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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Valley of the Sun
    Posts
    4,163

    Need a tent, open to suggestions

    Looking for a sub $300 backpacking tent.

    I really like the Tarptent MoTrail system. I imagine to be mostly hiking solo but would like to have a 2 person tent for the rare occasion I'll have a companion tagging along. One question on Tarptents, do they require a footprint or is the floor material rugged enough to go without? I don't see any listed on their website which would lead me to believe the ladder.

    The other tent I'm currently entertaining is the Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2. It is heavier than I want to lug around but is within my price point. Also needs a footprint, bringing the packed weight around 4lbs.

    Open to suggestions, also see my WTB thread if you think you have some relevant backpacking gear to offload.
    https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...45#post5574345

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Whistler, BC
    Posts
    1,325

    Need a tent, open to suggestions

    A couple years ago I made a similar thread and got some real good advice. Worth a search, I think it was called ‘tent chat’.

    I ended up getting a Oware mid and had a mesh ‘half’ inner made for it by bearpaw designs. ~400$ all in I think.

    It’s been great for the last 4 years, It’s been down the Yukon river twice, a few nights in Kluane national park bike-packing, loads of weekend trips in BC backpacking and sea kayaking and some car camping in the desert Southwest. It’s even stood up to a few northern English storms!

    Very versatile for all but full storm conditions. We use it just on its own (4people fit in like this, for 250g a person), with the inner, and sometimes just inner alone.

    I realize this is bigger than you want, but one of the smaller, or half mids, would probably be a good bet.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angry Whelk View Post
    a more stupid motherfuck does not exist.
    Big Balls is worst asshat kind.
    kind that wear bukkake from above.
    with warm drown he gurgles final death, for one time not worried about his misplaced import known of african american social standing and prominent community members. for he is only drown, as is the way.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Not Brooklyn
    Posts
    6,098
    I used a tarptent without footprint many times. Great product.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,680
    I use a tarptent with a footprint. I don't want to risk it, plus the tyvek barely weighs anything.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    2,204
    Check out luxe outdoor. Great mid tents.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Among Greatness All Around
    Posts
    5,162
    Solo of course a 2 person tent allows for a bit of space in the tent to place some gear. For fitting 2 persons comfortable you may want to go to a 3 person. But you stated mostly solo and occasionally a second person, then 2 person and a vestibule to put the gear if you can't or don't want to hang it outside the tent.

    Also another decision is do you want a self supporting/standing tent, or one that uses trekking poles and guide lines for supporting it (saves weight of carrying the tent poles if you already carry trekking poles... )

    Tyvek works for a ground cloth (wash it so it is not noisy), as well as some use the window Polyolefin type of plastic film cut for foot prints.

    Also weight can be reduced sometimes from things like switching out the stakes that came with the tent for different lighter ones (ounces usually unless you spend money on the lightest weight expensive stakes- that maybe easier to break also.)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    259
    What kind of tent is important too... do you need double wall or are you ok with single? Floored or floorless? I've been using Mid style tents for about a 2 decades and never go with anything else unless I'm car camping. Oware, Mountain Laurel Designs and Black Diamond all make solid options for those!

    I actually have a great condition Oware half-mid if you're interested in a cheap option. Weighs about a pound and can fit 1 comfortably, 2 if you like the other person enough.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Western MT
    Posts
    1,341
    So many good options out there for $300, the Tarp tent and Big Agnes are quite different so it seems odd you compared those two. I would avoid Big Agnes, lots of zipper issues from what I have read and poor finish work on the couple models I have inspected. For backpacking, I much prefer a freestanding tent, but my winter tent is a tunnel style.

    You might look at Marmot options like the limelight, they make good tents. It really kind of depends if you are looking for uber light or ease of setup/comfort but a lot of lightweight options under $300 for sure. If you don't need something new, lots of very lightly used options on ebay and geartrade.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Squaw valley
    Posts
    2,572
    Get a tent that inner and outer set up at the same time. Nice if it's raining or snowing so you don't get the interior wet, plus it saves a lot of time and aggravation, especially if it's windy.

