG Scout a very close second. The SD isn't quite as slack (can take an angleset, though), but has a steeper STA and becomes a Megatrail with only a shock and fork change. Hell, apparently with a DVO Topaz and Ribbon Coil even the shock/fork swap isn't necessary. I haven't fully convinced myself I could stomach the weight penalty of the Ribbon Coil, though. There's a 2018 Megatrail frame in my size on PB right now for $1300 that is burning a hole in my pocket.

  24. #49
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
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    In a van... down by the river
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    <snip> I haven't fully convinced myself I could stomach the weight penalty of the Ribbon Coil, though.
    Weight, David, is a feminist issue...


  25. #50
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Snowmass
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    352
    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    I'd pretty happily give up some flat pedaling comfort in exchange for improved steep climbing since I do a lot more of the latter.

    I'm leaning toward a Shred Dogg as my next bike (though probably not carbon), with the SBG Scout a very close second. The SD isn't quite as slack (can take an angleset, though), but has a steeper STA and becomes a Megatrail with only a shock and fork change. Hell, apparently with a DVO Topaz and Ribbon Coil even the shock/fork swap isn't necessary. I haven't fully convinced myself I could stomach the weight penalty of the Ribbon Coil, though. There's a 2018 Megatrail frame in my size on PB right now for $1300 that is burning a hole in my pocket.

    Rode my new (to me) alu Megatrail with a Ribbon coil on it this last weekend in St. George. There is not a thing I would change about it. The plushness off the top and traction are at levels I've never had on any bike.
    Click image for larger version. 

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