View Poll Results: Do you use leashes?

Voters
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  • No way, I'm good on the head whackers/avi anchors

    20 48.78%
  • Yes, not trying to lose my $1000 wood planks

    21 51.22%
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Results 51 to 60 of 60
  1. #51
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Colorado Front Range
    Posts
    3,739
    Quote Originally Posted by doebedoe View Post
    I use zipties as breakaway points. No idea if its effective or not. They don't have a particularly high breaking point, and I have popped one when I snow-snaked myself. Seems to works, I'm sure they degrade etc. But I'd rather have something that breaks away too easily than not easily enough.

    I've wanted to grab the leashes auvgeek mentioned -- but the ATK ones are never in stock.
    I think they're currently in stock at skimo.co, but I haven't checked in a few weeks.

    ... Thom
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    668
    Another plug for the BND leashes-
    If you have to take your ski off for climb/ski transitions, it can pretty easily stay leashed- comforting on a dicey ledge, especially on hard snow. Or, leash them to your pack once it is secured.
    Also, glacier travel. I have practiced dangling from a rope and ascending. For starters, I am pretty inflexible. But, even for you young, springy guys, much easier to get to the BND around the boot cuff than a clip up by the toe. Same idea when the ski is stuffed in the snow uphill on a steep and you need to release or do an inverted sit up in fluffy snow.
    There is some comfort in the fuseable link in the system for avvy safety, though I am pretty sure it is all theoretical.

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Colorado Front Range
    Posts
    3,739
    OK ... I have too much time on my hands at the moment. I got to thinking about some scenarios from last Spring which prompted me to modify my leash strategy - fixing my leash to my boot instead of to the ski.

    Last year, two buddies and I were on a cramped ledge, where dropping a ski into terrain that was quickly deteriorating (roller balls) was not an option. Conditions were getting bad real fast, and we wanted to traverse out of there.

    I was on skis with Vipecs, so no leashes, and you know how much of a challenge it is to click into Vipec toes on the first try. This had my attention, especially after the first failed entry attempt on the downhill ski, and I got to thinking that carrying spare leashes might be useful in this situation.

    Of course, who's going to dig into their pack in a situation like this, when you're trying to get your shit together and get out of Dodge toute de suite?

    So, I've taken to fixing my leashes to the back of my Zero-Gs, and for my skis with Vipecs (normally skied without leashes), I made up small cable loops for the leash attachment (like the loops they sell with Fritschi leashes).

    Pros:
    • You'll never forget your leashes (if you're the sort who shuttles leashes from ski to ski).
    • You only need one pair for each boot in your quiver, which is likely less than the the number of skis you own.
    • Clipping in is easier at the toe, than fishing around the back of your boot with two hands and a pack cinched around your waist.
    • Quick emergency clipping into a ski you normally only use with brakes (the scenario I mentioned above).
    • Unclipping at the toe in an emergency is easier (tree well?).
    • On the fly decision to use them on skis with brakes when a lost ski in powder would suck (fused leashes like B and D please ... due to avy concerns).

    Cons:
    • An extra step to "store" the leash (wrapping it around your boot - first photo), when you're either on a pair of skis with brakes or when when you're scrambling around.
    • It might get in the way of the walk mode lever, although this doesn't seem to be a problem with how I attached it.


    [edit]I moved the leash attachment to the power strap, the way @whatsupdoc attaches his. They stay out of the way better.[/edit]

    ... Thom (scroll for photos)


    Leash "stored" on boot (how I'd ski with Vipecs, and these skis since they're equipped with brakes):





    Leashed Up:





    Rear view - leash (and B and D fuse) attachment:

    Last edited by galibier_numero_un; 05-07-2020 at 11:48 AM.
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Tahoe
    Posts
    817
    Quote Originally Posted by galibier_numero_un View Post
    OK ... I have too much time on my hands at the moment. I got to thinking about some scenarios from last Spring which prompted me to modify my leash strategy - fixing my leash to my boot instead of to the ski.

    Last year, two buddies and I were on a cramped ledge, where dropping a ski into deteriorating terrain (roller balls) was not an option. Conditions were gettng bad real fast, and we wanted to traverse out.

    The skis I was on had Vipecs mounted, so no leashes. I got to thinking that carrying spare leashes might be useful in a situation, but of course, who's going to dig into their pack when trying to get their shit together and get out of Dodge toute de suite?