    Tarptent wins hands down
    I have a scarp one, four season and it will accommodate two occasionally

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    12
    I have a stratospire 2 from Tarptent. Some of the seams are not the most beautiful but other than that the tents are awesome. The weight material is significantly more than comparable tents from other brands, without a huge weight penalty. They just seem more durable and less flimsy. I had a Imogene 3 from go lite before that. Similar to the seedhouse. The stratospire 2 is significantly more bomber and has a great amount of space. The tent holds up well in bad weather with a multitude of tie downs and hiking poles which are way stronger than lightweight tent poles. You could fit three in a pinch. In addition the interior tent goes up with the exterior. If you leave the internal body at home it would make a great all season structure to go ultralight or when winter camping. The floor material is tough but if I'm car camping or don't mind the extra weight I use a footprint. Tarptent is pretty innovative and make a great product. I highly recommend them.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    9
    I love my tarptent and tarptent has plenty of options depending on what you expect to do... What do you think you need in a tent? Snow shedding? Fair weather backpacking?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Valley of the Sun
    Posts
    4,163
    Tent would primarily be used for backpacking trips in the high desert, so not much precipitation but would want to be protected from a passing storm and moderate winds. There's a good chance I also use this for some ski tours in the spring as well.

    Heavily leaning toward the tarptent, I really like the idea of using trekking poles to set it up, one less thing to carry, break, etc, and setup looks like a breeze.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasatch
    Posts
    5,870
    Quote Originally Posted by east or bust View Post
    Tent would primarily be used for backpacking trips in the high desert, so not much precipitation but would want to be protected from a passing storm and moderate winds. There's a good chance I also use this for some ski tours in the spring as well.

    Heavily leaning toward the tarptent, I really like the idea of using trekking poles to set it up, one less thing to carry, break, etc, and setup looks like a breeze.
    I like a freestanding 2 wall, myself. The REI Half Dome and Quarter Dome series are good bang for the buck if you go that route. They're light enough. They're well-made. They're not too expensive. They do just as well as any 3 season tent in a storm. They've got the ventilation and features you want. They're the Toyota RAV4 and Camry of backpacking tents.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,680
    Quote Originally Posted by east or bust View Post
    Tent would primarily be used for backpacking trips in the high desert, so not much precipitation but would want to be protected from a passing storm and moderate winds. There's a good chance I also use this for some ski tours in the spring as well.

    Heavily leaning toward the tarptent, I really like the idea of using trekking poles to set it up, one less thing to carry, break, etc, and setup looks like a breeze.
    You say that now, but practically, it's not that great. You aren't a through hiker. Get a set of lightweight carbon fiber poles and you will appreciate the dedicated setup without much added weight.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by east or bust View Post
    Tent would primarily be used for backpacking trips in the high desert, so not much precipitation but would want to be protected from a passing storm and moderate winds. There's a good chance I also use this for some ski tours in the spring as well.

    Heavily leaning toward the tarptent, I really like the idea of using trekking poles to set it up, one less thing to carry, break, etc, and setup looks like a breeze.
    Just be aware that non-freestanding means camp selection is much more important.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    18,013
    msr makes the hubba hubba a good tent & not too heavy, I found it pretty bomber

    a buddy wore out his 1st Hubba Hubba after years of use actulay using it for years as opposed to just owning it, he bought another hubba hubba that he has bike toured across canada down the east coat to tierra de fuego and is on the way back which will be 4 yrs of constant use

    Be aware a 3 season tent is not going to take a snow load, if you do get a 4 season tent that will take snow load it will be MUCH heavier,

    I have a 4 season tent that will take snow but it does not breathe very well in summer
    Last edited by XXX-er; 02-05-2019 at 12:04 PM.
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

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