    So, I've taken to fixing my leashes to the back of my Zero-Gs, and for my skis with Vipecs (normally skied without leashes), I made up small cable loops for the leash attachment (like the loops they sell with Fritschi leashes).

    Pros:
    • You'll never forget your leashes.
    • You only need one pair for all of your skis.
    • Clipping in is easier at the toe, than fishing around the back of your boot with two hands and a pack around your waist.
    • Quick emergency clipping into a ski you normally only use with brakes (the scenario I mentioned above).
    • Unclipping at the toe in an emergency is easier (tree well?).

    Cons:
    • The slight cumbersome nature of having to "store" the leash - wrapping it around your boot (first photo), when you're either on a pair of skis with brakes or when when you're scrambling around.
    • It might get in the way of the walk mode lever, although this doesn't seem to be a problem with how I attached it.


    ... Thom (scroll for photos)


    Leash "stored" on boot (how I'd ski with Vipecs, or possibly these skis since they're equipped with brakes):





    Leashed Up:





    Rear view - leash (and B and D fuse) attachment:

    I've been doing this as well this season (attaching it to the boot) and it's worked out well.

    I run leashes on all of my touring setups with the exception of 1 (Hagen Core 12 with the toe brakes). All other setups have Salomon MTNs without brakes.

    I've always preferred the stretchy B&D leash over the short leashes that come with the bindings. I like the idea of a breakable fuse in avy terrain. The short leashes with no fuse wig me out a little bit regarding the avy risk. It's nice not to have to unclip to put on your skins on or something like that with the stretchy leashes. The B&D leashes require you to clip a little higher up to the boot however to take in any slack.

    Anyways I used to attach the leash to my ski and then clip the leash higher up to my boot but that is a PITA to unclip every time you want to undo the leash. For instance if I wanted to take my skis off and sit down to have a snack I'd have to pull up my pant cuff, unclip, and pull the cuff down. Same applies to creek crossings etc. It's easier to unclip from the binding as opposed to unclipping from the boot because of the pant cuff.

    The best solution I've found is to tie a small piece of 3 mm cord to the end of the B&D leash. It's easy to girth hitch the leash to the binding or to the boot in this fashion. Takes 10 seconds to girth hitch it to the bindings or boot at the beginning of the day. I also have a small zip tie fuse that I attach to all of my boots.

    In mid-winter when I'm not booting I'll usually girth hitch the string to the fuse on my boot and then just clip the leash to the binding. It's super easy to unclip at transitions this way.

    If I plan on doing a lot of booting (usually spring) I'll typically reverse the setup. Girth hitch the leash to the binding and then clip it to my boot. This keeps the leash out of the way for booting since it's attached to the ski. If I'm in more consequential terrain where losing a ski is not an option, I'll clip the leash directly to the boot instead of using the fuse, that way the ski will always stay attached to me.

    If the leash is girth hitched to my boot and I have an unexpected boot pack I'll just wrap it around my boot like Thom mentioned. If I use the setup with brakes I just take the leash off for that day. Takes less than 60 seconds to remove both leashes this way.

    It gives me plenty of options depending on the day and terrain.

    Leash:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Leash attached to boot (at fuse):

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Leash attached to ski. I can clip it to the fuse on my boot or just directly to the boot if I'm in more consequential terrain.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by whatsupdoc; 03-26-2020 at 07:55 PM.

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    20,095
    I liked the BnD leashes but i went back to dynafit brakes on Verticals even tho the amount of braking power sucks
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    SLC
    Posts
    5,220
    ^ maybe I am misunderstanding but if your boot comes out of your binding in no fall terrain, what good does the leash do?

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Tahoe
    Posts
    817
    Quote Originally Posted by mall walker View Post
    ^ maybe I am misunderstanding but if your boot comes out of your binding in no fall terrain, what good does the leash do?
    Good point, I edited my original post. I guess I should have said consequential terrain where losing a ski would be bad. I didn't make that really clear. And thinking more about it I guess the fuse probably doesn't matter as much as I was saying above. You're right that in true no-fall terrain leashes won't do shit anyways.

    Once several years ago before I routinely locked my toes on steeper terrain I dropped into a fairly firm, fairly steep N facing couloir and pre-released (I was on Dynafits, I thought I did everything correctly but regardless my ski popped off). I immediately sat down and was able to quickly arrest with a whippet. Fortunately I had leashes because I didn't lose my ski. I'm confident brakes wouldn't have done anything. My ski was dangling by my leash. I was able to grab my ski, put it back on, and finish the run. Since then I've learned to lock my toes in steeper terrain which is probably the most important lesson here. I probably wouldn't have lost the ski with the fuse (I doubt the fuse would have broke) but I can get a little more peace of mind in certain situations knowing the ski is going to stay attached to me.

    I guess the same would apply to skiing on a glacier. You don't want to lose the ski if you pop through a crevasse so I would forego the fuse in this instance.

    The stretchy leashes are also nice if you are in steep terrain and transitioning in a tight spot (like a platform you stomped out). I always find stepping into my skis kind of dicey in these situations. I can attach the leash beforehand and at least know I won't lose the ski when I'm trying to step in. I guess the fuse doesn't matter here really.

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    20,095
    with the BnD leash, ski is on the end of a 6 or 8 ft telephone cord attached between boot & binding so when you release/come out the ski loses energy as it goes away from you but it doesnt get any further away than the end of the line. In use I never take the ski off the leash, i can put pn skins or sit & eat lunch its just attached all the time but if you get in an aivy the line will break because of the plastic link


    but in a no fall zone you probably wana just lock the bind
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Colorado Front Range
    Posts
    3,739
    Quote Originally Posted by whatsupdoc View Post
    I've been doing this as well this season (attaching it to the boot) and it's worked out well.

    I run leashes on all of my touring setups with the exception of 1 (Hagen Core 12 with the toe brakes). All other setups have Salomon MTNs without brakes.

    I've always preferred the stretchy B&D leash over the short leashes that come with the bindings. I like the idea of a breakable fuse in avy terrain. The short leashes with no fuse wig me out a little bit regarding the avy risk. It's nice not to have to unclip to put on your skins on or something like that with the stretchy leashes. The B&D leashes require you to clip a little higher up to the boot however to take in any slack.

    Anyways I used to attach the leash to my ski and then clip the leash higher up to my boot but that is a PITA to unclip every time you want to undo the leash. For instance if I wanted to take my skis off and sit down to have a snack I'd have to pull up my pant cuff, unclip, and pull the cuff down. Same applies to creek crossings etc. It's easier to unclip from the binding as opposed to unclipping from the boot because of the pant cuff.

    The best solution I've found is to tie a small piece of 3 mm cord to the end of the B&D leash. It's easy to girth hitch the leash to the binding or to the boot in this fashion. Takes 10 seconds to girth hitch it to the bindings or boot at the beginning of the day. I also have a small zip tie fuse that I attach to all of my boots.

    In mid-winter when I'm not booting I'll usually girth hitch the string to the fuse on my boot and then just clip the leash to the binding. It's super easy to unclip at transitions this way.

    If I plan on doing a lot of booting (usually spring) I'll typically reverse the setup. Girth hitch the leash to the binding and then clip it to my boot. This keeps the leash out of the way for booting since it's attached to the ski. If I'm in more consequential terrain where losing a ski is not an option, I'll clip the leash directly to the boot instead of using the fuse, that way the ski will always stay attached to me.

    If the leash is girth hitched to my boot and I have an unexpected boot pack I'll just wrap it around my boot like Thom mentioned. If I use the setup with brakes I just take the leash off for that day. Takes less than 60 seconds to remove both leashes this way.

    It gives me plenty of options depending on the day and terrain.
    Thanks. I like the flexibility of a 3mm cord girth hitched for modification on the fly. I'm definitely not 100% bought into my attachment method. It could stand some improvement.

    I've also been thinking about how to replace a broken fuse link in the field. Doing this "gloveless" could be a drag on a cold day. Maybe I just keep a few zip ties in the pack for a field fix.

    BTW, I don't know if you caught my earlier post, but zip ties vary in breaking strength by quite a bit. I've bought some real crappy ones from a hardware store where the "latch" snapped off during tightening. Mouser Electronics sells some that are intended for solar panel roof installations. I assume this means more stability across a range of temperatures as well as better UV resistance. You can select by breaking strength and be you're own crash test dummy to determine the optimum ... or not

    I don't ski YFYD terrain - maxing out at "falling here is a bad idea" terrain. I think we covered this aspect (above) as well as the "dropping a ski while clicking in would suck" terrain scenario.

    ... Thom
    Last edited by galibier_numero_un; 03-29-2020 at 09:23 PM.
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    State of Jefferson
    Posts
    397
    I use the Dynafit ones on the boards I ski mountaineer. I use breaks on my yo-yo and sidecountry skis. I have lost a ski in the BC so I do think it's something to be concientous of.

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